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Sci Fi Classics: 50 Movie Pack [12 Discs] (Boxed Set) (DVD) (Full Screen/Widescreen) (Eng)

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    Synopsis

    Includes:
  • The Lost Jungle (1934)
  • White Pongo (1945)
  • Queen of the Amazons (1947)
  • Prehistoric Women (1950)
  • Unknown World (1951)
  • Bride of the Gorilla (1951)
  • Robot Monster (1953)
  • Phantom from Space (1953)
  • Menace from Outer Space (1953)
  • Planet Outlaws (1953)
  • Mesa of Lost Women (1953)
  • The Snow Creature (1954)
  • Killers From Space (1954), MPAA Rating: NR
  • Crash of the Moons (1954)
  • Warning from Space (1956)
  • She-Gods of Shark Reef (1958)
  • Hercules Unchained (1959)
  • First Spaceship on Venus (1959), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Teenagers from Outer Space (1959)
  • Horrors of Spider Island (1959)
  • The Wild Women of Wongo (1959)
  • The Wasp Woman (1959), MPAA Rating: NR
  • Colossus and the Amazon Queen (1960)
  • The Amazing Transparent Man (1960)
  • The Incredible Petrified World (1960)
  • The Witch's Curse (1960)
  • Assignment Outer Space (1961)
  • Battle of the Worlds (1961)
  • Hercules and the Captive Women (1961)
  • The Phantom Planet (1961)
  • Eegah! (1962)
  • Hercules the Invincible (1963)
  • Hercules Against the Moon Men (1964)
  • Hercules and the Tyrants of Babylon (1964)
  • Santa Claus Conquers the Martians (1964)
  • The Atomic Brain (1964)
  • Voyage to the Prehistoric Planet (1965)
  • Gammera the Invincible (1965)
  • Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women (1966)
  • Zontar, the Thing from Venus (1966)
  • They Came from Beyond Space (1967), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Kong Island (1968)
  • Destroy All Planets (1968)
  • Attack of the Monsters (1969)
  • Mind Warp (1972), MPAA Rating: R
  • Invisible Strangler (1976), MPAA Rating: PG
  • War of the Planets (1977), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Blood Tide (1982), MPAA Rating: R
  • The Galaxy Invader (1985), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Laser Mission (1990), MPAA Rating: R

    The Lost Jungle
    The Lost Jungle is a feature-length version of the 12-episode Mascot serial of the same name. Legendary animal trainer Clyde Beatty plays himself, while Cecilia Parker portrays Beatty's screen sweetheart Ruth Robinson. When Ruth and her father are lost in the African jungle during a scientific expedition, Beatty goes to her rescue, flying to Africa via dirigible. The huge airship crashes in a hurricane, but Beatty survives and continues his desperate search. Upon finding Ruth, our hero gets mixed up with a group of bad guys in pursuit of hidden gold. Beatty manages to vanquish the villains and even battle a wild animal or two before the long-awaited happy ending. The Lost Jungle remained in reissue for years, thanks to the presence in the cast of 13-year-old Mickey Rooney. The film was also made available in a "hybrid" version consisting of a 73-minute feature and four 20-minute concluding chapters. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    White Pongo
    African explorers hit the Congo in search of a rare white gorilla in this campy jungle adventure filled with deliciously goofy special effects. The British biologists believe the white ape will prove to be the missing link. A British undercover cop accompanies the explorers because he believes the guide to be a killer. The cop's theory proves to be right and the guide soon causes the native bearers to revolt. He abandons the scientists to face the jungle alone. Before leaving, the guide kidnaps the expedition leader's lovely daughter. He then sets off to find some legendary gold. He ends up stumbling into the ancient home of the blonde ape. The primate doesn't like visitors and so strangles the killer and takes the hapless girl, her terrified bosom heaving seductively through her tattered blouse, to his lair. There the blonde ape must fight a regular gorilla. While the two muscle-bound hairballs fight it out, the undercover bobby and the scientists arrive. The white gorilla tosses his rival off a cliff and returns for some booty. Unfortunately, the explorers wound him and put him in a cage. They then return to England with their prize. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Queen of the Amazons
    In this adventure, a devoted fiancee journeys to the jungle to take on the terrifying Amazon women who have been holding her lover hostage. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Prehistoric Women
    Partially filmed at Whittier, CA, and at Hollywood's General Service Studio, this low-budget exploitation melodrama features Laurette Luez as Tigri, the head of a tribe of Amazonian women charged by an elder (Janette Scott) to find and capture husbands by the next full moon. Tigri finds and captures Engor (Allan Nixon), but a rival, Arva (Mara Lynn), also claims the handsome cave-dwelling tribesman. Tigri, however, manages to hold on to her man, but Engor gets the upper hand after accidentally discovering how to make fire by striking two stones together. The women are soon turned into slaves, but this little idyll is rudely disrupted by the arrival of Guaddi, an eight-foot giant who threatens to destroy them all. The giant is eventually slain by the men and Tigri, who has fallen in love, persuades Engor to return with her to the women's camp where the elder marries them. Sold on the independent exploitation circuit, Prehistoric Women reportedly made a mint for its producer, Albert J. Cohen. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi

