PREVIEW BLACK FRIDAY DOORBUSTERS

See the ad ›

It looks like you're using an older version of Internet Explorer.
To best view our site — and for a better experience overall on the Web — please update your browser using the links below. It's free and it takes just a minute.
Download the latest version of Chrome, FireFox or Internet Explorer.
×

Star Trek: The Original Motion Picture Collection (Blu-ray Disc) (Eng)

Best Buy is dedicated to always offering the best value to our customers. We will match the price, at the time of purchase, on a Price Match Guarantee product if you find the same item at a lower price at a Designated Major Online Retailer or at a local retail competitor's store.

Here's how:
  • If you find a qualifying lower price online, call 1-888-BEST BUY and direct a customer service agent to the web site with the lower price, or when visiting a Best Buy store, one of our employees will assist you.
  • On qualifying products, Best Buy will then verify the current price to complete the price match.

Some exclusions apply. See the list of Designated Major Online Retailers and full details.

$42.99
On Sale
Regular Price: $56.99
You Save: $14.00
Free Shipping on Orders $35 and Up

Minimum purchase of $35 on eligible products required. Excludes select Best Buy Marketplace items, digital items, scheduled delivery items and items displaying "In Store Only" message.See full details

Item Added. View List

Add to List

    No lists found. Create one today.
    Add Item

    Rating Breakdown

    71%
    (34 Reviews)
    21%
    (10 Reviews)
    6%
    (3 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    2%
    (1 Review)
    Plot:
    4.5
    Cinematography:
    4.6
    Acting:
    4.3
    DVD Extras:
    4.5

    Product Availability

    Special Offer

    Cardholder Offer

    Ratings & Reviews

    Overall Customer Rating:
    98% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (47 out of 48)

    Rating Breakdown

    71%
    (34 Reviews)
    21%
    (10 Reviews)
    6%
    (3 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    2%
    (1 Review)
    Plot:
    4.5
    Cinematography:
    4.6
    Acting:
    4.3
    DVD Extras:
    4.5

    For Parents

    Age
    10
    Common Sense Media Says:
    Stirring but sad science-fiction enterprise.

    Special Features

    • Star Trek: The Captains' Summit
    • Library computer
    • Star Trek I.Q. (BD-Live)

    Synopsis

    Includes:
  • Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979), MPAA Rating: G
  • Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991), MPAA Rating: PG

    Star Trek: The Motion Picture
    When plans to launch a second Star Trek television series in the late 1970s were scrapped by Paramount Pictures, the show's creator, Gene Roddenberry, instead transformed the aborted program's 2-hour pilot into this big budget theatrical feature. Five years after the legendary voyages of the starship Enterprise, James T. Kirk (William Shatner) is an unhappy, desk-bound admiral at Starfleet headquarters. Kirk goes aboard his old vessel to observe its re-launch under new captain Will Decker (Stephen Collins). Soon, however, an escalating crisis causes Kirk to take command of his old ship. A mysterious, planet-sized energy force of enormous power is headed for Earth. Reunited with Spock (Leonard Nimoy), Dr. Leonard "Bones" McCoy (DeForest Kelley), and the rest of his former colleagues, Kirk takes the Enterprise inside the massive energy cloud and discovers that it is the long-lost NASA space probe Voyager. Now a sentient being after accumulating centuries of knowledge in its deep space travels, the alien, which calls itself V'ger, has come home seeking its creator. Although not a critical home run, box office receipts for Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979) were strong enough to inspire a revamped television series and a long-running line of theatrical sequels. ~ Karl Williams, Rovi

    Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
    Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan is fondly regarded as being the closest in spirit to the 1966-69 TV series that spawned it. Admiral Kirk (William Shatner) escapes the tedium of a desk job to join Mr. Spock (Leonard Nimoy) and Dr. Leonard "Bones" McCoy (DeForest Kelley) on another space mission. While boldly going where no man etc. etc., Kirk crosses the path of his old enemy Khan (Ricardo Montalban), who as any die-hard Trekker can tell you, was the chief antagonist in the 1966 Trek TV episode "Space Seed." Leading a crew of near-savage space prisoners, Khan insinuates himself into the Genesis Project, which is designed to introduce living organisms on long-dead planets. Intending to harness this program for his own despotic purposes, Khan engages in battle with the Enterprise crew. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Star Trek III: The Search for Spock
    When last we left the crew of the star ship Enterprise, they were heading home following a skirmish with the despotic Khan. The unpleasant incident had cost the life of Mr. Spock (Leonard Nimoy)--or so it seemed. Admiral Kirk (William Shatner) is informed by Spock's father Sarek (Mark Lenard) that his son is being kept alive in the thoughts of one of the crew members. It now becomes necessary to search for Spock's body, so that flesh and soul can be rejoined on Vulcan. It turns out that Spock's spirit is residing within the mind of the Vulcan's longtime shipmate, "Bones" McCoy (DeForrest Kelley). Finding the body is another matter, since the Enterprise has been consigned to the trash heap and thus is out of Kirk's jurisdiction. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
    Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1986) concludes the story arc begun with Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982) and continued in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984), but on a wholly new, different, and upbeat note. As the movie opens, months have elapsed since the events in Star Trek III; Admiral Kirk (William Shatner), McCoy (DeForest Kelley), Scott (James Doohan), Sulu (George Takei), Uhura (Nichelle Nichols), and Chekhov (Walter Koenig) are marooned in self-imposed exile on Vulcan, along with the resurrected and regenerated Spock (Leonard Nimoy, who also directed). While Spock tries to sort out the Vulcan and human halves of his resurrected psyche, the others prepare to return to Earth to face a brace of charges by the Klingon Empire and Star Fleet over events on Genesis. Taking off in their commandeered, jerry-rigged Klingon ship, they head to Earth, not knowing that a new crisis could destroy their home world -- a huge, immensely powerful alien probe has entered the galaxy and established a position near Earth, disabling every vehicle and installation in its path with its energy and communication output, and has ionized the entire atmosphere and started vaporizing the oceans, leaving the planet only hours to survive. Spock determines that the probe is sending out signals to another intelligent terrestrial life form, humpbacked whales, which no longer exist. Using the gravity slingshot time-warp effect (established early in the original series) to travel back into Earth's 20th century, Kirk and company land in 1980s San Francisco to try and bring humpbacked whales to the 23rd century, to respond to the probe. Thus starts a surprisingly breezy, light-hearted, yet serious odyssey through the past (comparable to the best work of the original series), as the crew learns to deal with exact-change buses, angry drivers, punk-rock enthusiasts and other elements of '80s life, and Kirk tries to persuade a scientist (Catherine Hicks) of his good intentions for two whales in captivity. The screenplay, co-authored by Steve Meerson, Peter Krikes, Nicholas Meyer, and Harve Bennett (from a story by Nimoy and Bennett), is the cleverest and most sophisticated of all the Star Trek movie screenplays, recalling some of the elements of Meyer's earlier time-travel movie Time After Time and also anticipating the feel and tone of the series Star Trek: The Next Generation (which would be on the air not quite a year later). Nimoy's direction offers a combination of brisk pacing and a deep love of the characters and the actors, as well as a serious appreciation of the humorous aspects of the script, and Shatner gives his best performance of any of the movies. ~ Bruce Eder, Rovi

    Star Trek V: The Final Frontier
    Kirk (William Shatner), McCoy (DeForest Kelley), and Spock (Leonard Nimoy) are enjoying a vacation in Yosemite National Park when duty calls. Vulcan cult leader Sybok (Laurence Luckinbill) and his followers have invaded a "planet of peace," where delegates from hostile races coexist in a sort of intergalactic United Nations. Ordered to quell the crisis, the Enterprise crew discovers that it's a ruse perpetrated by Sybok, who takes over the ship, piloting it toward the "Great Barrier," an energy field at the galaxy's rim. Sybok, who is revealed to be Spock's half-brother, possesses the ability to help people face their "inner pain." He also believes that God lies beyond the Great Barrier. Once arriving there, however, Sybok and the Enterprise crew discover only an imprisoned alien entity. Shatner wrote the story and made his directorial debut with the film, failing to ape the success that his colleague Nimoy enjoyed with his pair of Trek directing forays. ~ Karl Williams, Rovi

    Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country
    The plot involves a peace conference between the Federation of Planets and the troublesome Klingons. The Klingons are hoping to perform a little damage control after triggering a mining disaster on one of their moons; their spokesman is the seemingly contrite General Chang (Christopher Plummer). All negotiations abruptly cease when a Klingon vessel is attacked, and Capt. Kirk (William Shatner) and Dr. McCoy (DeForest Kelley) are accused of the crime. As they stand trial for murder, Mr. Spock (Leonard Nimoy) and Vulcanian trainee Lt. Valeris (Kim Cattrall) try to locate the real culprits. It turns out that Kirk and McCoy are victims of a conspiracy to foment further hostilities between the Good Guys and the Klingons. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

  • Cast & Crew

    • William Shatner
      William Shatner - James T. Kirk
    • Leonard Nimoy
      Leonard Nimoy - Mr. Spock
    • DeForest Kelley
      DeForest Kelley - Leonard "Bones" McCoy
    • George Takei
      George Takei - Hikaru Sulu
    • James Doohan
      James Doohan - Montgomery "Scotty" Scott
    Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.