Make Inside Feel Like CourtsideGear up with great deals on the latest tech.Shop now ›
Horror Films: 8 Film Collection [3 Discs] [DVD]
Price Match Guarantee

Best Buy is dedicated to always offering the best value to our customers. We will match the price, at the time of purchase, on a Price Match Guarantee product if you find the same item at a lower price at a Designated Major Online Retailer or at a local retail competitor's store.

Here's how:
  • If you find a qualifying lower price online, call 1-888-BEST BUY and direct a customer service agent to the web site with the lower price, or when visiting a Best Buy store, one of our employees will assist you.
  • On qualifying products, Best Buy will then verify the current price to complete the price match.

Exclusions apply including, but not limited to, Competitors' service prices, special daily or hourly sales, and items for sale Thanksgiving Day through the Monday after Thanksgiving. See the list of Designated Major Online Retailers and full details.

$22.99
Cardholder Offers

Overview

Special Features

  • Closed Captioned

Synopsis

Vanishing on 7th Street
Four survivors of a mysterious plague of darkness flee the shadows that seem to have consumed all of society in this thriller from Session 9 director Brad Anderson. Detroit has fallen ominously silent; the power to the city appears to have been cut off, and the streets are littered with the clothes of people whose bodies are nowhere to be found. Desperate and terrified, movie-theater projectionist Paul (John Leguizamo) seeks shelter with television news reporter Luke (Hayden Christensen), frightened physical therapist Rosemary (Thandie Newton), and trigger-happy 12-year-old James (Jacob Latimore) in an inner-city bar owned by James' mother, who has apparently vanished along with the rest of humanity. Momentarily safe thanks to a power generator that keeps the clutching shadows at bay, the group ponders how to stay alive as Rosemary fears what fate befell her missing infant son, and Luke conceives a plan to seek out his estranged wife in Chicago. When the lights start to flicker, the fight for their lives begins. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

The Eclipse
Michael Farr (Ciarán Hinds of Munich) is a depressed widower who teaches shop in the small seaside town of Cobh, in County Cork, Ireland, where he lives with his two children. While he continues to adjust to life without his beloved wife, who died two years earlier, he begins to experience strange, possibly supernatural occurrences connected to his elderly father-in-law, who is close to death in a local nursing home. When Michael volunteers at the town's annual literary festival, he's assigned to look after Lena Morelle (Iben Hjejle of High Fidelity). Lena is known for her ghost stories, and Michael, impressed with the realistic nature of her writing, shares his recent experiences with her. While Michael and Lena grow closer, another famous author, Nicholas Holden (Aidan Quinn), a married man with a scandalous reputation, arrives in town for the festival, hoping to rekindle a brief affair he had with Lena a year before. As Michael and Nicholas clash over Lena's affections, Michael's supernatural visions grow more vivid and disturbing. The Eclipse was directed by Irish playwright Conor McPherson (The Actors), from a script by McPherson and author/playwright Billy Roche, loosely based on the story "Table Manners" from Roche's collection Tales from Rainwater Pond. The film had its world premiere at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival, where Hinds won the award for Best Actor in a Narrative Feature. ~ Josh Ralske, Rovi

The Perfect Host
A wanted criminal finds he's the one in danger when he hides out in the house of a seemingly ordinary man in this thriller from Australian director Nick Tomnay. John Taylor (Clayne Crawford) is a thief who is having an especially bad day; he was part of a bank robbery that went spectacularly wrong, leaving him with a seriously injured foot and his description being broadcast by every news outlet in the city. John needs to get off the streets fast, so he stops at a nearby home and bluffs his way inside, telling the man of the house, Warwick Wilson (David Hyde Pierce), that he's a friend of a friend and was told to drop by sometime. Warwick buys John's story, and even invites him to stay for dinner, but before long John realizes he picked the wrong house to pull this scam. Warwick is a perfect gentleman on the outside, but inside he's an angry and unstable person, and when he finds out that John isn't an ordinary visitor, he's in for a fight for his life. The Perfect Host was an official selection at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

I Saw the Devil
Censored upon its original release in Korea due to scenes of extreme violence, director Kim Jee-Woon's uncompromising meditation on the morality of revenge tells the story of a special agent who sets out to give the serial killer who murdered his wife a taste of his own medicine. Lee Byung-hun (The Good, the Bad, and the Weird) and Choi Min-Sik (Oldboy) star. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

Good Neighbors
A series of unsolved murders raises suspicions among the residents of a Montreal apartment building in this thriller starring Jay Baruchel, Scott Speedman, and Emily Hampshire. It's the winter of 1995. Montreal has been shaken by a series of brutal murders when Victor (Baruchel) moves into a tenement building already occupied by Spencer (Speedmam) and Louise (Hampshire). Shortly after Victor moves in, the killing spree intensifies. As suspicions fall on the newest tenant, both Victor and his new neighbors begin to reassess their opinions of what it means to have privacy while living in such close proximity to others. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

Apartment 143
A team of parapsychologists employ cutting-edge technology to investigate a haunting in an apartment building, and encounter something so terrifying it's beyond human comprehension in this found-footage-style supernatural thriller. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

Pulse
As one of the most cutting-edge Japanese filmmakers, Kiyoshi Kurosawa once again wraps a lowbrow, much-maligned genre -- in this case horror flicks (which were the rage in Japan at the time of this release) -- around some decidedly highbrow philosophical concepts. At the film's outset, Michi (Kumiko Aso) and her cohorts at a rooftop nursery cannot get ahold of their co-worker, Taguchi (Kenji Mizuhashi), who has an important floppy disk. When she ventures over to his apartment, she finds him pale, listless, and unusually quiet -- that is until he suddenly hangs himself. While the suicide is disconcerting, what really freaks Michi out is that Taguchi's body seems to dissolve into the wall, leaving a sickly black stain. Meanwhile, college slacker Ryosuke Kawashima (Haruhiko Kato) logs onto the Internet for the first time even though he is not particularly fond of computers. Instead of stumbling into a porn site or a chat room, he finds himself in a most peculiar site -- he just sees ghostly images of other people going about their everyday life. Then the computer prompts him, asking, "Would you like to meet ghosts?" Even though he eventually pulls the plug, the machine still on occasion springs to life. He eventually consults a comely computer maven named Harue (Koyuki), who is also utterly baffled. As more and more Internet users seal themselves into their rooms with red duct tape and melt into black splotches, Kawashima and Michi independently come to discover that the Internet has become portal for an increasingly crowded afterlife. As Tokyo becomes increasingly depopulated, Kawashima and Michi cross paths. This film -- which also features cameos by Kurosawa regulars Koji Yakusho, Jun Fubuki, and Sho Aikawa -- was screened at the 2001 Cannes and Toronto Film Festivals. ~ Jonathan Crow, Rovi

The Oxford Murders
A young American mathematician visiting the United Kingdom is drawn into a complex murder mystery when his landlady is brutally slain in director Álex de la Iglesia's tense and stylish thriller. John Hurt stars in a film scripted by longtime de la Iglesia collaborator Jorge Guerricaechevarría. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.