    Unknown World
    Assembled by the same production team responsible for the minor sci-fi classic Rocketship X-M, Unknown World isn't quite in the same league as its predecessor. The plot is set in motion by Dr. Jeremiah Morley (Victor Kilian), who theorizes that mankind could save itself during a nuclear attack by resettling far beneath the earth's surface. To prove his theory, Morley builds the Cyclotram, a combination drill and exploratory vehicle, with the financial assistance of playboy Wright Thompson (Bruce Kellogg), who insists upon joining the expedition to the earth's core. After several hair-raising adventures, the Cyclotram and its surviving passengers reach a cavern nearly 2000 miles beneath the surface. The cavern contains all the necessities of survival save one: the atmosphere renders anyone living within its walls sterile. Deciding that it isn't worth hiding in the center of the earth if only one generation will survive, the explorers endeavor to get back to the surface -- but who will survive this journey? The obligatory female lead in Unknown World is played by Marilyn Nash, who'd been discovered by Charlie Chaplin for the 1947 film Monsieur Verdoux. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Bride of the Gorilla
    This silly, stagebound but entertaining little monster-mash from Universal horror writer/director Curt Siodmak stars burly Raymond Burr as a steward on a rubber plantation whose romantic tryst with the boss' wife (Barbara Payton) eventually leads to the employer's murder. When one of the voodoo-practicing servants of the ex-boss learns of this, he concocts a magic potion which transforms Burr (apparently) into a "sukaras" -- a kind of were-ape which roams the village by night, savaging the locals and sparking a plodding investigation by the local constable (Lon Chaney, Jr.). Enjoyable if only for its relentless goofiness, with an ending that will have most viewers wondering if Siodmak forgot to include a reel or two in his final edit. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    Robot Monster
    A young boy named Johnny (Gregory Moffett) is on a picnic with his widowed mother (Selena Royle) and sister (Claudia Barrett), when he meets a pair of archeologists (John Mylong, George Nader) exploring a nearby cave. Later, while napping, he has a dream -- that the Earth has been attacked by an alien named Ro-Man (played by George Barrows in a gorilla suit with a diving helmet), using the "calcinator death ray," and that he and his family (with Mylong and his mother now married) and scientist Nader are the only survivors. They try to elude capture by Ro-Man, who turns out to have some very human failings despite his mechanized mentality, including a desire to experience human emotions, which greatly complicates his efforts to destroy the family. ~ Bruce Eder, Rovi

    Phantom from Space
    Phantom from Space is a far better film than its lurid title and skintight budget would indicate. The scene is Santa Monica, where the community is plagued by what seems to be a serial killer. Thanks to a pre-credits sequence, the audience knows that the murderer is a visitor from outer space, who becomes invisible upon shedding his spacesuit. Government agent Hazen (Ted Cooper) teams with LAPD lieutenant Bowers (Harry Landers) to track down the extraterrestrial fugitive. It gradually develops that the space man is not a predator, merely a very frightened and defensive individual, but by the time this realization is made, it's too late for him. Efficiently directed by W. Lee Wilder (Billy's brother), Phantom from Space boasts some very impressive special effects for a film of its type, courtesy of special-effects technician Alex Welden and optical effects specialist Howard Anderson. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Menace from Outer Space
    When an alien rocket descends to Earth, an expedition into space to find the origins of the strange device results in a clash between two worlds in this science fiction film that was compiled from three episodes of the Rocky Jones, Space Ranger television series. Upon studying the alien rocket and determining that it must have come from the planet Fornax, Professor Newton sends a team led by space ranger Rocky Jones to investigate. Arriving on Fornax to discover an alien race that has been brainwashed by the nefarious Professor Kardos into thinking that the population of Earth is about to invade, Rocky attempts to persuade the alien leader that this is not the case. His efforts are complicated when his arch enemy Griff arrives and attempts to use the alien's advanced technology against the population of Earth. Now Rocky and the aliens must join forces to overcome Griff if they hold out any hope of diffusing tensions between Earth and Fornax and saving the planet that Rocky calls home. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

