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The Dolemite Collection [7 Discs] [DVD]

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$34.99
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Overview

Special Features

  • Original 1970s radio spots
  • Restored theatrical trailers
  • Trivia game
  • Location tour with Rudy Ray Moore
  • Dolby Surround encoded
  • Animated menus

Synopsis

Dolemite
Stand-up comedy legend Rudy Ray Moore's foul-mouthed rap routines took many of the elements of blaxploitation films -- pimps, gangsters, and sex -- to their hilarious limits. It was only natural that he should take his stage persona to the big screen as Dolemite, the "baddest" cool cat in town. Dolemite is a wrongly accused clubowner who is set up by arch-rival Willie Green (D'Urville Martin, who directed) and sent to jail. A madam named Queen Bee (Lady Reed) gets him released on the condition that he helps the cops find Green, and Dolemite is picked up from prison by a slew of multi-ethnic beauties who bring his "pimp-threads" so he can operate. There are many colorful street scenes and funny characters, including "The Hamburger Pimp" and the usual corrupt officials. Dolemite has sex, raps some funny comedy routines (including the underground classic "Signifyin' Monkey") and uses an all-girl kung-fu army to bring down the bad guys. A fast-paced, delirious crime-comedy, Dolemite is supremely entertaining despite its less than stellar production values. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi

The Legend of Dolemite!
Though not well-known outside of a small circle of rabid fans, black satirist/comedian and the star of several blaxploitation films Rudy Ray Moore (AKA "Dolemite") had a profound influence on the comedy of Richard Pryor and Eddie Murphy. This film profiles his life and career. Highlights include interviews with Moore, performance footage, and interviews with some of his more famous fans, including rappers Ice-T and Eazy-E, as well as clips from Moore's early films. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

The Human Tornado
In this violent comedy, the sequel to Dolemite, the rotund rapster must hit the road for California after an Anglo sheriff finds him fooling around with his wife. Once there he gets involved with a sexy, hard-living madame and her flock of kung fu fighting females who are fighting a ruthless local gangster. The fugitive gets a few licks in too, unfortunately, just as he is about to celebrate his victory he is shot by the angry sheriff. Fortunately, the Human Tornado is not easily killed as he was wearing a bullet proof vest. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

Rude
While Rudy Ray Moore is best remembered today for his outrageous blaxploitation movies, such as Dolemite and The Human Tornado, he started out as a standup comedian who broke barriers for off-color comedy on such "party" albums as Eat Out More Often. Rude is a performance film which captures Moore on-stage at a comedy club, delivering the rhyming rap routines and epic tales of sexual conquest that first made him famous. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

Petey Wheatstraw
In this slapstick blaxploitation feature, Petey Wheatstraw (Rudy Ray Moore, aka "Mr. Dolomite") is a candidate to become the devil's son-in-law. The storyline is a scaffolding on which Rudy Ray Moore's standup humor can be unfolded. Beginning life as the afterbirth to a watermelon, the young Wheatstraw becomes a martial artist, but is unable to best the evil comedy team of Leroy and Skillet, who also indulge in wholesale murder. Satan restores the comedians' victims to life, and charges Petey with the task of marrying his clock-stoppingly ugly daughter to giving him a grandchild. When Petey attempts to default on the deal, he is pursued by the devil's henchmen. ~ Clarke Fountain, Rovi

Disco Godfather
J. Robert Wagoner directs the 1979 blaxploitation-martial arts classic Disco Godfather. Rudy Ray Moore stars as Tucker Williams, an ex-cop and resident DJ at the nightclub Blueberry Hill Disco. When his nephew Bucky (Julius J. Carry III) gets mixed up with drugs, Tucker is motivated to start some violence. With the help of plucky Noel (Carol Speed), Tucker takes on major angel dust dealer Singer Ray (James H. Hawthorne). Also memorable are the Disco dance production numbers in amazing sparkly costumes, the hallucinogenic PCP segments, and the repeatable catch phrases. ~ Andrea LeVasseur, Rovi

Rudy Ray Moore: Live at Wetlands
Before he was one of the pioneering underground "party" comics of the '60s and '70s and starred in such infamous blaxploitation epics as Dolemite and Disco Godfather, Rudy Ray Moore had a career as a R&B singer. In the fall of 2000, Moore returned to the bandstand for a nightclub tour in which he belted out vintage tunes such as "Hully Gully Fever" and "Do You Call That a Buddy" alongside new numbers like "Hip Shakin' Papa" and "Put Me in the Mix." Rudy Ray Moore: Live at Wetlands records the New York City date of Moore's musical comeback, with longtime cohort Jimmy Lynch (aka "Mr. Motion" and "The Funky Tramp") leading the band as Moore sings a dozen songs, interspersed with his trademark X-rated comedy. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

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