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Popeye the Sailor, Vol. 3: 1941-1943 [2 Discs] (DVD) (Black & White) (Eng)

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    Rating Breakdown

    100%
    (1 Review)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    Plot:
    5
    Cinematography:
    5
    Acting:
    5
    DVD Extras:
    5

    Product Availability

    Special Offer

    Cardholder Offer

    Ratings & Reviews

    Overall Customer Rating:
    100% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (1 out of 1)

    Rating Breakdown

    100%
    (1 Review)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    Plot:
    5
    Cinematography:
    5
    Acting:
    5
    DVD Extras:
    5

    For Parents

    Age
    5
    Common Sense Media Says:
    Classic 'toon mixes spinach and stereotypes.

    Special Features

    • Commentaries and Popeye Popumentaries with animators, historians and others profiling specific cartoons, characters and creators
    • Retrospectice documentary Forging the Frame: The Roots of Animation, 1921-1923
    • Bonus shorts from the vaults

    Synopsis

    Includes:
  • The Clown's Little Brother (1920)
  • The Cartoon Factory (1924)
  • Koko Needles the Boss (1927)
  • Finding His Voice (1929)
  • Pest Pilot (1941)
  • Child Psykolojiky (1941)
  • Olive's Boithday Presink (1941)
  • Olive's Sweepstakes Ticket (1941)
  • Nix on Hypnotricks (1941)
  • I'll Never Crow Again (1941)
  • Problem Pappy (1941)
  • Popeye Meets Rip Van Winkle (1941)
  • Quiet! Pleeze (1941)
  • Flies Ain't Human (1941)
  • The Mighty Navy (1941)
  • Me Musical Nephews (1942)
  • Many Tanks (1942)
  • You're a Sap, Mr. Jap (1942)
  • Baby Wants a Bottleship (1942)
  • Alona on the Sarong Seas (1942)
  • A Hull of a Mess (1942)
  • Scrap the Japs (1942)
  • Pipeye, Pupeye, Poopeye & Peepeye (1942)
  • Kickin' the Conga 'round (1942)
  • Olive Oyl and Water Don't Mix (1942)
  • Fleets of Stren'th (1942)
  • Blunder Below (1942)
  • Cartoons Ain't Human (1943)
  • The Hungry Goat (1943)
  • Wood-Peckin' (1943)
  • Happy Birthdaze (1943)
  • Spinach Fer Britain (1943)
  • A Jolly Good Furlough (1943)
  • Too Weak to Work (1943)
  • Seein' Red, White 'N' Blue (1943)
  • Ration Fer the Duration (1943)

    The Clown's Little Brother
    No synopsis available.

    The Cartoon Factory
    No synopsis available.

    Koko Needles the Boss
    No synopsis available.

    Finding His Voice
    No synopsis available.

