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Pure Terror: 50 Movies [12 Discs] (Boxed Set) (DVD) (Black & White) (Eng)

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    Synopsis

    Includes:
  • Green Eyes (1934)
  • Scared to Death (1947), MPAA Rating: NR
  • Evil Brain From Outer Space (1956)
  • Night of the Blood Beast (1958)
  • The Tell-Tale Heart (1960)
  • The Amazing Transparent Man (1960)
  • Anatomy of a Psycho (1961)
  • The Manster (1961)
  • The Sadist (1963)
  • Dungeon of Harrow (1964)
  • The Bloody Pit of Horror (1965)
  • They Saved Hitler's Brain (1966)
  • The Undertaker and His Pals (1966), MPAA Rating: R
  • Manos, the Hands of Fate (1966)
  • The Monster of Venice (1966)
  • Terror Creatures from the Grave (1966)
  • Terror in the Jungle (1968)
  • Night Fright (1968)
  • Fangs of the Living Dead (1968), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Crucible of Horror (1969), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Una Vela Para El Diablo (1970)
  • The House That Screamed (1970), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Dr. Jekyll y el Hombre Lobo (1971), MPAA Rating: R
  • Point of Terror (1971), MPAA Rating: R
  • The Night Evelyn Came out of the Grave (1971), MPAA Rating: R
  • The Devil's Nightmare (1971), MPAA Rating: R
  • Guru, the Mad Monk (1971)
  • Horror Rises from the Tomb (1972)
  • Grave of the Vampire (1972), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Frankenstein 80 (1972)
  • Blood Sabbath (1972)
  • The Curse of Bigfoot (1972)
  • Edgar Allan Poe's The Oval Portrait (1972)
  • The Vampires' Night Orgy (1973), MPAA Rating: R
  • The Werewolf of Washington (1973)
  • Night of Bloody Horror (1974), MPAA Rating: R
  • Devil's Possessed (1974)
  • The Thirsty Dead (1974), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Satan's Slave (1976), MPAA Rating: R
  • The Eerie Midnight Horror Show (1978), MPAA Rating: R
  • Don't Answer the Phone (1980), MPAA Rating: R
  • Monster (1980), MPAA Rating: R
  • Keep My Grave Open (1980), MPAA Rating: R
  • The House by the Cemetery (1981), MPAA Rating: R
  • Double Exposure (1982), MPAA Rating: R
  • Death Warmed Up (1983)
  • Mutant (1983), MPAA Rating: R
  • Death in the Shadows (1985)
  • Hands of Steel (1986), MPAA Rating: R
  • My Mom's a Werewolf (1989), MPAA Rating: PG

    Green Eyes
    Based on H. Ashbrook's novel The Murder of Stephen Kester, Green Eyes gets off to a powerful start when host Stephen Kester (Claude Gillingwater) is found stabbed in a closet during a weekend masquerade party. The principal suspects are Kester's daughter Jean (Shirley Grey) and her fiancé Cliff (William Bakewell), whose planned marriage had been violently opposed by Jean's father. One of the party guests, mystery writer Bill Tracy (Charles Starrett), suggests to Inspector Crofton (John Wray) that there were others who wanted to see Kester dead, notably his business associates Pritchard (Alden Chase) and Hall (Arthur Clayton). When Hall commits suicide, leaving a note confessing to the murder, Crofton is satisfied -- but Tracy isn't. The "gimmick" in this well-crafted independent meller is its double-edged ending, in which two logical conclusions to the case are offered, each cancelling the other out. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Scared to Death
    Completed several years before its 1947 release, Scared to Death is historically important as Bela Lugosi's only color film (outside of his brief unbilled appearance in 1931's Fifty Million Frenchmen, which today exists only in black & white). Other than that, it's a dreary story of how a beautiful but treacherous young woman (Molly Lamont) literally dies of fright. Anticipating Sunset Boulevard by at least five years, the film is narrated by the deceased "heroine", meaning that suspense and surprise are hardly considerations here. It's a toss-up as to who's funnier: the film's official comedy relief, dumb detective Nat Pendleton and dumber blonde Joyce Compton, or the "odd couple" team of the caped-and-cloaked Bela Lugosi and his dress-alike dwarf companion Angelo Rossitto. For the record, Lugosi plays a sinister hypnotist named Leonide, yet another of his myriad of "red herring" roles in the 1940s. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Evil Brain From Outer Space
    This Japanese sci-fi film, ostensibly a sequel to Attack from Space, is actually re-edited episodes from a Japanese TV serial, Super Giant. It tells of the adventures of the chrome-plated man of steel, Starman, and how he saves the planet Earth from the ravages of intergalactic evildoers. ~ Brian Gusse, Rovi