    Planet Outlaws
    This featurized abridgement of Universal's 12-episode serial Buck Rogers stars Buster Crabbe as Dick Calkins' famed comic-strip space explorer. Buck and his pal Buddy (Jackie Moran) are released from suspended animation after 500 years. They discover that the world is under the thumb of modernistic mobster Killer Kane (Anthony Warde), and are enlisted in the fight against Kane by Wilma Deering (Constance Moore) and Dr. Huer (C. Montague Shaw). Buck and Buddy are dispatched to Saturn to get help in their mission. After smoothing out the internal struggles of the Saturnians, Buck manages to overcome Killer Kane and his cosmic gangsters. Destination Saturn is a stop-and-go experience, not nearly as enjoyable as the complete Buck Rogers serial. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Mesa of Lost Women
    Mutated spiders, mad geniuses, childlike mental patients, gold-digging blondes, and vengeful little people are only part of the madness in this legendary bit of oddball science fiction. Grant (Robert Knapp) and Doreen (Mary Hill) wander into a shack in the wastelands of Mexico's Muerto Desert, where the sunburned and dehydrated pair tell their tale to a surveyor for an American petroleum firm. Grant was working as a pilot for millionaire businessman Jan Van Croft (Nico Lek), who was to marry the much younger Doreen when engine trouble stranded them in a Mexican border town. Jan and Doreen were killing time in a roadhouse when they were joined by the eccentric Dr. Leland Masterson (Harmon Stevens), who had recently escaped from a mental hospital. Before Masterson's nurse, George (George Barrows), can lure his patient back to the hospital, Masterson pulls a gun and shoots entertainer Tarantella (Tandra Quinn) while she performs a wild dance routine; Masterson then takes Jan and Doreen hostage and demands that Grant fly them away. Further engine trouble strands the traveling party on a mesa, where they discover a handful of strange, tiny men and statuesque women. In time, we discover that Masterson knows the story behind the Mesa's unusual residents -- they're the products of a series of experiments by Dr. Aranya (Jackie Coogan), whose research into the pituitary glands of spiders has produced unusual results. The only screen credit for screenwriter and co-director Herbert Tevos (who helmed the project with Southern exploitation icon Ron Ormond), Mesa of Lost Women also features a memorably irritating guitar-and-piano score and a brief appearance by Dolores Fuller, best known for her work with one-time beau Edward D. Wood Jr. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

