Eric Rohmer's Six Moral Tales [6 Discs] [Criterion Collection] [DVD]
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$84.99
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Overview

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfers, supervised and approved by director Eric Rohmer
  • Exclusive new video convesation between Rohmer and Barbet Schroeder
  • Archival interviews with Rohmer; actors Jean-Claude Brialy, Béatrice Romand, Laurence de Monaghan, and Jean-Louis Trintignant; film critic Jean Douchet; and producer Pierre Cottrell
  • Rohmer short films: Presentation, or Charlotte and Her Steak (1951); Nadja in Paris (1964); A Modern Coed (1966); The Curve (1999); and Véronique and Her Dunce (1958)
  • "On Pascal" (1965), an episode of the educational TV series En Profil Dans le Texte directed by Rohmer, on the French philosopher Blaise Pascal, the subject of debate in My Night at Maud's
  • Video afterword with filmmaker and writer Neil LaBute
  • Original theatrical trailers
  • New and improved English subtitle translations
  • Plus: Six Moral Tales, the original stories by Eric Rohmer, and a booklet featuring Rohmer's landmark essay "For a Talking Cinema," excerpts from cinematographer Nestor Almendros's autobiography, and new essays by Geoff Andrew, Ginette Vincendeau, Kent Jones, Phillip Lopate, Molly Haskell, and Armond White

Synopsis

My Night at Maud's
The "my" in My Night At Maud's belongs to the protagonist played by Jean-Louis Trintignant, a Catholic engineer whose struggle with his faith is renewed when he falls instantly in love with a woman he's never met (Marie-Christine Barrault) while attending mass. A chance meeting with an amoral old friend (Antoine Vitez) the same night places him in a potentially compromising situation when he's forced to spend the night with Vitez's alluring acquaintance Maude (Françoise Fabian), a sophisticated woman who challenges Trintignant's belief through intellectual and fleshly means. ~ Keith Phipps, Rovi

Claire's Knee
The fifth of Eric Rohmer's "Six Moral Tales," Claire's Knee is a deliciously Rohmeresque story of sexual obsession. French diplomat Jerome (Jean-Claude Brialy), on a resort vacation, meets Claire (Laurence De Monaghan), the teen-aged daughter of a friend. Though engaged to be married, Jerome falls hopelessly in love -- not with Claire, but with Claire's knee. Realizing that to be revealed as a fetishist would be ruinous for him, Jerome does not act upon his obsession. Eventually he gets to fulfill his yearnings by placing his hand upon Claire's knee, a gesture which she assumes is out of sympathy for a personal crisis she is going through. Originally released as Le Genou de Claire, this film was the recipient of the Prix Louis Delluc and the Prix Melies. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

La Carriere de Suzanne
Suzanne's Career is the second of six short films that make up the Six Moral Tales series by French New Wave director Eric Rohmer. This 54-minute segment was shot in Paris with 16 mm black-and-white film. Bertrand (Philippe Beuzen) and Guillaume (Christian Charrière) are friends. They take advantage of Suzanne (Catherine Sée) and Sophie (Diane Wilkinson). ~ Andrea LeVasseur, Rovi

La Collectionneuse
La Collectionneuse is the third of director Eric Rohmer's "Six contes moraux" (six moral tales), and also the first of the series to attain full feature-length status (each of the first two entries, La Boulangere de Monceau and La Carriere de la Suzanne, ran less than one hour). Patrick Bauchau plays a self-centered young man on summer holiday in the Mediterranean. He finds himself irresistibly attracted to Haydee (Haydee Politoff,) the aloof young woman who shares his St. Tropez villa. Haydee is a sexual libertine, a "collector of men" (hence the film's title), but she appears disinterested in Patrick. For his part, the hero assumes that the girl's promiscuity is deliberately calculated to prompt him to seduce her. Filmed in 1967, La Collectioneuse was released in the US in 1971, by which time the fourth of Rohmer's Six Moral Tales, My Night at Maud's (69), had already debuted in America. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Mariage Blanc
Nadja A Paris
Nadja a Paris is an early short film from French New Wave director Eric Rohmer, written by and starring Nadja Tesich and produced by Barbet Schroeder. This is the first film collaboration between Rohmer and cinematographer Néstor Almendros. ~ Andrea LeVasseur, Rovi

La Boulangere de Monceau
La Boulangere De Monceau (The Girl at the Monceau Bakery is the first of six short films that make up the Six Moral Tales series by French New Wave director Eric Rohmer. This 25-minute segment was shot in Paris with 16 mm black-and-white film. Barbet Schroeder (who also produced) plays a young university student who is initially attracted to a girl he sees on the street. While searching for her over several days, he makes frequent stops to a bakery. When he finally finds the girl and arranges a date, it conflicts with the date he has made with the bakery salesgirl. ~ Andrea LeVasseur, Rovi

Présentation ou Charlotte et son steak
Chloe in the Afternoon
Eric Rohmer ends his cycle of Six Moral Tales with this delightful film starring Bernard Verley as Frédéric, a happily married man who discovers that he can't stop looking at beautiful women. As he says in a voice-over, "I feel marriage closes me in, cloisters me, and I want to escape." His escape comes to him in the form of Chloé (Zouzou), a woman from his past. Chloé had left for America as a successful model but has now returned to Paris, bored with her life and saddled with a man she doesn't love. Although Frédéric is reluctant to see her at first, they agree to meet in the afternoons -- just to talk. He feels a freedom with her that he doesn't experience with anyone else because they have, he thinks, no commitments to each other. So, they talk of their problems and their relationships and, before long, Frédéric finds that he is becoming increasingly attracted to her. ~ Paul Brenner, Rovi

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