    Pest Pilot
    The owner and head pilot of an "air-conditioned" airport, Popeye is pestered by his 99-year-old Pappy, who insists upon become a flyboy himself. When Popeye tells Pappy to go home and stay home, the disgruntled oldster commanders a spare plane and goes on a joyride himself. But "joy" can hardly describe the terror experience by Pappy as his out-of-control aircraft careens all over the world. . .buzzing a subway, melting igloos, knocking over palm trees, etc. Ultimately, what goes up must come down, and an enraged Popeye is on hand to pick up the pieces. This was the first "Popeye" cartoon to utilize the famous "tooting pipe" opening credits. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Child Psykolojiky
    Inspired by Popeye's bedtime story about "George Washlincoln" and the cherry tree, Swee'pea takes his little hatchet, cuts a hole in the floor, and admits to his perfidy. Popeye's Pappy is all for beating the daylights out of Swee'pea, but Popeye consults his child psychology book and discovers that, when a child does something wrong but confesses to it, he should be rewarded. While Popeye is out shopping for a gift for Swee'pea, the disgruntled Pappy determines to get even with the kid, first by subjecting him to an impromptu trapeze act, then by playing "William Tell"--with a real shotgun, which somehow morphs into a pogo stick. This was the last "Popeye" cartoon to open with the traditional "ship's hold" credit titles. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Olive's Boithday Presink
    Popeye is determined to buy Olive a bear-skin coat for her birthday, but all furrier G. Geezil can offer him is a knockoff coat made of rabbit. Thus, Popeye purchases a gun and goes bear-hunting in the woods. Unfortunately, the sailor man falls victim to a prankish bear who plays on soft-hearted Popeye's "symphonies" to avoid getting shot, then subjects our hero to a humiliating trouncing. But Popeye ultimately triumphs and gets his bear skin...or does he? This cartoon was partially remade at Warner Bros. as Duck Soup to Nuts, also scripted by Tedd Pierce. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Olive's Sweepstakes Ticket
    After receiving a phone call that she holds a winning sweepstakes ticket (number 86252), Olive Oyl frantically searches her house to find the missing ticket, forcing Popeye to join the search. Ultimately, the ticket is recovered--only to be dropped out of an open window. Forced to chases after the valuable ticket, Popeye manages to run afoul of a haughty female pedestrian, a speeding car, a playful fish and a gang of tough guys at the "Slap-Happy Gym." In the end, Olive gets her prize--but Popeye is left with nothing but a case of "apoplexy." This cartoon features a cameo by Twinkletoes, the goofy-looking carrier pigeon introduced in the 1939 Fleischer animated feature Gulliver's Travels. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Nix on Hypnotricks
    Frustrated over a lack of customers, sinister hypnotist I. Stare decides to pick a name from the phone book and put that person under a hypnotic spell. Turns out that the name he chooses is Olive Oyl, who immediately upon answering the phone goes into a trance and begins walking helplessly toward Stare's office. While Popeye frantically pursues the mesmerizing Olive all over town, the poor girl unknowingly walks to the top of several skyscrapers, and ultimately to the skeleton of a building under construction. In a last ditch rescue effort, Popeye downs his spinach--and turns into Superman! This cartoon brilliantly manages to invoke memories of the 1934 classic A Dream Walking without repeating any of the key gags from the earlier effort. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    I'll Never Crow Again
    When her vegetable garden is invaded by a pack of cocky crows, Olive tries to shoo them away, only to be pelted with tomatoes for her trouble. Summoning Popeye, Olive orders him to get rid of the crows, but his efforts--including impersonating a scarecrow--prove no more successful. Caught between the taunting of the clever crows and the hysterical laughter of Olive Oyl whenever his latest plan fails, Popeye finally goes stark-staring mad. The bizarre ending of this cartoon is both savage and satisfying, and completely at odds with anything else in the saga of Popeye and Olive Oyl. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Problem Pappy
    Popeye is slowly being driven crazy by his 99-year-old Pappy's second childhood. The limit finally comes when, while desperately searching for his Pappy all over town, Popeye discovers that the old man has taken a flagpole-sitting job atop a towering skyscraper. His efforts to "rescue" his dear old dad nearly prove fatal to Popeye as Pappy sadistically continues to sabotage his son. Finally, a huge electrical storm (with the usual "humanized" lightning bolts) forces Pappy to realize that he's in the wrong line of work. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Popeye Meets Rip Van Winkle
    Wandering through a quaint Swiss village, Popeye comes face to face with the legendary archer William Tell. When Popeye asks "Where's your son?", Tell sheepishly admits that he recently got into an argument with the boy and shot him from under an apple (A closeup of a photograph reveals that Tell's dear departed son is none other than Groucho Marx). On cue, the despotic dictator Gessler appears and demands that Tell repeat his famous apple-shooting routine with his son immediately--or face the headman's axe. To save Tell from a grisly demise, Popeye poses as the bowman's son...with hilarious results. Not surprisingly, this cartoon's musical score is dominated by Rossini's "William Tell Overture"; what IS surprising is that no one yells "Hi Yo, Silver." ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Quiet! Pleeze
    No synopsis available.

    Flies Ain't Human
    While trying to take an afternoon nap, Popeye is pestered by a pack of pesky houseflies. Using "pipe power",he manages to shoo most of the insect away, but one particularly persistent fly remains behind. Fed up with the fly's pranks, Popeye knocks his little nemesis into the kitchen--and directly into an open can of spinach. Galvanized by the green vegetable, the flight embarks upon a major assault against Popeye, leading to chaos, destruction. . .and a square dance? Flies Ain't Human was remade in color in 1949 as The Fly's Last Flight. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    The Mighty Navy
    Wearing his familiar all-white uniform for the first time, veteran sailor Popeye has joined the U.S. Navy in anticipation of WW2. Alas, the old salt cannot adjust to the modern Navy, infuriating his Admiral by messing up the ship's anchor, a flying lesson, and a session with the "big guns." But Popeye redeems himself when a fleet of enemy vessels (unidentified, since America was still neutral) attacks his ship. The closing scene was quite up-to-date in 1941, since the US Navy's Bomber Squadron actually did adopt a picture of Popeye (wearing his old "captain" outfit) as their official insignia. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Me Musical Nephews
    On furlough from WW2, Popeye hopes to get some rest and relaxation at home, but his four nephews insist upon keeping him awake with a musical concert. Finally managing to bundle his nephews off to bed, Popeye settles down for a good night's sleep. Meanwhile, the four bored nephews discover that various items in their bedroom can be converted into musical instruments--and the result is a loud, swinging midnight jam session, much to Uncle Popeye's dismay. This exquisitely timed and paced black-and-white "Popeye" cartoon was later remade in color, scene for scene, as Riot in Rhythm (1950). ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Many Tanks
    Attached to the Army Tank Corps, G.I. Bluto cooks up several schemes to go AWOL, all of which fail spectacularly. Spotting his sailor pal Popeye, who is en route to his girl friend Olive Oyl, Bluto shanghais Popeye and steals his uniform. Left in Bluto's ill-fitting Army duds, Popeye is forced to undertake a training course in the proper operation of a tank, leading to the expected chaos and confusion. Finally downing a can of spinach, Popeye hops into his tank and leads the rest of the Army on a merry chase as he races to settle accounts with the duplicitous Bluto. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    You're a Sap, Mr. Jap
    No synopsis available.