    The Snow Creature
    One of several sci-fi/fantasy efforts produced and directed by W. Lee Wilder, the film's only drawback is the inconsistency of the Colorama color process. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Killers From Space
    The Killers from Space in this low-budget sci-fier are a group of aliens bent on conquering the earth. To this end, they overtake the mind and body of atomic scientist Peter Graves, using the poor man as a combination spy and saboteur. When Graves realizes this, he tries to warn mankind, but no one believes him. Marching defiantly back to the aliens' Bronson Canyon headquarters, where the slimy villains are busily syphoning off electrical power from a nearby generator, Graves vows to stop the extraterrestrials at any cost...including his own life (or what there's left of it). The makeup used for the aliens is laughable, but the film works so long as it concentrates on Graves' plight. Produced and directed by W. Lee Wilder, the brother of the more celebrated Billy Wilder, Killers from Space was distributed in the US by RKO Radio. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Crash of the Moons
    Crash of Moons consists of three half-hour episodes from the mid-1950s science fiction TV show Rocky Jones, Space Ranger. Richard Crane stars as Jones, spaceship commander for the United Worlds. Scotty Beckett costars as obligatory comedy relief Winky, while Maurice Cass is Professor Newton and shapely Sally Mansfield is navigator Veda. The 39 Rocky Jones episodes were constructed cliffhanger style, enabling the producers to reissue them as 13 ersatz "feature films". Per its title, Crash of Moons concerns two inhabited planets which seem inexorably headed for an apocalyptic collision. The film boasts some impressive special effects-impressive, that is, by 1950s TV standards. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Warning from Space
    Translated into English, the title of this Japanese sci-fi endeavor is Unknown Satellite over Tokyo. The extraterrestrials on this occasion are weirdly shaped creatures with one eye in the middle of their bodies. The aliens take the form of human beings so that they can warn mankind of an imminent disaster: the earth is on a collision course with another planet. Once the creatures have conveyed their messages, a scientist races against time to create a bomb that will throw the other planet off its course. Alas, foreign spies, apparently unmindful that the destruction of earth will affect them too, steal the super-weapon, and the chase is on. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    She-Gods of Shark Reef
    In this fantasy adventure, an escaped convict and his brother find themselves shipwrecked on a paradisiacal island filled with luscious native women who spend their days enacting bizarre rituals and diving for pearls. One of the women is selected by the others to be a sacrifice to the sharks, but the convict's brother has fallen in love and saves her. The lovers then flee to civilization. Meanwhile the brother's greedy brother tries to steal some of the women's pearls and ends up becoming shark bait. The story was filmed on location in Hawaii. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Hercules Unchained
    Steve Reeves' second (and last) film portrayal of Hercules is, in certain ways, better than his first. The plot this time is drawn from the legends surrounding the royal house of Thebes, which are most familiar to audiences through the Theban plays of Sophocles. The movie opens with Hercules, his new bride Iole (Sylva Koscina), and the young Ulysses (Gabriel Antonini) travelling to Thebes following the end of the quest for the Golden Fleece (depicted in the previous movie, Hercules). Their journey is interrupted when Hercules must do battle with the giant Anteus (Primo Carnera), whose strength seems to exceed his own until he realizes that Anteus is the son of the earth goddess and can't be defeated on land. On their arrival in Thebes, the trio discovers that the kingdom is in the midst of civil war -- Oedipus (Cesare Fantoni), the old king, is dying, and his two sons, Polynices and Eteocles, are contending for the throne and threatening to destroy each other and the populace. Hercules must leave Iole in the hands of one side in order to try and settle the dispute between the two would-be kings. While en route between the two armed camps, however, he is put under the spell of Omphale (Sylvia Lopez), the Queen of Lydia, who casts out his memory and takes him as a lover, with Ulysses in tow pretending to be his deaf-mute servant. Ulysses must figure out how to keep himself alive, restore Hercules' memory, get them both out of Omphale's grasp before she tires of Hercules and has him killed (as she has her previous lovers), and get them both back to Thebes before the kingdom is burned to the ground. His solution arrives in the form of his father, Laertes, and Hercules' companions from his voyage for the Golden Fleece. They all escape Omphale's clutches and arrive at Thebes as war has broken out between the two brothers and their armies. In a spectacular denouement, Hercules brings his chariot into the middle of the pitched battle, knocking down assault towers and sweeping cavalry before him to halt the battle. Peace is finally restored on a bittersweet note as the two brothers, Polynices and Eteocles, slay each other. ~ Bruce Eder, Rovi

    First Spaceship on Venus
    Originally released in East Germany as Der Schweigende Stern ("The Silent Star") and in Poland as Milczaca gwiazda, First Spaceship on Venus was partially intended as an anti-nuclear tract. In 1985, a strange, extraterrestrial spool is discovered, leading to a manned expedition to Venus. The multinational crew includes American Brinkman (Gunther Simon), African Talua (Juliusz Ongewe), and Japanese Sumiko Ogimura (Yoko Tani). After several special-effects setpieces (and reams of dogmatic dialogue later), the crew lands on Venus, only to discover that the planet's population was wiped out by a nuclear error. Armed with this knowledge, the expedition returns to earth with a warning for all mankind. The film was based on a novel by noted Eastern Bloc sci-fi novelist Stanislaw Lem. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Teenagers from Outer Space
    This off-the-wall, low-budget sci-fi film was written, produced, directed, edited, photographed, and acted (one role) by Tom Graeff. The unlikely story concerns a spaceship that lands on Earth from somewhere a lot less accommodating. On board are the space aliens' grazing animals, the gorgons. These are huge, crab-like monsters that quickly balloon up to a gigantic size and then proceed to devour any humans in sight. Soon the space aliens are split between the loner who would rather forget the gorgons and just stay here, and his two evil opponents. The single good guy appears to be the only hope for saving the people of the earth from turning into a snack food. ~ Eleanor Mannikka, Rovi