    Night of the Blood Beast
    The familiar rocks and rills of LA's Bronson Caverns are seen to good advantage in Night of the Blood Beast. The story begins when a manned space rocket develops trouble and plummets back to earth, apparently killing its occupant, Major John Corcoran (Michael Emmet). Unfortunately, Corcoran's body has become a breeding ground of extraterrestrial embryos, picked up while the rocket was in outer space. The tiny monsters grow and multiply, and before long Corcoran revives from the dead, literally impregnated by the alien beasts. After this promising and decidedly unorthodox buildup, the film goes downhill, settling for standard eek-eek shocks and a most unconvincing "blood beast", whose costume wouldn't have even passed muster at a Halloween party. Still, Night of the Blood Beast is at least half of a good, well-constructed horror flick. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    The Tell-Tale Heart
    Horror tale inspired by the classic Edgar Allan Poe story, in which a writer fantasizes murdering his friend over a beautiful woman, and then hearing the dead man's heart continuing to beat. (Alternate title: The Hidden Room Of 1,000 Horrors) ~ Nicole Gagne, Rovi

    The Amazing Transparent Man
    This appallingly bad sci-fi film about an invisible bank-robber (Douglas Kennedy) was shot back-to-back with Beyond the Time Barrier on the grounds of the Texas State Fair in Dallas. The usual cackling and crime is included, most of which was done better in The Invisible Man. Marguerite Chapman is the film's one bright spot as Kennedy's lowlife girlfriend, but the rest of the characters are annoying and unsympathetic. Unpleasant, downbeat, and badly produced, it is hard to see the appeal of this one, even for genre completists. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi

    Anatomy of a Psycho
    In this extremely low-budget exploitation film, directed and produced by Boris Petroff (as Brooke L. Peters), a psychotic killer murders all who were supposedly involved in his brother's execution. This seedy, bloody film attempts to capitalize on the success of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho, which has been released the previous year. Indifferently directed, with a cast of unknowns, Anatomy of a Psycho has little to recommend it. ~ Linda Rasmussen, Rovi

