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Sci-Fi: Creature/Phantom From Space/The Disappearance of Flight 412/The Day the Sky Exploded [DVD]

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Overview

Special Features

  • Digitally mastered
  • Interactive menus
  • Scene index
  • Digitally enhanced audio 5.1

Synopsis

Creature
Less than a year before James Cameron's turbo-charged sequel, Hollywood (or its overseas counterparts) still managed to find ways to retread the badly-worn theme of Ridley Scott's Alien, as evidenced in this 1985 low-budget item. When a mysterious canister is uncovered on Saturn's largest moon Titan, a dormant, eons-old monster is released, making lunch of both the explorers who discovered it and the rival corporation's exploration team which investigates their disappearance. The most enjoyable "creature" in this otherwise pedestrian film is the ever-leering Klaus Kinski, who plays the lecherous sole survivor of the previous expedition, but the only real source of entertainment -- the depiction of gooey, gory effects and gratuitous nudity -- is spoiled by inadequate lighting and static camera set-ups. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

Phantom from Space
Phantom from Space is a far better film than its lurid title and skintight budget would indicate. The scene is Santa Monica, where the community is plagued by what seems to be a serial killer. Thanks to a pre-credits sequence, the audience knows that the murderer is a visitor from outer space, who becomes invisible upon shedding his spacesuit. Government agent Hazen (Ted Cooper) teams with LAPD lieutenant Bowers (Harry Landers) to track down the extraterrestrial fugitive. It gradually develops that the space man is not a predator, merely a very frightened and defensive individual, but by the time this realization is made, it's too late for him. Efficiently directed by W. Lee Wilder (Billy's brother), Phantom from Space boasts some very impressive special effects for a film of its type, courtesy of special-effects technician Alex Welden and optical effects specialist Howard Anderson. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

The Disappearance of Flight 412
US Air Force colonel Glenn Ford has a dilemma on his hands. He knows for a fact that two jets under his command were last seen chasing a UFO. But the military higher-ups have no intention of filling Ford in on further developments. Despite these stonewalling tactics, Ford steps up his own investigation--and uncovers an insidious right-wing plot to overthrow the government. Bradford Dillman, who has probably made more TV movies than Karen Valentine even, costars in The Disappearance of Flight 412. The film was telecast two months after Watergate, a time in which "conspiracy" movies were breeding like rabbits. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

The Day the Sky Exploded
A scientific experiment gone leaves the fate of the world hanging in the balance in this sci-fi thriller. The United States, the Soviet Union, and Great Britain join forces to launch a manned space mission, but things go terribly wrong and crew leader John MacLaren (Paul Hubschmid) is forced to abandon ship shortly after blast off. MacLaren safely returns to Earth, but the rocket continues to sail through space, eventually reaching the sun and causing it to break apart. The consequences are immediate and disastrous -- asteroids pummel the planet, Earthquakes and extreme weather conditions tear at the world's major cities, and the world's scientific community bands together in a last-ditch effort to stop the disaster before it's too late. Le Danger Vient de l'Escape (released in the United States as The Day The Sky Exploded features top-notch cinematography from European horror legend Mario Bava. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

Cast & Crew

  • Image coming soon
    Stan Ivar - Mike Davison
  • Wendy Schaal
    Wendy Schaal - Beth Sladen
  • Lyman Ward
    Lyman Ward - David Perkins
  • Image coming soon
    Robert Jaffe - Jon Fennel
  • Image coming soon
    Annette McCarthy - Dr. Wendy H. Oliver
Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.