    Horrors of Spider Island
    This German-Yugoslav coproduction first surfaced in 1960 under the title Ein Toter Hing Im Netz. Egyptian leading man Alex D'Arcy plays a talent agent who escorts seven gorgeous chorus girls to a club date in Singapore. En route, their plane crash-lands in the ocean. D'Arcy and the girls make their way to a seemingly idyllic island, where they come across a huge spider's web-and the dessicated body of a scientist. The giant spider sinks its teeth in D'Arcy, turning the poor fellow into a werewolf! Then the fun begins, depending upon your idea of fun. Released in America to general distinterest in 1962, It's Hot in Paradise fared no better a few years later, when it was recut and retitled Horrors of Spider Island. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    The Wild Women of Wongo
    In this oddball cult favorite, Mother Nature decides to try out a fun little experiment on a remote tropical island. Two different primitive tribes inhabit opposite sides of the island -- the Wongo, remarkable for the fact their women are beautiful and their men are slack-jawed brutes, and the Goona, recognizable by their handsome men and unsightly women. Eventually, an attack by apemen causes the two tribes to meet for the first time. The Wongo women, wildly enthusiastic over the newly discovered beefcake, decide the Goona tribesmen are going to marry them whether they like the idea or not. The story also involves alligators, talking parrots, and a dragon god. The entire film was shot at an amusement park in Florida. The Wild Women of Wongo was the only completed project for screenwriter Cedric Rutherford; director James L. Wolcott, who also made his debut with this picture, went on to assemble The Best of Laurel and Hardy nine years later. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

    The Wasp Woman
    This goofy but entertaining horror cheapie from producer-director Roger Corman and company involves the efforts of a questionable scientist working for cosmetics magnate Susan Cabot, who is developing a new rejuvenating beauty cream derived from an enzyme secreted by wasps, intended to make women look eternally youthful. A vain woman obsessed with restoring her lost beauty, Cabot insists on being the first test subject. The solution proves remarkably effective at first, transforming her into a sultry raven-haired vixen...until she begins to take on the predatory traits of a giant female wasp, setting out on a nocturnal killing spree. Originally double-billed with The Beast from Haunted Cave, this cheesy monster mash inspired the less-amusing Leech Woman and was later remade for 1980s audiences (i.e., with a higher sex-and-gore quotient) as Evil Spawn. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    Colossus and the Amazon Queen
    Two gladiators are captured by an Amazon army, and are forced to fight against invading pirates. ~ John Bush, Rovi

    The Amazing Transparent Man
    This appallingly bad sci-fi film about an invisible bank-robber (Douglas Kennedy) was shot back-to-back with Beyond the Time Barrier on the grounds of the Texas State Fair in Dallas. The usual cackling and crime is included, most of which was done better in The Invisible Man. Marguerite Chapman is the film's one bright spot as Kennedy's lowlife girlfriend, but the rest of the characters are annoying and unsympathetic. Unpleasant, downbeat, and badly produced, it is hard to see the appeal of this one, even for genre completists. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi

    The Incredible Petrified World
    Often tagged "The Incredible Petrified Movie," this science-fiction mistake was created by one of the more unsung "heroes" of bad moviemaking, Jerry Warren, a Hollywood "auteur" comparable to the legendary Edward D. Woods, Jr.. This time, Jerry depicts a group of divers "stranded" in some underwater caverns when their diving bell malfunctions. While the intrepid little group of two men and an equal number of women (including erstwhile "Lois Lane," Phyllis Coates) scamper about beneath the surface, Professor Millard Wyman (John Carradine) works feverishly on solid ground to find a new diving apparatus that may reach them before an underwater source of oxygen runs out. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi

    The Witch's Curse
    Maciste, here played by Kirk Morris, is instead a legendary Italian superhero of long standing. In this one, the mighty Mr. M journeys to seventeenth-century Scotland (this is Hell?) His foe is a fearsome Scottish witch who holds awesome power over the local wildlife, and for a while it looks like our hero will get killed. As with many other Maciste films, this Technicolor opus was bundled into the "Sons of Hercules" package syndicated to local TV stations in the mid-1960s. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Assignment Outer Space
    A huge computer-run spaceship is on a collision course with the earth. Astronauts sent to save the earth lose focus on the mission when they decide to save a sexy temptress from celibacy. ~ Rovi