    The Manster
    Manster is a favorite among campy horror aficionados and for good reason as it is both unintentionally funny and genuinely creepy. A "Manster" is half-man, half-monster. To accommodate this set-up, the title character has two heads. Back in his single-domed days, the Manster was an American reporter (Peter Dyneley) assigned to interview a Tokyo-based scientist (Satoshi Nakamura). Alas, the scientist was off his rocker, and while experimenting with mutations, he turned the reporter into a double-header. Wait till you see the climax, with the hero battling himself on the edge of a live volcano. Though filmed in Japan, The Manster was based on a script by British producer George Breakston, and acted (if that is the word) entirely in English. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    The Sadist
    If you want to truly be scared out of your socks, we strongly recommend the hellishly horrific low-budgeter Profile of Terror. Arch Hall Jr., heretofore the colorless star of such cheapies as Wild Guitar and Eegah!, is disturbingly convincing as a sadistic thrill killer. When three schoolteachers (Richard Alden, Marilyn Manning and Don Russell), en route to an LA Dodgers game, pull up at a deserted gas station, they are held captive by Hall and his wacko girlfriend Helen Hovey. Harboring a psychotic hatred of teachers, Hall gleefully torments his prisoners, killing Russell while the latter is on his knees, begging for his life. Every time we think that this film can't get any more agonizing, the insanely giggling Hall pulls off yet another outrage. By the time Hall faces his well-deserved demise, you'll be hard pressed not to jump out of your chair and scream "Get him! GET HIM!!!" Stunningly photographed by Vilmos Zsigmond, Profile of Terror may well be the greatest exploitation flick ever made (and we're taking into consideration Night of the Living Dead). The film is better known by its original title, The Sadist. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Dungeon of Harrow
    A ship carrying traveller Aaron Fallon (Russ Harvey) is wrecked off the coast of a strange, uncharted island. Only Fallon and the ship's captain (Henry Garcia) survive, and they soon find themselves in the clutches of the mad Count DeSade (Bill McNulty), who is keeping his insane, diseased wife (Eunice Grey) in the dungeon below the castle in which he lives. The count is deranged and hallucinating, and prepared to inflict terrible tortures on anyone he believes threatens him or his solitude -- the two shipwreck victims and a mute servant girl (her tongue cut out by pirates) soon find themselves in that position. A lot of violence ensues, amid much dialogue that's fairly incomprehensible on a logical level but which works in the sense of being generically horrific. Fallon and Cassandra, a servant (Helen Hogan), are the only survivors, and they await rescue, not knowing that they're already doomed to a terrible fate. ~ Bruce Eder, Rovi

    The Bloody Pit of Horror
    Ex-Mr. Universe Mickey Hargitay plays the thick, musclebound host for the evil spirit of the notorious "Crimson Executioner," a sadistic Italian Baron in whose former castle Hargitay and a collection of sexy models are staging a Gothic-themed photo shoot. Before long, the sweaty brute is hauling the poor lasses into the dungeon to have at them with a wide assortment of torture devices. The film's ad slicks proudly proclaim this Euro-cheapie as being "Based on the works of the Marquis de Sade." Although this statement is pretty unlikely, it's still hard to refute: Who's to say a movie depicting the torture of numerous scantily-clad ladies isn't something the Marquis wouldn't heartily endorse? Authentic or not, it's certainly a sleazy little film, notable only for the novelty presence of Hargitay (Jane Mansfield's husband). Video-seekers can take their pick from a wide assortment of alternate titles: Bloody Pit of Horror, The Crimson Executioner, The Scarlet Executioner, Virgins for the Hangman and probably half a dozen others. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    They Saved Hitler's Brain
    After his head is surgically removed and sustained, Hitler is, essentially, still alive and living on an island in the Caribbean. When a young woman and her husband goes in search of her scientist-father and sister, they find a group of Nazis--still under the command of Der Fuhrer--who plan to resume their atrocities upon humanity in a scheme of world domination. ~ Kristie Hassen, Rovi

    The Undertaker and His Pals
    An enterprising undertaker forms an unholy alliance with the owner of a diner in this low-budget exploitation horror film. Macabre humor and terror is combined as the victims of a small town down South are served human flesh at the diner. One of the deceased was named Susie Lamb, and soon the menu advertises leg of lamb as the culinary special of the day. The undertaker takes advantage of the bereaved and charges exorbitant prices for his services before processing their loved ones into lunch meat. ~ Dan Pavlides, Rovi

    Manos, the Hands of Fate
    A family vacation to Texas turns into a waking nightmare when they have a deadly run-in with Satanists fond of using human hands as sacrificial offerings. It's as grim as it sounds. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    The Monster of Venice
    This low-budget Italian production (originally titled Il Mostro di Venezia, or The Monster of Venice) features a psychotic would-be mortician -- clad in a monk's cassock and a death mask -- who effortlessly navigates the catacombs beneath the canals of Venice in order to stalk attractive female prey, later preserving his victim's bodies with embalming fluid for display in his subterranean dungeon. The film's would-be hero is a journalist who races to stop the fiend before the heroine joins his taxidermic collection. The only known feature from writer-director Dino Tavella, this sleazy-looking but basically tame thriller was a perennial drive-in fave, often paired with the equally inept horror quickie The Screaming Skull. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    Terror Creatures from the Grave
    An unfaithful wife is visited by medieval plague victims, who were summoned from their graves by her occult-expert husband. ~ Rovi