    Baby Wants a Bottleship
    While Olive goes shopping, she leaves baby Swee'pea in the care of Navy man Popeye, currently assigned to the gigantic battleship Pennsyltucky. To amuse the kid, Popeye whittles a small boat, but Swee'pea is far more interested in exploring the battleship. Sure enough, Swee'pea slips away and climbs on board the vessel, with a frantic Popeye in hot pursuit. Though Swee'pea climbs up the crow's nest, gets entangled in the workings of the big guns, and crawls down the anchor chain, it is invariably Popeye who suffers all the abuse (this is the cartoon in which, after a particularly humiliating injury, Popeye mutters "It should happen to Hitler." Ultimately, Swee'pea finds himself astride a runaway torpedo, while a frantic Olive attempts to revive the unconscious Popeye with some extra-crispy spinach. This was the last "Popeye" cartoon produced by the Fleischer brothers. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Alona on the Sarong Seas
    No synopsis available.

    A Hull of a Mess
    No synopsis available.

    Scrap the Japs
    No synopsis available.

    Pipeye, Pupeye, Poopeye & Peepeye
    Popeye prepares dinner for his lookalike nephews Pip-eye, Pup-eye, Poop-eye and Peep-eye. The kids get through the soup all right, but when Popeye serves up four plates of spinach, his nephews try to sneak out and go fishing. In a strenuous effort to convince the boys to eat their spinach, Popeye demonstrates how the leafy green vegetable has helped "Powderewski" become a brilliant pianist, "Fred Upstairs" to become a world-class dancer, and "Jack Jumpsey" to be a champion prizefighter. Alas, the kids are unimpressed, forcing Popeye to punish them. Inevitably, the kids down their spinach, whereupon they set about to teach Popeye a few lessons of their own. This is the last "Popeye" cartoon in which the leading man appears in his traditional costume: thereafter, he'd been seen almost exclusively in Navy Whites. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Kickin' the Conga 'round
    On shore leave in South America, Popeye looks forward to visiting his girlfirend Olivia Oyla--actually Olive Oyl with an accent and darker skin--but his shipmate Bluto (wearing Navy whites for the first time) appropriates the senorita's phone number and beats Popeye to the punch. After a lively one-upsmanship session between Popeye and Bluto, Popeye escorts Olivia to the "Café La Conga", where everyone--including the waiters--moves to the rhythmic beat of the energetic bandleader (so energetic that one of his on-stage gyrations is censored!) Alas, Popeye doesn't dance, but Bluto does, and as his rival escorts Olive to the dance floor, all our hero can do is look on longily as he eats a can of spinach. But lo! The green vegetable turns Popeye into a conga dancer extraordinaire, leading to a truly memorable climax in which Olivia is ignored while Popeye and Bluto punctuate their dance (yes, their dance) with a series of bone-shattering punches. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Olive Oyl and Water Don't Mix
    Sailors Popeye and Bluto have agreed to swear off "dames" forever--but all this changes when civilian Olive Oyl (in a most becoming picture hat) arrives on board their battleship for a tour of the facilities. The two sailors quickly return to form, literally pummelling each other for the privilege of escorting Olive. . .and this time, it is our heroine who gets the worst of it. But the payoff occurs when, at the climax of a running gag, Olive opens a door misleading marked "Powder Room"--and light a match. There's no spinach in this one, but there's merry mayhem aplenty. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Fleets of Stren'th
    No synopsis available.

    Blunder Below
    Old salt Popeye is still having trouble adjusting to the Wartime navy. He is particularly incompetent when it comes to working the "big guns" on the battleship to which he has been assigned. But our hero redeems himself when he single-handled defeats an attacking Japanese submarine, prompting the entire Navy to literally sing Popeye's phrases. The notorious running gag in which a buck-toothed Japanese officer pops his head out of the sub and says "So solly!" has been cut from most TV prints and the colorized version of this black-and-white cartoon. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Cartoons Ain't Human
    No synopsis available.

    The Hungry Goat
    No synopsis available.

    Wood-Peckin'
    No synopsis available.

    Happy Birthdaze
    No synopsis available.

    Spinach Fer Britain
    No synopsis available.

    A Jolly Good Furlough
    No synopsis available.

    Too Weak to Work
    No synopsis available.

    Seein' Red, White 'N' Blue
    No synopsis available.

    Ration Fer the Duration
    No synopsis available.

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