    Battle of the Worlds
    A sci-fi thriller about scientists trying to stop a collision of an alien planet with the earth. ~ Rovi

    Hercules and the Captive Women
    Hercules (Reg Park) and King Androcles (Ettore Manni) are on an ocean expedition when Androcles is washed overboard during a storm near a mysterious island. Making landfall, Hercules finds that the island is the kingdom of Atlantis, ruled by a beautiful, cruel, and ambitious queen, Antinea (Fay Spain), who controls a mysterious source of power. She has transformed her personal guard into super-strong warriors -- each nearly a match for Hercules, put Androcles under her spell, and inflicted terrible wounds on her people, all in preparation for her plan to conquer the world. Hercules finds that her power stems from a source older than the gods on Olympus, one over which he has virtually no power. He must save his friend, release Antinea's people, and prevent her from carrying out her plans. ~ Bruce Eder, Rovi

    The Phantom Planet
    In this off-beat sci-fi adventure an astronaut must make a forced landing upon a remote asteroid. His ship is damaged and he must breathe the planet's atmosphere. Soon he begins shrinking and once he gets down to six inches discovers the place populated by diminutive people who have turned the flying rock into a ship. He soon joins forces with the little people to defeat the monstrous solarites, terrifying creatures out to eat them. The leader of the wee-folk is Francis X. Bushman who was once a popular romantic lead in silent movies. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Eegah!
    Considered by many to be one of the worst films ever made, Eegah! is the story of a gigantic Neanderthal who has managed to survive into modern times living in California's Mojave desert, and who falls in love with and kidnaps the teenage girl who discovered him in a cave. A handsome young man (Arch Hall, Jr., the director's teenage son) proves to be her savior and while he and his rock & roll band play, the police shoot the caveman to bits. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Hercules the Invincible
    Dan Vadis is the main muscleman in this Italian sword-and-sandal opus, which predated Steve Reeves' Hercules by two years. Given the English-language dubbing of the actors, it's hard to tell whether or not the leading characters were really Hercules' offspring, or if they were rechristened to conform with TV's Sons of Hercules package of the early 1960s. Never mind. You'll forget all about who the characters are supposed to be as you watch Vadis and company take on dragons and giants on behalf of the Forces of Good. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Hercules Against the Moon Men
    In this fantasy, Hercules must fight the dreaded moon men who are sacrificing people in the hopes that their spilled blood will bring back their dead queen. He also battles a terrifying giant with a metal head, and several monsters. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Hercules and the Tyrants of Babylon
    This one was also released as Beast of Babylon Against the Son of Hercules. Closer to the truth is the original title: Goliath, King of the Slaves. Ex-Tarzan Gordon Scott plays Goliath, not Hercules (though the film was part of the Sons of Hercules TV package). Ancient Babylonian emperor Balthasar, who was the "good guy" in D.W. Griffith's Intolerance, is here described as the Tyrant of Babylon. He lives up to his title by sacrificing selected citizens of Assyria to the goddess Istar. Scott, the rightful heir to Babylonian throne, is consigned to a life of slavery, but by film's end he does a "Spartacus" and saves everybody. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Santa Claus Conquers the Martians
    Alien invaders kidnap everyone's favorite right jolly old elf in this low-budget mixture of children's comedy and sci-fi adventure. Christmas is not far away, and countless children are glued to their family's TV sets, watching reports about Santa Claus (John Call). However, this is happening on Mars, and leaders of the Red Planet aren't sure what to do for their kids who are pining away for a visit from the gift-bearing earthling. Martian leader Kimar (Leonard Hicks) dispatches two of his emissaries, the chronically grumpy Voldar (Vincent Beck) and the moronically cheerful Dropo (Bill McCutcheon), to Earth to bring Santa back for a visit. After arriving on Earth, Voldar and Dropo abduct two children, Betty (Donna Conforti) and Billy (Victor Stiles), and order the kids to show them the way to Santa's workshop, from which all three are taken to Mars against their will. As Santa, Betty, and Billy try to find a way back to Earth, Voldar becomes enraged with the Earth kids, while the children bond more comfortably with the intellectually-challenged Dropo. Shot on a shoestring budget on Long Island, Santa Claus Conquers the Martians has developed a rabid cult following over the years, and yes, it's true, Kimar's daughter Girmar really is played by a ten-year-old Pia Zadora. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

