Attica: Includes 4 Bonus Movies [DVD]

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Black Brigade
With The Mod Squad sweeping the Tuesday night TV ratings in 1968, producers Aaron Spelling and Danny Thomas hoped to get another multiracial adventure series on the air A.S.A.P. Carter's Army was the 72-minute pilot for this project. Set during World War II, the film stars Stephen Boyd as an Army captain who doesn't exactly dislike African Americans-it's just that he holds no special fondness for them. Naturally, Boyd is assigned an all-black company, and is forced to share his command with lieutenant Robert Hooks. Despite seething racial tensions, everyone pulls together to destroy an enemy dam. Originally telecast January 27, 1970, Carter's Army failed to spawn the planned series. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Attica is a probing, no-nonsense TV-movie re-creation of the tragic events which followed the Attica (New York) Correctional Facility rebellion of September 9, 1971. Inmates demanding better food and living conditions used jerry-built weapons to take 38 guards as hostage. Negotiations begin immediately, only to continually break down thanks to uncompromising stubbornness on both sides. Four days into the crisis, the rebellion ends in a bloodbath, with state troopers firing on the prisoners-- killing several of the guards in the process. Based on the eyewitness reporting of the New York Times' Tom Wicker (here played by George Grizzard), who was one of the civilian negotiators during the stalemate, Attica was first telecast on March 3, 1980. (Perhaps significantly, Governor Nelson Rockefeller, whom many hold responsible for the climactic carnage at the prison, is never seen in either factual or fictional form during the film). ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

The Dark Side of the Sun
A youthful Brad Pitt stars in this drama about a man looking for the cure to a rare skin disease who discovers love on the way. ~ Jonathan Crow, Rovi

The Last Siege: Never Surrender
Disgraced federal agent Eddie Lyman (Jeff Fahey) is foiled by his nemesis, the ruthless American militia terrorist known as Anderson (Brent Huff), for the last time; Lyman is dismissed from his agency and sent home to his girlfriend, Valerie (Beth Toussaint), who happens to be the public relations chief for a rising senator (Ernie Hudson). The senator and his staff, including Valerie, board a train for a whistle-stop campaign to drum up interest for his anti-gun proposal, but little do they know, the staff of the train is made up entirely of Anderson and his band of cutthroats who intend to hijack the train and blow up a small town with a homemade nuclear bomb. Little do they know, Lyman boarded the train at the last minute to surprise Valerie, and, coincidentally, he was in the bathroom when the hijacking went down. Can one unarmed man stop the terrorists, save the passengers, save the town, and stop a runaway train? ~ Buzz McClain, Rovi

One Down Two to Go
This violent martial-arts film features a galaxy of the blaxploitation genre's best known stars, including Jim Kelly (Black Eliminator) in his final role. Richard Roundtree stars as a tournament promoter who gets shaken down by an evil gangster (Joe Spinell) and must call on his three friends (Kelly, Fred Williamson and Jim Brown) for help. Kelly is the "one down" of the title, as he gets put into a coma fairly early in the proceedings. The usual murder and mayhem ensues, and fans of gritty low-budget action films should be pleased with both the cast and Williamson's crowd-pleasing direction. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi

Cast & Crew

  • Stephen Boyd
    Stephen Boyd - Capt. Beau Carter
  • Richard Pryor
    Richard Pryor - Jonathan Crunk
  • Billy Dee Williams
    Billy Dee Williams - Lewis
  • Moses Gunn
    Moses Gunn - Doc
  • Robert Hooks
    Robert Hooks - Lt. Edward Wallace
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