    Terror in the Jungle
    In this far-fetched jungle adventure, a young boy is put on a plane for a visit to his estranged mother. When the plane crashes in the Amazon jungle, the blonde boy is considered a god by the Incan Indians. One of the high priests wishes to sacrifice the boy in a religious ritual, believing the young boy to be evil because he smiles. His father and a group of Catholic missionaries save the boy from death with the evil Indian running through the jungle to escape. The boy's stuffed toy tiger becomes real and hunts down the Incan priest in an attempt to rip the flesh from his villainous bones for scaring the boy. ~ Dan Pavlides, Rovi

    Night Fright
    This obscure horror movie is a remake of an even more obscure horror movie, 1964's The Demon From Devil's Lake. The sheriff of a small Texas town investigates when a serial killer starts bumping off female students at a local college. He discovers that the murderer is not a serial killer at all, but a hideous monster, the result of a botched NASA experiment. ~ Brian Gusse, Rovi

    Fangs of the Living Dead
    This low-budget Spanish-Italian co-production was the handiwork of cult filmmaker Amando De Ossorio, best known for his series of Knights Templar zombie films which began with La Noche del Terror Ciego (1971). Faded '50s bombshell Anita Ekberg stars as Silvia, a young woman who travels to the family castle which she will soon inherit. When she arrives, she meets her uncle (Julian Ugarte), who gives her some rather disheartening news. Many years before, a nun named Malenka was burned as a witch in the town square and swore to return for revenge. Silvia looks just like Malenka, and the villagers are terrified that the witch's spirit has been reincarnated in her. Soon, villagers start dying, and Silvia is so sure that she is possessed that she breaks off her engagement, convinced that she is destined to kill her beloved (Gianni Medici). Naturally, as the title already gives away, the blood-drinking attacks are part of a plot by Ugarte to drive Silvia mad and steal her inheritance. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi

    Crucible of Horror
    This tepid thriller features a sullen Michael Gough as an overbearing, sadistic banker whose favorite hobby appears to be beating the tar out of his terrified wife (Yvonne Mitchell) and daughter (Sharon Gurney). In a ham-fisted spin on Diabolique, the two women resolve to murder the old coot while on a family outing and disguise his death as a suicide. Their plans turn awry, however, when their alleged victim apparently refuses to give up the ghost. Gough turns in an excellent performance as the hate-worthy hubby, and there are a good number of effective chills, but overall the film is bogged down somewhat by dreary dialogue scenes and a pointlessly convoluted climax. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    Una Vela Para El Diablo
    In this thriller, a woman searches for an estranged relative. Trouble ensues when the traveler stops at a tiny Spanish roadhouse owned by two twisted sisters. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    The House That Screamed
    This stylishly eerie Spanish production stars elegant Lili Palmer as the severe headmistress of a French boarding school for young women, where the rigid constraints of 19th-century social conditioning have turned the place into a hothouse of barely contained sexual urges (leading to lots of gauzy shots of the girls slinking about in their nightgowns). Into this heady mix is introduced Palmer's deranged son (John Moulder Brown), whose frustrated desires have forced his latent psychotic urges to the surface, compelling him to stalk the hapless boarders in the hope of acquiring body parts for a horrific human jigsaw puzzle. Quite intense for its time, this film represented a new boldness in style among European thrillers which would reach its peak during the 1970s. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    Dr. Jekyll y el Hombre Lobo
    The title says it all: This time young Dr. Jekyll (Jack Taylor), the grandson of the more famous one, must contend with a werewolf (Paul Naschy) rather than grandpa's bestial alter ego Mr. Hyde. Well, that's not quite accurate. What happens here is that the werewolf seeks out a cure for his lycanthropy from Jekyll. The good doctor pumps him full of a serum that turns the wolfman into Mr. Hyde. Even worse, this Hyde is an S&M freak, seeking out beautiful women for the purposes of bondage and torture. Jeckyll wants to put an end to all this, but he is prevented from doing so by his insane lab assistant. By 1971, baying at the moon and growing an inordinate amount of facial hair was old hat to the ubiquitous Paul Naschy. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Point of Terror
    In this low-budget drama, an aspiring rocker makes bad choices in his desperate bid for stardom. His first mistake is to agree to dump his loyal lover and embark upon a tawdry affair with a music publisher's wife. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    The Night Evelyn Came out of the Grave
    Spaghetti Western veteran Antonio De Teffe (aka Anthony Steffen) stars in this delightfully tacky supernatural giallo from Italian filmmaker Emilio P. Miraglia. De Teffe plays Alan Cunningham, a titled nobleman who has just been released from a mental institution after a breakdown brought about by the death of his beautiful red-haired wife, Evelyn. Alan isn't quite right, and despite loads of helpful advice from his doctor and money-hungry cousin, can't stop picking up red-haired women and dragging them back to his castle dungeon, where his desire to punish his late wife's infidelity leads to some hallucinatory S & M murders. Eventually he meets the beautiful Gladys (Marina Malfatti) and quickly marries her, generating a good deal of anger among his greedy relatives. That's when members of his family start disappearing and the obligatory inheritance plot tightens around the deranged lord, raising the question of whether Evelyn is really dead after all. Miraglia directs with a somewhat plodding style atypical for the normally lively genre, but the film's cheese value is enhanced by a wonderfully schizophrenic score by Bruno Nicolai; an amusingly dotty production design; and enough sex, kinkiness, and violence to satisfy any giallo fan. Erika Blanc (aka Enrica Bianchi Colombatto) makes an impression as one of the strippers Alan brings to his dungeon, Alan's dead aunt (Joan C. Davies) is devoured by a cageful of hungry foxes, and the cast also includes familiar genre faces Umberto Raho and Giacomo Rossi-Stuart. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi

    The Devil's Nightmare
    This seedy but effective little supernatural thriller involves a group of seven travelers -- each of whom represents one of the Seven Deadly Sins -- who take shelter in a mysterious baron's haunted castle, where they are visited in turn by a seductive, lingerie-clad succubus (Erika Blanc), who metes out suitable punishment in accordance with their evil deeds. It is revealed that their enigmatic host is a former Nazi general whose family's Satanic legacy includes the birth of a malevolent she-demon into each generation. Only the token priest of the group manages to stand up to the evil forces. A Belgian/Italian co-production; also released as The Succubus, The Devil's Longest Night, Castle of Death and The Devil Walks at Midnight. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    Guru, the Mad Monk
    Also known as Garu, the Mad Monk, this baroque horror effort was filmed in, of all places, Saint Peter's Church in the heart of New York City. Neil Flanagan plays the title character, a chaplain at a prison colony. Abusing his power to the utmost, Flanagan wields a supernatural hold over the unfortunate prisoners. When he's not busy dispatching his slaves to go grave robbing, the Mad Monk is commiserating with his AC-DC mistress and an assortment of ghoulies, ghosties and long-legged beasties. Producer-director-writer Andy Milligan based his screenplay on a short story by M.A. Isaacs. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Horror Rises from the Tomb
    Spanish horror star Jacinto Molina, best known as Paul Naschy, stars in this bloody horror film from gore specialist Carlos Aured. Molina plays a knight who is decapitated and whose wife is cut in half, cursing his descendents when they come to the old mansion looking for his head. The knight's head is rejoined to his body, his wife (Cristina Suriani) is revived, and much mayhem follows. A maid has her head lopped off with a sickle, Suriani rips flesh from a man's back during sex, and zombies emerge from a nearby lake. Aured throws everything but the kitchen sink into this violent pastiche, but the engaging cast (including horror regulars Helga Line, Emma Cohen, and Vic Winner) and some creative touches make it worth seeing for Naschy devotees. One of the best Spanish horror films, this was the first effort of the nascent Profilmes production company, which turned out numerous genre efforts over the ensuing years. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi

    Grave of the Vampire
    This dark, violent British production stars Michael Pataki as a brutish vampire apparently lacking in Dracula's powers of seduction, since he finds it necessary to brutally rape a young woman (Kitty Vallacher) in order to sire a child. The product of this unholy mating is a half-human, half-vampire baby boy, bottle-fed on the blood of his now-insane mother (a truly sickening sight) until her eventual death from anemia. Later as a young man, the son (William Smith) is able to spend short periods in daylight, and his bloodlust is considerably lesser than that of his father. Tormented nevertheless by his evil condition, he curses his bloodline and defies his vampire heritage, tracking his father down to the university where he teaches occult sciences. Aside from Pataki's coarse but imposing performance, this low-budget film is a fairly routine genre entry, but the climactic, bloody duel between father and son vampires is quite gripping. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    Frankenstein 80
    This Italian production stars Gordon Mitchell as the modern-day monster-maker, who appropriately dubs his bald, lumbering patchwork creation "Mosaico." After the creature's escape from the lab, the plot seldom deviates from scene after scene of the scar-faced behemoth disemboweling women and bashing in people's heads with a leg-bone. Despite the participation of makeup effects master Carlo Rambaldi (who would bring E.T. to life ten years later), production values are virtually nonexistent. Essentially an exploitive slasher scenario with a man-made killer, this sleazy mess has about as much to do with Mary Shelley's legendary tale as a box of Frankenberry cereal. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    Blood Sabbath
    No synopsis available.

    The Curse of Bigfoot
    This film is comprised of a hoary monster movie from the early '60s with new footage tacked on to the beginning and end. The framing story is set in a high school classroom where an old teacher, discussing the limitations of knowledge, tells them a strange tale from his youth about how he and some friends once found odd remains in an Indian burial ground, and how, once they went to investigate further, found the sacred site was guarded by a scary monster. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Edgar Allan Poe's The Oval Portrait
    This low-budget Mexican production (originally produced for television) is a tepid but fairly accurate adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe's tale, set during the Civil War. The story involves a young woman haunted by the vengeful spirit of a young bride, whose soul had been trapped for decades within the woman's portrait (painted by her insane husband). The occasionally rich period atmosphere is flattened almost completely by sluggish pacing, badly-dubbed (and equally dull) dialogue, and an insolvent ending which may lead the viewer to believe the filmmakers have lost a few pages of Poe's original text. The entire affair plays like one of Roger Corman's Poe adaptations -- albeit staged without humor, style or verve. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    The Vampires' Night Orgy
    This Spanish horror film (which has developed a cult following among Eurotrash enthusiasts) follows a group of itinerant workers who travel to a small village where they've been told domestic workers are in great demand. However, when their bus driver dies along the way, several begin to suspect that something odd is going on, and while the new arrivals are welcomed with open arms, enough seems amiss that many of the group are certain of foul play. As it turns out, the newcomers have every right to be suspicious, as they've been lured into a village populated entirely by hungry cannibals and thirsty vampires. Orgy of the Vampires was directed by Leon Klimovsky, who also helmed several of Paul Naschy's werewolf outings, with Jack Taylor in the leading role. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

    The Werewolf of Washington
    After being unknowingly inflicted with the bite of a werewolf while on a visit to Europe, White House press secretary Jack Whittier (Dean Stockwell) begins to turn into a deadly beast by night, terrorizing Washington D.C. and presenting a very deadly threat to the President. ~ Iotis Erlewine, Rovi