    The Atomic Brain
    This weird, morbid little sci-fi thriller stars Marjorie Eaton as a filthy-rich but decrepit old widow who has devoted much of her wealth to funding the dubious (to say the least) scientific research of Frank Gerstle, who has constructed a mad lab in the widow's basement in order to perfect a technique in which an infusion of atomic energy (or something) will enable him to transfer the widow's brain into a young and sexy physique. To this end, three subjects are solicited through a want ad (under the pretense of employing a housekeeper). The three young women, all of different nationalities (represented by horrendous accents), are subjected to the old woman's scrutiny, until she selects the prime candidate... as the others become fodder for the doctor's pet projects. Needless to say, things don't turn out quite as planned: people are burned, torn apart by man-beasts, and get their eyes ripped out -- one poor lass even winds up with the brain of a cat. This has a certain perverse charm and is competently directed (excepting some boring stretches) by Joseph V. Mascelli -- who, in spite of his work on this film and Ray Dennis Steckler's The Incredibly Strange Creatures Who Stopped Living and Became Mixed-up Zombies, would later publish a well-known book on cinematography. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    Voyage to the Prehistoric Planet
    Astronauts fly to Venus and find the planet filled with dangers gleaned from the epic Russian sci-fi film Planeta Bur (1963). Much of the film was shot on the set of executive producer Roger Corman's film Planet of Blood. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Gammera the Invincible
    One of the most fearsome of the Japanese monsters to hit the screen in the early 60's makes his debut in sci-fi thriller. As tensions between America and the Soviet Union rise to a fever pitch, U.S. troops shoot down a Russian bomber which is flying low in an Arctoc region. The bomber crashes, and its payload of hydrogen bombs explode upon impact. The blast releases and awakens Gamera, a gigantic fire-breathing turtle which had been frozen under the ice since prehistoric times. The newly revived monster makes his way to Tokyo, Japan, where he begins to lay waste to the city. As emminent scientist Dr. Hidaka (Eiji Funakoshi) searches for a way to defeat the monster, a young boy named Yoshiro (Yoshiro Unchida) develops an unlikely friendship with Gamera. For the film's American release, additional scenes were added featuring U.S. actors Brian Donlevy and Albert Dekker. The spelling of the monster's name was also changed; he's Gammera with two M's in this movie, but just Gamera in the sequels which followed. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

    Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women
    Earthling astronauts crash land on exotic Venus and find themselves assaulted by terrible monsters in this sci-fi adventure. Fortunately, the planet's other residents, beautiful women, come to their aid and help them to return home. Much of the film is comprised of scenes from two other films, Voyage to a Prehistoric Planet and a Russian film Planeta Bur. The film is the directorial debut of Peter Bogdanovich. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Zontar, the Thing from Venus
    This deliciously campy sci-film has developed a minor cult following. It chronicles the exploits of a Venusian bat-creature who tries to take over the Earth by invading the mind of a hapless victim and forcing the victim to attempt to shut off all the world's power sources. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    They Came from Beyond Space
    In this sci-fi drama, an alien spaceship breaks down and crashes on the moon. These creatures need help to make repairs and so use their powers to possess a few scientists and use them as slaves. Unfortunately for them, one scientist has a metal plate in his head and cannot be controlled. It is he who travels to the moon and has a little chat with the aliens and suggests they might get more help, if they simply asked for it. The story is based on Joseph Millard's book The Gods Hate Kansas. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

