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Horror Collection: 8 Movie Pack, Vol. 1 [2 Discs] [DVD]

  • SKU: 6775756
  • Release Date: 09/04/2012
  • Rating: R
  • 4.4 (7)
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Overview

Ratings & Reviews

Overall Customer Rating:
4.4
100% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (7 out of 7)

Synopsis

Waxwork
In this horror film, an evil magician creates a wax display of famous monsters and murderers and invites a group of unsuspecting young college students to view the collection. However, when the kids are trapped in the deadly displays, one-by-one they soon discover that the wax models are more than they appear to be. ~ Iotis Erlewine, Rovi

976-Evil 2: The Astral Factor
In this straight-to-video sequel to the 1988 horror film, Patrick O'Bryan returns as Spike, again battling the supernatural in a college town. The majority of the plot deals with pretty Robin (Debbie James), a coed who learns that her dean, Prof. Grubeck (Rene Assa), is a rotting ghost who uses astral projection to kill. One amusing scene has Leslie Ryan watching It's a Wonderful Life on her TV, which then sucks her in and turns into Night of the Living Dead. Directed by exploitation veteran Jim Wynorski, the film is full of obligatory in-jokes and a familiar genre cast including Monique Gabrielle and George "Buck" Flower, but isn't very scary or imaginative. Brigitte Nielsen appears briefly. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi

Class of 1999
Mark L. Lester's follow-up film to his Class of 1984 is a rancidly violent peek at a near-future high school world of terror -- The Jetsons meet The Terminator. In Lester's world, total anarchy rules (at least in Seattle). Classrooms are sinkholes of violence, and around the kill-zone high schools "Free Fire Zones" are set up that look like re-creations of Dachau. Rival youth gangs roam these areas with enough artillery for a second Vietnam War. The gangs' insane violence is exacerbated by a drug called Edge. When the Department of Educational Defense needs to supply new teachers, they look to a secret government agency headed by Dr. Bob Forrest (Stacy Keach) who sends new teaching recruits (Pam Grier, John P. Ryan, Joshua Miller) to the beleaguered high school. These novice teachers are not your ordinary teaching-college graduates, however. They are "tactical education units" -- cyborgs reprogrammed to teach readin' and writin' and 'rithmetic. If the students don't learn their daily assignments, they learn an even bigger lesson -- learn or die. The strict disciplinarian robots compel the student gangs to unite and fight the new educational menace. Under the leadership of Cody Culp (Bradley Gregg), who has just gotten out of reform school and has seen that there is more to life than killin' and cuttin' and Edge, the punks take up arms against the cyborgs who are invading their high-school turf. ~ Paul Brenner, Rovi

C.H.U.D. 2: Bud the C.H.U.D.
Originally conceived as a Return of the Living Dead sequel and later inexplicably re-titled (despite the highly questionable marketing value of a C.H.U.D. franchise) this clunky attempt at a horror satire involves a pair of teenage do-nothings who abscond from a military base with a corpse who turns out to be a zombie, the by-product of a backfired military experiment. Despite the C.H.U.D. (Cannibalistic Humanoid Underground Dweller) references, Bud (Gerrit Graham) is really a zombie of the George Romero variety, chomping down on human flesh and spreading the virulent zombie plague to those unfortunate enough to be onscreen long enough. Eye-rolling Graham is fun to watch, as always, and Robert Vaughn puts in a goofy performance as a rabidly gung-ho general, but they provide scarce gems of humor in a morass of reconstituted horror plot elements and lame jokes. The end product is more C.R.U.D. than C.H.U.D. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

Ghoulies III: Ghoulies Go to College
Though representing a slight step upward in budget from the previous two Ghoulies installments, this is still a rather silly exercise in childish fart jokes and rubbery monster effects. The title critters are mini-demons summoned forth from a demonic chamber pot (seriously!) by the occult-obsessed Dean of Glazier University. However, the ancient vessel is currently being used by the Beta Theta Zeta fraternity for a more (ahem) practical purpose. The ghoulies eventually cut loose on campus, and the surrounding frat-boy bacchanalia seems to have made them even more obnoxious than usual. The creatures' Satanic antics are first thought to be creative Hell Week pranks, but they are eventually discovered and defeated by the nominal hero and heroine. One of Vestron's last productions before the company went belly-up, this languished in distribution limbo for several years. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

Chopping Mall
This high-tech spin on the slasher genre pits a group of sex-obsessed teens spending the night in a shopping mall against the mall's marauding robotic security guards -- whose programming turns homicidal after a bolt of lightning scrambles their control circuits. Director Jim Wynorski cut his exploitation teeth working for Roger Corman's legendary "B"-movie factory New World Pictures in the '70s and '80s, and this film's comic early scenes contain homages to that outfit's heyday -- with humorous cameos from Paul Bartel and Mary Woronov (reprising their characters Paul and Mary Bland from Bartel's Eating Raoul) and the ubiquitous Dick Miller. The majority of the film, however, is essentially a teens-in-jeopardy story, with the lethal bots unleashing their amped-up arsenal and bringing the victims to nasty ends amid buckets of gore -- such as the unforgettable moment when one woman's head is targeted by one of the droids and blown up like an overripe melon. (The shot is repeated during the end credits.) ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

Slaughter High
When the school geek (Simon Scuddamore) is physically scarred by his classmates' ill-conceived practical joke, he vows to get revenge. When the guilty students travel back to Doddsville High for a ten-year reunion, they begin to die off in mysterious and violent ways. ~ Iotis Erlewine, Rovi

The Unholy
Archbishop Mosley (Hal Holbrook) assigns Father Michael (Ben Cross) to a church in New Orleans in this supernatural horror film. The parish church was the site of the throat-slashing murders of two priests two years earlier. While Father Michael tends to the mostly impoverished flock of parishioners and their needs, he launches his own investigation into the mysterious unsolved deaths. ~ Dan Pavlides, Rovi

Overall Customer Rating

4.4 (7 Reviews)
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