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Lost Silent Classics Collection: Thrills of the Silent Screen [DVD]

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Overview

Synopsis

Stepping on the Gas
The Girl and Her Trust
This exciting drama from D.W. Griffith was a remake of his earlier The Lonedale Operator. Grace (Dorothy Bernard) is a telegraph operator for the train line. She is attracted to her co-worker Jack. When a bank sends $2000 on the train that is to be picked up at the telegraph office, a couple of tramps who were riding on the train break into the telegraph office and attempt to get into the strong-box. Grace puts a bullet in the key-hole of the door and hits it with a hammer and scissors to try to scare the tramps off, but they pull the strongbox out the door. She telegraphs for help and then runs outside to try to stop the robbery. The tramps kidnap her and make their escape on a railroad hand-car. However, her friend Jack races to the rescue with a train. Griffith features Bernard as a strong career-woman who works hard at her job. This film shows that after four years cranking out one or two films a week, Griffith had become a talented director. The "traveling shots" of the train speeding to the rescue, as well as quick editing, made this a suspenseful film for its day. ~ Bruce Calvert, Rovi

Zampa
The Juggernaut
Juggernaut might be better known today if it hadn't had the bad luck to open the same week as D.W. Griffith's super-spectacle The Birth of a Nation. Frank Currier plays a mercenary railroad owner who, oblivious to the dangers posed to his customers, has allowed his line to become appallingly dilapidated. But when he finds that his own daughter Anita Stewart is on a doomed train, Currier piles into a fast car and chases down the locomotive, hoping to avert disaster. He doesn't, and the film ends on a wholly unexpected tragic note. Much was made of the fact that Vitagraph went to the expense of destroying a real train for this film, even though "planned" train wrecks had been a staple of county fairs for years. The film's romantic lead was played by Earle Williams, who would soon be voted the most popular male star in moviedom by the readers of Motion Picture Magazine. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Cast & Crew

  • Kenneth MacDonald
    Kenneth MacDonald
  • Image coming soon
    Robert Littlefield
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