    Kong Island
    Bearing only a passing connection to King Kong -- and even that probably came to promoters as an afterthought -- this phenomenally silly Italo-Spanish sci-fi foolishness (originally titled Eva, La Venere Selvaggia) seems to have been conceived more as a vehicle for the frequently nude Esmerelda Barros. Barros plays Eva, a sultry jungle girl raised by apes, who is captured by a mad scientist (gangster-movie veteran Marc Lawrence) and his cohorts. The fascist-leaning loonies have been busily rounding up the island gorillas, planting electronic transmitters in their brains with the intent of creating an unstoppable remote-controlled army of robotic ape soldiers. To Eva's aid comes a lusty explorer (Brad Harris), whose intentions seem something less than noble. Eventually a disgruntled King Kong-like super-ape arrives to avenge his smaller kinfolk and stomp the daylights out of the evil homo sapiens. Silly but fun, in an Ed Wood sort of way. Also known simply as Kong Island and Eva the Wild Woman. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    Destroy All Planets
    Gamera the fire-belching turtle has replaced his human-hating ways with a friendly attitude towards children and once more saves the world in this film from director Noriyaki Yuasa. The villains are invading extraterrestrials whose spaceships can "morph" into giant squids. Gamera proceeds to wreck Tokyo with typical monster destructive behavior, returning to the sea after the spell is broken. Destroy All Planets has also been known under the titles Gamera tai Uchu Kaiju Bairasu and Gamera Vs. Outer-Space Monster Virus. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Attack of the Monsters
    When nasty children-eating aliens invade Earth, it is up to Gamera to save the day. ~ Iotis Erlewine, Rovi

    Mind Warp
    Exploitation veteran Joy N. Houck, Jr. directed this confusing Mississippi-lensed science-fiction thriller. Gil Peterson and Barbara Burgess star as doctors working at a secret, government-funded underground laboratory. Paid volunteers are broken down mentally in a sadistic series of experiments which include shock treatment and psychological torture. Cult favorite Stuart Lancaster appears as a scheming senator, and a young Gerald McRaney, Anne Latham, and James Best are among the victims. This film is primarily of interest to cult audiences, as mainstream viewers are likely to find that the minimal production values and makeshift editing undercut any impact which the story might have. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi

    Invisible Strangler
    Invisible Strangler tells the story of a boy who strangles his mother and while in a mental institution finds books which give him the key to making himself invisible. He then escapes from the hospital and goes on a murder spree, strangling his mother's friends in a series of unintentionally hilarious episodes, while they sit in their comfortable, expensive homes. The detective assigned to the case, Lt. Charles Barrett (Robert Foxworth) devises an unusual way to dispose of the killer. Sue Lyon, previously seen in Lolita, has a tiny role, as does Elke Somer. Originally shot in 1976 and titled The Astral Factor, this silly, obvious film sat on the shelf for 10 years before being released directly to video ~ Linda Rasmussen, Rovi

    War of the Planets
    While lost in space, a ship's crew battles its enemies. ~ John Bush, Rovi

    Blood Tide
    It will come as quite a shock to discover the venerable James Earl Jones and José Ferrer slumming in this Greek-lensed ultra-cheapie about a legendary sea creature aroused from centuries of sleep off the shores of a Greek island by an opportunistic American archaeologist (Jones). It seems the beastie's legacy is well known by some of the island's old-timers (namely Ferrer), including the part about appeasing the monster with a virgin sacrifice -- namely the alluring Deborah Shelton. The exotic locations and the presence of the gruff Jones (who apparently saw this as a paid vacation) lend a great deal of production value, but apparently Jones' salary came out of the filmmakers' special-effects budget -- because the feared creature of ancient legend looks like a sock puppet! This film is also known as Red Tide and Demon Lake. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

    The Galaxy Invader
    Galaxy Invader is a ripe blend of science fiction and the "poor white trash" school of cinema. An alien spaceship is forced to land in a dismal swamp somewhere in the rural South. The inbred yahoos inhabiting the community treat the space travellers with the same violent disdain that they'd afford any "furriner." But these knuckle-dragging rednecks have no concept of the terrible, awesome weaponry possessed by the extraterrestrials. Once they find out, all H-E-Double Hockey Sticks breaks loose. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Laser Mission
    In this action adventure tale, Professor Braun (Ernest Borgnine), an expert in weapons technology, is kidnapped by Soviet terrorists who intend to force him to make a high-tech laser cannon for them. Intelligence agents Michael Gold (Brandon Lee) and Alissa (Debi A. Monahan) are sent in by the CIA to rescue him and recover a cache of stolen diamonds before it's too late for Braun and the world at large. Laser Mission marked Brandon Lee's first starring role in a U.S. feature film, three years before his tragic death while shooting The Crow. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

  • Cast & Crew

    • Image coming soon
      Bruce Edwards
    • Image coming soon
      Cay Forester
    • J. Edward Bromberg
      J. Edward Bromberg
    • Image coming soon
      Jack George
    • Image coming soon
      John Miljan
    Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.