Hottest Tax Time Tech DealsTurn your tax refund check into the new tech you'll love.Shop now ›
Ford at Fox: The Silent Epics [5 Discs] [DVD]
Price Match Guarantee

Best Buy is dedicated to always offering the best value to our customers. We will match the price, at the time of purchase, on a Price Match Guarantee product if you find the same item at a lower price at a Designated Major Online Retailer or at a local retail competitor's store.

Here's how:
  • If you find a qualifying lower price online, call 1-888-BEST BUY and direct a customer service agent to the web site with the lower price, or when visiting a Best Buy store, one of our employees will assist you.
  • On qualifying products, Best Buy will then verify the current price to complete the price match.

Exclusions apply including, but not limited to, Competitors' service prices, special daily or hourly sales, and items for sale Thanksgiving Day through the Monday after Thanksgiving. See the list of Designated Major Online Retailers and full details.

$39.99
Cardholder Offers

Overview

Special Features

  • The Iron Horse - Includes both the International and U.S. versions, audio commentary by author and film historian Robert Birchard, scoring the past: the Iron Horse sessions with Christopher Caliendo featurette, restoration comaprison, vintage program gallery, advertising gallery, still gallery
  • Four Sons - vintage program gallery, advertising gallery, still gallery

Synopsis

The Iron Horse
John Ford directed this epic-scale silent western, which was one of his first major successes and was hugely influential on outdoor films that followed. David Brandon (James Gordon) is a surveyor in the Old West who dreams that one day the entire North American continent will be linked by railroads. However, to make this dream a reality, a clear trail must be found through the Rocky Mountains. With his boy Davy (Winston Miller), David sets out to find such a path, but he's ambushed by a tribe of Indians led by a white savage, Deroux (Fred Kohler); while the boy manages to escape, David is killed. Years later, the adult Davy Brandon (George O'Brien) still believes in his father's dream of a transcontinental railroad, and legislation signed by President Abraham Lincoln has made it an official mandate. Davy is hired on as a railroad surveyor by Thomas Marsh (Will R. Walling), the father of his childhood sweetheart Miriam (Madge Bellamy). While Davy hopes to win Miriam's heart as he helps to find the trail that led to his father's death years ago, he's disappointed to discover that Miriam is already engaged to Peter Jesson (Cyril Chadwick), a civil engineer and Marsh's right-hand man. As the Union Pacific crew presses on to their historic meeting at Promontory Point, Jesson swears loyalty to Deroux, and makes an attempt on Davy's life. Later, after Davy gains the upper-hand, a Cheyenne raid leads to a shocking revelation about that fateful night when he watched his father die. Shot on location in Arizona in Ford's beloved Monument Valley, The Iron Horse was a massive production that employed over 6,000 people; two temporary cities were built to accommodate them, with 100 cooks on hand to serve meals. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

Hangman's House
Long believed lost, this fascinating John Ford-directed silent film was rediscovered and restored in the early 1970s. Based on the 1926 novel by Donn Byrne, the film stars Hobart Bosworth as Irish "hanging judge" James O'Brien. Even on his deathbed, O'Brien cannot stop meddling in the affairs of his daughter Connaught (June Collyer), insisting that the girl marry wealthy wastrel John Darcy (Earl Foxe). Alas, Connaught despises Darcy, preferring instead the poor-but-decent Donnaugh McDonnaugh (Larry Kent). Meanwhile, Irish expatriate Hogan (Victor McLaglen) returns to the Auld Sod to avenge his family's honor by killing the caddish Darcy. One of the highlights of Hangman's House is a steeplechase sequence, predating a similar sequence in Ford's The Quiet Man by 25 years. A young, unbilled John Wayne can clearly be spotted in this scene, enthusiastically urging on his favorite horse; reportedly, Wayne also appears as a condemned prisoner in a flashback sequence. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Just Pals
This picture was a departure, both for star Buck Jones and director John Ford (in those days known as Jack Ford). Instead of a manly Western, the focus here is on simple character study, even if it does end with a flurry of action. Bim (Jones) is the town ne'er-do'well, but he proves to be of some worth when he befriends a scruffy 13-year-old youngster Bill (George Stone), who has been thrown off a freight train. Teacher Mary Bruce (Helen Ferguson) takes note of the affection Bim shows towards the boy and insists that Bill be sent to school. Bim is also an admirer of Mary's, but she already has a sweetheart, the shifty Harvey Cahill (William Buckly). Harvey, the cashier at the express office, has come up short at work, so he asks Mary to loan him the school memorial fund. She does, but the school committee asks for the money before Mary can replace it. To save her Bim gets the money back and makes it look like he took it in the first place. Then Bill is virtually held captive by a couple who believe he is the missing son of a rich family. Bim exposes a gang of robbers and becomes a hero. In addition he finds the real missing boy and his parents give him -- and Bill -- the ten thousand dollar reward. ~ Janiss Garza, Rovi

Three Bad Men
Long thought lost, the silent Three Bad Men is an vital ingredient in the cinematic canon of director John Ford. Often described as a film version of Peter B. Kyne's Three Godfathers (which Ford would direct in 1948), Three Bad Men is actually based on Over the Border, a novel by Herman Whitaker. The plot, which spans several years, is set in motion when three bandits appoint themselves protectors of the heroine, whose settler father is killed early in the proceedings. A subplot involves bandit Tom Santschi's efforts to wreak vengeance on the man who seduced and abandoned his sister. The film was originally supposed to star George O'Brien, Tom Mix and Buck Jones as the title characters, but since the plot required the Three Bad Men to be killed off long before the fadeout, and since all three proposed stars had large and loyal kiddie followings, the roles were recast, with character actors Santschi, Frank Campeau and J. Farrell McDonald. O'Brien was retained, albeit relegated to a less colorful heroic role. Three Bad Men should be seen in its original release form; most commercial prints are chopped up and woefully washed out. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Four Sons
Long though lost, Four Sons reemerged in the 1960s, proving anew that the silent films of director John Ford were every bit as accomplished as his talkies. More "Germanic" in tone and texture than later Ford films, Four Sons is the story of the Bernle family of Bavaria. Mother Bernle (Margaret Mann) dotes upon her four sons Joseph (James Hall), Johann (Charles Morton), Franz (Francis X. Bushman Jr.) and Andres (George Meeker), but is powerless in guiding their destinies. When WW I breaks out, her sons march off to the front: one of the boys fights for the AEF, the others for the Kaiser. The film's most poignant sequence takes place on the battlefield, when one of the sons stumbles upon his mortally wounded brother. Though the dying man's plaintive cries are heard on the Fox Movietone soundtrack, the scene itself is effectively played in pantomime. An updated version of Four Sons, wherein the locale was switched from Bavaria to Czechoslovakia, was filmed in 1940, starring Don Ameche, Alan Curtis, Robert Lowery and George Ernest. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Cast & Crew

  • George O'Brien
    George O'Brien - Davy Brandon
  • Image coming soon
    Winston Miller - Davy (younger)
  • Madge Bellamy
    Madge Bellamy - Miriam Marsh
  • Image coming soon
    Peggy Cartwright - Miriam (younger)
  • Image coming soon
    Cyril Chadwick - Peter Jesson
Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.