    Night of Bloody Horror
    This lurid meat-clever murder movie tells the story of a former mental patient accused of hacking up beautiful women, all of whom were his former lovers. The promos of the film were said to be more inspired than the picture itself. Filmmakers glorified in the gory scenes saying the film was filmed in "Violent Vision"; while television commercials offered $1,000 to the family's of viewers who dropped dead of fright, as well as claiming that many scenes were too violent to show on the commercials. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Devil's Possessed
    When the campesinos of a medieval overlord can stand his tyrannical rule no longer, they revolt with terrible vengeance. ~ John Bush, Rovi

    The Thirsty Dead
    In order to maintain their youth, vampiric jungle freaks kidnap and sacrifice pretty young things in this horror/thriller. ~ Kristie Hassen, Rovi

    Satan's Slave
    Michael Gough once more goes the horror-movie route in the British Satan's Slave. Gough plays the head of a coven of witches. He roams the countryside in search of new minions for the Dark Prince. A fiery climax caps this standard effort. Satan's Slave received but minimal theatrical play in the US, though it became a fixture of "Shock Theatre" TV manifests. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    The Eerie Midnight Horror Show
    This twisted Italian oddity, originally titled L'Odessa, is an incomprehensible muddle of Devil-possession horror and lots of kinky soft-core sex (its original U.S. title was The Sexorcist). The story revolves around a weird religious icon -- depicting one of the two thieves crucified with Christ -- and the demonic sexual influence it exerts on a young art student (Stella Carnacina). After a gory dream sequence in which the woman imagines herself being nailed to a cross herself, the statue eventually comes to life and begins to sexually torment her ... whereupon the entire film careens off-track into Exorcist territory, where it slogs for an uninvolving and unoriginal final hour. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    Don't Answer the Phone
    This mix of drama, camp, and brutal violence is anchored by the performance of Nicholas Worth. Worth plays Kurt Smith, a sweaty, balding maniac who strangles women with a stocking, raping and mutilating them during and after death. A Vietnam veteran, Smith prowls the streets of Hollywood posing as a photographer, then sells his violent porn to sleazy smut-peddler Sam (Porky's star Chuck Mitchell). At home, Smith lifts weights and tells off his dead father, whose abuse was obviously one cause of his mania. Sometimes he calls the radio show of psychiatrist Lindsey Gale (Flo Gerrish), posing as a Puerto Rican named Ramon and asking for advice about his headaches. Dedicated cop McCabe (James Westmoreland) has no luck solving the case until Smith murders one of Dr. Gale's patients, in an unforgivably sick scene. The patient (Paula Warner) was molested by her father, which Smith overhears. When he breaks into her house that night, Smith ties her up while cooing, "Daddy loves his little girl," and pouring hot wax on her as she cries into her teddy-bear. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi

    Monster
    A delightfully horribly sci-fi horror outing, Monster is the story of young people whose lives are placed in jeopardy by the presence of a gigantic prehistoric lake monster created from toxic waste. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Keep My Grave Open
    This unsettling but moody low-budget psycho-thriller -- a drive-in version of Repulsion with a Southern Gothic flavor -- stars the eerie-looking Camilla Carr as a demented young recluse who believes herself to be possessed by the spirit of her long-lost brother (who is presumed dead), and slays any man who makes sexual advances toward her -- usually running them through with a sword. Her dementia intensifies, leading her to take her own life by chewing on broken glass (a particularly unsettling scene). The chief plot twist and subsequent dramatic punchline -- involving the brother's true identity and whereabouts -- is a long time coming, but fairly satisfying nonetheless. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    The House by the Cemetery
    This cult horror film from director Lucio Fulci lurches along with a certain amount of disjunction due to cutting, perhaps, if not to an innate Fulci disposition. When the Boyle family temporarily moves into a mansion near Boston so the father can do some research, the son Bob (Giovanni Frezza) starts seeing the ghost of a young girl motioning to him, and eventually he discovers the basement's terrible secret. A certain Dr. Freudstein (Giovanni de Nari) has been hanging out there since 1879 when he was banned from the medical profession, and he has kept himself alive although in miserable physical shape, by murdering the various inhabitants of the house and using their cells to keep his body going. An oversize bat attacks the father, floors come apart and crush unsuspecting victims, and at one point little Bob's blond head is held to the basement door by the evil doctor while the father is wildly swinging his axe through the door to save his son. Scenes like these and others are the real objective of the movie -- the strange and irresolute ending, and leaps and gaps in the plot, are indications that all else is dispensible pretext - gore is the goal and it is delivered in sickening doses. ~ Eleanor Mannikka, Rovi

