Black Girl [Criterion Collection] [DVD] [1966]

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Overview

Special Features

  • 4K restoration of the short film Borom sarret, Director Ousmane Sembène's acclaimed 1963 debut
  • Alternate color sequence
  • Excerpt from a 1966 broadcast of JT de 20h, featuring Sembène discussing his win of the Prix Jean Vigo for Black Girl
  • New 4k digital restoration, undertaken by The Film Foundation's World Cinema Project in collaboration with the Cineteca di Bologna
  • New English Subtitle Translation
  • New Interview with actor M'Bissine Thérèse Diop
  • New Interviews with scholars Manthia Diawara and Samba Gadjigo
  • Plus: An essay by critic Ashley Clark
  • Sembène: The Making of African Cinema, a 1994 documentary about the filmmaker by Diawara and Ngügi wa Thiong'o
  • Trailer

Synopsis

Black Girl
The first major work of Senegalese director Ousmane Sembene, this 1966 film is widely recognized as one of the founding works of African cinema. Diouanne Therese N'Bissine Diop, a young Senegalese woman, is employed as a governess for a French family in the city of Dakar. She soon becomes disillusioned when the family travels to the Riviera, where her comfortable duties as a nanny in a wealthy household are replaced by the drudgery and indignities of a maid. In a series of escalating confrontations with her mistress (Anne-Marie Jelinek), Diouanne is painfully reminded of her racial identity. She is caught in the tension between the French upper-class and post-colonial West Africa and finds herself alienated from both worlds. Along with narration and dialogue in French, this film also shares the sparse tone and visual style of French cinema of its period. Nevertheless, the influence of Sembene's European counterparts does not diminish this subtle but striking examination of racial and cultural prejudice. ~ Jonathan E. Laxamana, Rovi

Cast & Crew

  • Image coming soon
    Momar Nar Sene

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