Tech Toys for AllSave on tech gifts for everyone on your list.Shop now ›

The Best of Bogart Collection [4 Discs] [Blu-ray]

  • SKU: 4736206
  • Release Date: 03/25/2014
  • Rating: PG
  • 4.8 (33)
Cardholder Offers

Overview

Ratings & Reviews

Overall Customer Rating:
4.8
100% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (33 out of 33)

Special Features

  • The Maltese Falcon: Commentary by Bogart biographer Eric Lax
  • Featurette The Maltese Falcon: One Magnificent Bird
  • Breakdowns of 1941: Studio blooper reel
  • Makeup tests
  • Becoming attractions: The trailers of Humphrey Bogart Warner Night at the movies
  • 1941 short subjects gallery
  • Audio-only bonus:
  • 3 radio show adaptations
  • Casablanca: Commentary by Roger Ebert
  • Commentary by historian Rudy Behlmer
  • Introduction by Lauren Bacall
  • Additional scenes & outtakes
  • Scoring session outtakes
  • Bacall on Bogart
  • You must remember this: a tribute to Casablanca
  • Featurette As Time Goes By: The Children Remember
  • Production research gallery
  • Homage cartoon Carrotblanca
  • Who holds tomorrow?: Premiere episode from 1955 Warner Bros. Presents TV series adaptation of Casablanca
  • Audio-only bonus: Radio production with the movie's 3 key stars
  • Theatrical trailers
  • The Treasure of the Sierra Madre:
  • Commentary by Bogart biographer Eric Lax
  • Discovering treasure: The story of The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
  • Documentary profile John Huston
  • Warner Night at the Movies 1948 short subjects gallery: Leonard Matlin introduction, newsreel, 2 classic cartoons, comedy short, theatrical trailers
  • Audio-only bonus: Radio show with the movie's original stars
  • The African Queen:
  • Embracing chaos: Making the African Queen

Synopsis

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
John Huston's 1948 treasure-hunt classic begins as drifter Fred C. Dobbs (Humphrey Bogart), down and out in Tampico, Mexico, impulsively spends his last bit of dough on a lottery ticket. Later on, Dobbs and fellow indigent Curtin (Tim Holt) seek shelter in a cheap flophouse and meet Howard (Walter Huston), a toothless, garrulous old coot who regales them with stories about prospecting for gold. Forcibly collecting their pay from their shifty boss, Dobbs and Curtin combine this money with Dobbs's unexpected windfall from a lottery ticket and, together with Howard, buy the tools for a prospecting expedition. Dobbs has pledged that anything they dig up will be split three ways, but Howard, who's heard that song before, doesn't quite swallow this. As the gold is mined and measured, Dobbs grows increasingly paranoid and distrustful, and the men gradually turn against each other on the way toward a bitterly ironic conclusion. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre is a superior morality play and one of the best movie treatments of the corrosiveness of greed. Huston keeps a typically light and entertaining touch despite the strong theme, for which he won Oscars for both Director and Screenplay, as well as a supporting award for his father Walter, making Walter, John, and Anjelica Huston the only three generations of one family all to win Oscars. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Casablanca
One of the most beloved American films, this captivating wartime adventure of romance and intrigue from director Michael Curtiz defies standard categorization. Simply put, it is the story of Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart), a world-weary ex-freedom fighter who runs a nightclub in Casablanca during the early part of WWII. Despite pressure from the local authorities, notably the crafty Capt. Renault (Claude Rains), Rick's café has become a haven for refugees looking to purchase illicit letters of transit which will allow them to escape to America. One day, to Rick's great surprise, he is approached by the famed rebel Victor Laszlo (Paul Henreid) and his wife, Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman), Rick's true love who deserted him when the Nazis invaded Paris. She still wants Victor to escape to America, but now that she's renewed her love for Rick, she wants to stay behind in Casablanca. "You must do the thinking for both of us," she says to Rick. He does, and his plan brings the story to its satisfyingly logical, if not entirely happy, conclusion. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi

The African Queen
After years of wooing director John Huston via good reviews, film critic James Agee was given a chance to write the screenplay for a Huston picture. Adapted from a novel by C.S. Forester, The African Queen stars Humphrey Bogart in his Oscar-winning portrayal of Charlie Allnut, the slovenly, gin-swilling captain of a tramp steamer called the African Queen, which ships supplies to small East African villages during World War I. Katharine Hepburn plays Rose Sayer, the maiden-lady sister of a prim British missionary, Rev. Samuel Sayer (Robert Morley). When Germans invade and Samuel dies, Allnut offers to take Rose back to civilization. She can't tolerate his drinking or bad manners; he isn't crazy about her imperious, judgmental attitude. However it does not take long before their passionate dislike turns to love. Together the disparate duo work to ensure their survival on the treacherous waters and devise an ingenious way to destroy a German gunboat. The African Queen may well be the perfect adventure film, its roller-coaster storyline complemented by the chemistry between its stars. The profound difficulties inherent in filming on location in Africa have been superbly documented by several books, including one written by Katharine Hepburn. Screenwriter Peter Viertel (who worked, on an uncredited basis, on the script of this film - assisting with some of the dialogue) incorporated some of the African Queen anecdotes in his roman a clef about a Huston-like director/adventurer, White Hunter, Black Heart. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

The Maltese Falcon
After two previous film versions of Dashiell Hammett's detective classic The Maltese Falcon, Warner Bros. finally got it right in 1941--or, rather, John Huston, a long-established screenwriter making his directorial debut, got it right, simply by adhering as closely as possible to the original. Taking over from a recalcitrant George Raft, Humphrey Bogart achieved true stardom as Sam Spade, a hard-boiled San Francisco private eye who can be as unscrupulous as the next guy but also adheres to his own personal code of honor. Into the offices of the Spade & Archer detective agency sweeps a Miss Wonderly (Mary Astor), who offers a large retainer to Sam and his partner Miles Archer (Jerome Cowan) if they'll protect her from someone named Floyd Thursby. The detectives believe neither Miss Wonderly nor her story, but they believe her money. Since Archer saw her first, he takes the case -- and later that evening he is shot to death, as is the mysterious Thursby. Miss Wonderly's real name turns out to be Brigid O'Shaughnessey, and, as the story continues, Sam is also introduced to the effeminate Joel Cairo (Peter Lorre) and the fat, erudite Kasper Gutman (Sydney Greenstreet, in his film debut). It turns out that Brigid, Cairo and Gutman are all international scoundrels, all involved in the search for a foot-high, jewel-encrusted statuette in the shape of a falcon. Though both Cairo and Gutman offer Spade small fortunes to find the "black bird," they are obviously willing to commit mayhem and murder towards that goal: Gutman, for example, drugs Spade and allows his "gunsel" Wilmer (Elisha Cook Jr.) to kick and beat the unconscious detective. This classic film noir detective yarn gets better with each viewing, which is more than can be said for the first two Maltese Falcons and the ill-advised 1975 "sequel" The Black Bird. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Cast & Crew

  • Humphrey Bogart
    Humphrey Bogart - Fred C. Dobbs
  • Walter Huston
    Walter Huston - Howard
  • Tim Holt
    Tim Holt - Curtin
  • Barton MacLane
    Barton MacLane - McCormick
  • Alfonso Bedoya
    Alfonso Bedoya - Gold Hat

Overall Customer Rating

4.8 (33 Reviews)
Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.