    Double Exposure
    Double Exposure is a dull, predictable mystery thriller with a fine cast but hampered by a poor script and bad direction and production. A photographer (Michael Callan) begins to have a series of nightmares concerning bloody, gruesome murders. When those murders become reality, he is the prime suspect and must find the real killer. The cast including Joanna Pettet, James Stacy, Cleavon Little, Sally Kirkland and Seymour Cassel, makes the most of their underwritten and poorly developed characters, but producer/director/writer William Byron Hillman substitutes nudity and lurid, gory special effects for both plot and character. Viewers looking for an interesting thriller based on the same premise might enjoy The Eyes of Laura Mars, and not waste their time with this plodding rip-off. ~ Linda Rasmussen, Rovi

    Death Warmed Up
    This funky and intelligent sci-fi-horror sleeper from New Zealand features Gary Day as the maniacal Dr. Howell, director of the Trans-Cranial Applications Hospital, who conducts bizarre brain experiments in a subterranean laboratory on a remote island -- most of which backfire and turn his patients into murderous zombie slaves. Onto this island of weirdness ventures a group of youths -- including the troubled son (Michael Hurst) of the doctor's former scientific rival, whom the mad doc had hypnotized into murdering his father several years ago. The resulting confrontations between the dirtbike-riding kids and armies of rampaging mutants are action-packed and splattery as all get-out. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    Mutant
    A muscular pair of Yankee brothers visit a backwater Georgia town and end up involved with rednecked mutant zombies. The campy horror begins when brother Mike suddenly disappears. Puzzled brother Josh, with the help of Sheriff Will Stewart and schoolmarm Holly begin a desperate search. Unfortunately more trouble ensues when they find that toxic waste has transformed their normally peaceable neighbors into scary monsters. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Death in the Shadows
    The protagonist of Death in the Shadows is a young woman seeking to discover the motive behind her mother's murder after finding out that she was not the woman's natural daughter. In pursuit of that goal, she must avoid assasination herself. Death in the Shadows was filmed in Holland, its attractive backgrounds jarring dramatically with its bursts of violence. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hands of Steel
    In a complex sci-fi tale set at some point in the not-too-distant future, an evil industrialist named Francis Turner (John Saxon) has created Paco Querak (Daniel Greene), a cyborg who is 70% robot and 30% human. Paco has been programmed to murder a blind ecologist whose environmental activism does not sit well with Turner's bottom-line motivation. But once he is set up to do his job, the 30% human component in Paco only permits him to injure the ecologist, not kill him. With the local police (and eventually just about everyone else) after him, Paco detours to Arizona to look for his true identity. ~ Eleanor Mannikka, Rovi

    My Mom's a Werewolf
    An average housewife (Susan Blakely) is transformed into a werewolf after being seduced by a stranger (John Saxon). Only her daughter and friend can save her from remaining an animal forever. ~ John Bush, Rovi

  • Cast & Crew

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      Graham Ashley - Neston
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      Richard Bennett - Mike
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      Yvonne Buckingham - Mina
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      Annette Carell - Carl's Landlady
    • Image coming soon
      Brian Cobby - Young Man
    Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.