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Jackie Chan: Eight Film Collection [2 Discs] [DVD]

  • SKU: 27754141
  • Release Date: 05/06/2015
  • Rating: R
  • 5.0 (1)
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Overview

Ratings & Reviews

Overall Customer Rating:
5.0
100% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (1 out of 1)

Synopsis

Battle Creek Brawl
After the death of Bruce Lee in 1973, writer/director Robert Clouse made several attempts to reproduce the success of his Enter the Dragon, which belatedly made Lee a household name in America. Clouse felt (with good reason) that Jackie Chan could be the next big martial arts star in America, and he crafted this feature with him in mind. Jerry Kwan (Chan) is a Korean immigrant trying to make good in Chicago in the 1930s. Work isn't easy to find for an Asian immigrant. Jerry is forced by Domenici (Jose Ferrer), a well-connected mobster, to represent him in a no-holds-barred, winner-take-all battle in Texas. But can Jerry handle the pressure? The Big Brawl was Jackie Chan's first starring role in an American film, but Chan wouldn't break through in the United States until the 1996 U.S. release of Rumble in the Bronx. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

Police Story 2
In this crime drama, set in Hong Kong, police officers begin a city-wide search for a psychotic killer. Along the way, they must also deal with their own personal and professional issues. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

Magnificent Bodyguards
Jackie Chan stars in this period martial arts yarn -- which was originally shot in 3-D -- as Ting Chung, a kung-fu master summoned by a beautiful princess to shepherd her and her ailing brother through the notoriously dangerous "Stormy Hills" to a legendary doctor on the other side. Ting quickly realizes that danger is literally at every turn, and he is forced to contend with murderous fake monks, bandits of every stripe and shape, and a trap-laden temple. When their journey is nearly complete, Ting learns that his clients have not been truthful regarding the real reason of their journey. James Tien and Leung Siu Lung also appear. ~ Jonathan Crow, Rovi

Police Story
This was internationally famous Jackie Chan's breakthrough action film, the work that got him past the ethnic boundaries of Hong Kong and into competition at the New York Film Festival in 1986. It also got him into the hospital after performing a stunt in which he fell through a glass canopy -- and stopped breathing. The story itself is not particularly profound. Kevin (Ga-kui) (Chan) is an honest, self-effacing cop who manages to capture drug lord Cho (Cho Leung) almost single-handedly. A reluctant Kevin is then assigned the job of protecting Cho's secretary Selena (Brigitte Lin) who is going to testify against him. Sure enough, the trial date comes, and Selena disappears, while Cho has to be set free for lack of evidence. The next thing he knows, Kevin is framed by Cho for the murder of a fellow (dirty) cop and is running like heck from the bad guys as well as the police. Some incredible stunts in this film include Chan being dragged behind a double-decker bus. One of Jackie Chan's trademarks are hilarious outtakes shown during the end credits, and they are among the best here. This feature is repeated to great advantage at the end of his 1998 hit Rush Hour as well. Police Story picked up "Best Picture" and "Best Action Choreography" at the 1986 Hong Kong Film Festival and was nominated for several other awards that year. Sequel after sequel followed. ~ Eleanor Mannikka, Rovi

Crime Story
Internationally famed action star Jackie Chan tones down his usual martial arts pyrotechnics for a more traditionally dramatic role in this police drama. Crime Story finds Chan portraying a Hong Kong police detective, an honest cop guilt-ridden over his participation in a recent shoot-out. He is absolved of wrong-doing by the force, however, and assigned to protect a major real estate developer. Despite Chan's best efforts, though, the man under his care is soon kidnapped. The criminals demand millions in payment from the developer's wife, and Chan takes it upon himself to try and foil their plot and rescue the developer. His job is made more difficult by the fact that his new partner on the case, an esteemed detective, is secretly in cahoots with the criminals. Though there are a number of martial arts sequences near the film's climax, much of the action is more typical of Hollywood than Hong Kong, consisting of shoot-outs, explosions, and extended car chases. The ample amount of blood and the overall gritty tone combines with Chan's restrained performance to create a darker experience than most other Chan films familiar to American audiences. ~ Judd Blaise, Rovi

City Hunter
This 1992 film is a live-action version of a popular Japanese comic book and animated series, transformed into a vehicle for international action hero Jackie Chan. Ryu Saeba (Chan), a womanizing private detective, is hired to find the runaway daughter of a wealthy businessman. Ryu's pursuit of the girl leads him to a cruise ship. Through coincidence, and a plot device borrowed from Die Hard, the ocean liner is hijacked, leaving Ryu to contend with the hostage takers as well as the elusive daughter. The action is satisfying, but standard fare for Chan, highlighted by a scene in which an onscreen battle between Bruce Lee and Kareem Abdul-Jabar from the film Game of Death plays on a movie screen in the background, while Chan and his opponents mimic the fight in the foreground. ~ Jonathan E. Laxamana, Rovi

The Protector
Although this American action film, which has little of Jackie Chan's comedic martial arts, was less successful in the U.S. than hoped, it is still a worthy effort. Chan plays Billy Wong, a New York cop whose partner is murdered by Hong Kong gangsters. His new partner is Danny Gorani (Danny Aiello). They are sent to rescue an American woman who was kidnapped and taken to Hong Kong. There, they must also stop a shipment of narcotics before it reaches the U.S. The mismatching of Chan and Aiello is reminiscent of the chemistry between Nick Nolte and Eddie Murphy in the original buddy-cop film, 48 HRS. The lack of success of this enjoyable thriller was unfortunate; Chan would not make another attempt to break into the American market until 1996 with the hit Rumble in the Bronx. ~ Jonathan E. Laxamana, Rovi

Dragon Fist
Jackie Chan stars in this uncharacteristically somber early work helmed by the legendary martial arts director Lo Wei. When kung-fu master San-thye is killed by the nefarious Chung Chien-kuen (Yam Sai-kwoon) of the Patience family, his student Tang How-yuen (Chan) takes San-thye's widow and his daughter (Nora Miao Ker-hsiu) with him on his quest for vengeance. Once Tang tracks down Chung, he reluctantly agrees to give his master's killer three days time to prepare. When he returns, Tang learns that Chung sawed off his own leg rather than fight the strapping lad. Though deeply disappointed, Tang has other things to worry about. The villainous Wei clan has poisoned San-thye's widow and holds the only known antidote. Eventually, the family convinces Tang to help them fight the Patience clan. Yet when their activities grow ever more devious and dishonest, Tang finds himself caught between the two warring clans. ~ Jonathan Crow, Rovi

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