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Buster Crabbe Double Feature Collection [6 Discs] [DVD]
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Overview

Synopsis

Fuzzy Settles Down
In this western, Billy the Kid must convince Fuzzy not to leave the trail. Fuzzy tries anyway and buys a small-town newspaper. It doesn't take him long to find himself accused of embezzling money from his new business. Unfortunately for Fuzzy, he is innocent. It is his pal the Kid that rides to his rescue, and kills the real embezzler. Fuzzy decides that newspaperin' ain't for him and so leaves the city and attempts to find a quiet place in the country. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

Law and Order
Also known as Billy the Kid in Law and Order, this PRC sagebrusher stars Buster Crabbe as Billy "The Kid" Carson and Al St. John as Fuzzy Q. Jones. This time, Billy must impersonate a dead army lieutenant, in order to save the decedent's aunt (Sarah Padden) from marrying the villain of the piece (Charles King). It's a good thing that Billy not only looks like the late lieutenant, but sounds like him as well. Our hero does his job so well that he even manages to claim his lookalike's girlfriend (Wanda McKay) as his own. In England, Law and Order was shipped out as Double Alibi. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

The Mysterious Rider
Jack Greenhalgh's murky photography did not enhance this low-budget "Billy the Kid" series entry, in which a falsely accused Billy (Larry "Buster" Crabbe and his sidekick Fuzzy Q. Jones (Al St. John) flee to the ghost town of Laramy. Said town is lorded over by one Dalton Sykes (John Merton), a former lawman who killed rancher Frank Kinkaid for his gold claim. Going by the name of Bill Andrews, the Kid rescues Kinkaid's grown children, Martha (Caroline Burke) and Johnny (Dave O'Brien), from Sykes' henchmen. Fuzzy, meanwhile, plays the murdered man's violin, scaring the living daylights out of the henchmen, who believe that Kinkaid's ghost has returned to haunt them. Broken in the ensuing fracas, the violin reveals a hidden map to the Kinkaid gold mine. Sykes, who has gained Martha's confidence, attempts to get to the mine ahead of the competition but is stopped by Billy and the local marshal (Ted Adams). Martha and Johnny take over their father's ranch and mine, and with Sykes' reign of terror having come to a close, the citizenry returns to a peaceful Laramy. Busy PRC director Sam Newfield helmed this minor Western opus under his pseudonym, Sherman Scott.The film was reissued in 1948 under the title Panhandle Trail. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi

Billy the Kid Trapped
Here's another entry in PRC's long-running "Billy the Kid" series, again starring Buster Crabbe as Billy Carson and Al St. John as his comic sidekick Fuzzy Q. Jones. In this outing, a bandit posing as Billy manages to pin several crimes on Our Hero. Cleverly eluding the law (never mind the film's title), Billy endeavors to track down his impostor and put him behind bars. The plot is resolved by a typical PRC fistfight, which as usual is more energetic than expert. Young Anne Jeffreys, a starlet on the threshold of bigger things, is definitely an improvement over the standard western ingenue. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

His Brother's Ghost
An otherwise typically cheesy Billy "the Kid" Carson B-Western series entry from Poverty Row studio PRC, His Brother's Ghost is unusual in having no leading lady. Yes, that's right: no rancher's daughter or schoolmarm for Larry "Buster" Crabbe to romance and embrace at the fade-out and no damsel for the evil Charles King to bring in distress. In what could have been another departure from the norm is the fact that the comic sidekick is killed off early on. That, of course, is merely a plot contrivance to bring on his identical twin brother, who then goes about scaring the living daylights out of the gang that has been terrorizing Wolf Valley. The outlaws are so frightened that their leader, Thorne (King), takes the extreme measure of exhuming the dear departed to prove that he really is completely and irrevocably dead. Al St. John, as Andy Jones and his twin, Jonathan "Fuzzy" Q. Jones, had a field day playing the dual role, and Charles King got to utter such lines as "the only good sharecropper is a dead one." But all in all, His Brother's Ghost is typical PRC: shoddy production values (the bandits' hideout resembles, and probably was, a nice suburban tract house in the San Fernando Valley), occasionally inept direction, murky photography, and a wonderful overall sense of fun. But what happened to the girl? The handsome but somewhat stuffy Crabbe seemed lost without her. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi

Oath of Vengeance
Larry "Buster" Crabbe, as Billy Carson, and his sidekick Fuzzy (Al St. John) decide to turn in their spurs and instead operate a general store in this low-budget Western from PRC. But owning a shop in the wild and woolly West can be hazardous, as our heroes discover when they land in the middle of a range war between a group of cattle ranchers led by pretty Dale Kirby (Mady Lawrence) and the local homesteaders. In reality, the ranchers have been misled by crooked money lender Steve Kinney (Jack Ingram) and his vile henchman Mort (Charles King), who are hoping to gain control of the range. It all comes to a head when farmer Dan Harper (Karl Hackett) is falsely accused of killing one of Dale's cowhands. But Billy, on his steed Falcon (which earned second billing!), comes to the rescue with guns a-blazing. When the Crabbe series changed its name from "Billy the Kid" to "Billy Carson" in 1944, the unit also had a change of cameramen (from Jack Greenhalgh to Robert Cline). The murkiness of the photography, alas, prevailed. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi

Shadows of Death
Larry "Buster" Crabbe and Al St. John -- "Our Old Pals," as they were billed -- get in trouble with a murderous Charles King in this typical "Billy Carson" Western from Poverty Row company PRC. Billy and railroad agent Dave Hanley (Karl Hackett) are discussing plans to run the new railroad through Red Rock, but their discussion is overheard by crooked hotel operator Steve Landreau (King), who unbeknownst to Billy kills Hanley for a map of the proposed line. In Red Rock, Billy discovers that Steve opportunistically has bought the local saloon, which he is planning to turn into a gambling den. Jealous of Billy's growing friendship with pretty Babs Darcy (Donna Dax), rancher Clay Kincaid (Edward Hall) becomes beholden to Steve, who wants his valuable land before news of the planned railroad arrives. Billy, who is suspicious of both Steve and Clay, confronts the latter in the saloon. In the ensuing gunfight, Steve and his men are apprehended. Clay repents, and Fuzzy (St. John) later officiates at his wedding to Babs. Busy B-Western heroine Lorraine Miller was cast as the leading lady in this film but was replaced in the last minute by Donna Dax, whom PRC borrowed from Columbia Pictures' large stable of starlets. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi

Forlorn River
Paramount's "Zane Grey" series continued rolling onward with 1937's Forlorn River. Larry "Buster" Crabbe, a regular in the Grey films, stars as Nevada, who in the company of his sidekick Weary Pierce (Sid Saylor) searches high and low for the outlaw gang run by Les Setter (Harvey Stephens). It's quite a chore, since Setter is heaps smarter than most of the "good guys," especially ineffectual sheriff Grundy (Chester Conklin). But Nevada has an added incentive: if he brings in the villain, he's certain to win the affections of heroine Ina Blaine (June Martel). Too loosely constructed to be totally successful, Forlorn River is held together by the consistently excellent cinematography of Harry Hallenberger. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Frontier Outlaws
One thing is certain in Frontier Outlaws. Despite evidence to the contrary, Billy Carson (Buster Crabbe) and Fuzzy Q. Jones (Al St. John) do not play the title characters. It's true that Billy joins the outlaws for a spell, but that's only so he can trap them in the act. Outside of the usual sagebrush stuff, the highlight of Frontier Outlaws is a riotous courtroom sequence, presided over by grizzled judge Emmett Lynn. With such villains as Charles King and Jack Ingrim on hand, not to mention two formidable comedy-relief actors (and be assured that Emmet Lynn and Al St. John indulge in scene-stealing aplenty), Buster Crabbe really has to keep his head about him in this 6-reel PRC oater. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Western Cyclone
In this "Billy the Kid" series western, Billy (Buster Crabbe) is framed by an outlaw gang. Fortunately, state governor Arnold (Karl Hackett) is in Billy's corner, and surreptitiously helps Our Hero prove his innocence and bring the crooks to heel. But he'd better hurry: part of the bad guys' frame involves the kidnapping of Mary (Marjorie Manners), the governor's daughter. Al St. John as usual provides genuine laughs as Billy's sidekick Fuzzy Q. Jones. Though Buster Crabbe's PRC westerns were as a group pretty threadbare, Western Cyclone is definitely better than usual. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Sheriff of Sage Valley
In this episode of the "Billy the Kid" series of westerns, outlaw Billy (Buster Crabbe) is mistakenly appointed Sage Valley's new sheriff. He likes the job and works hard to maintain order. Unfortunately his crooked twin brother, who runs a casino and is in hiding after a murder, wants to keep the town a haven for crooks. To do this, he masquerades as Billy and starts causing trouble. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

Panhandle Trail
In this western, Billy the Kid confronts an evil con artist who has been trying to gull two children out of their inherited mine. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

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