The Great American Western, Vol. 29 [DVD]

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Overview

Special Features

  • Interactive menus
  • Scene index
  • Digitally mastered
  • Digitally enhanced audio 5.1

Synopsis

Fuzzy Settles Down
In this western, Billy the Kid must convince Fuzzy not to leave the trail. Fuzzy tries anyway and buys a small-town newspaper. It doesn't take him long to find himself accused of embezzling money from his new business. Unfortunately for Fuzzy, he is innocent. It is his pal the Kid that rides to his rescue, and kills the real embezzler. Fuzzy decides that newspaperin' ain't for him and so leaves the city and attempts to find a quiet place in the country. ~ Sandra Brennan, Rovi

Home in Oklahoma
One of the better Roy Rogers vehicles of its period, Home in Oklahoma casts Rogers as a crusading frontier newspaper editor. Forsworn to find the murderers of a prominent cattle rancher, Roy teams up with big-city journalist Connie Edwards (Dale Evans) and grizzled ranch foreman Gabby Whittaker (Gabby Hayes). Following the trail of clues like a Sagebrush Sherlock, Rogers exposes a rival rancher (never mind which one-his identity is obvious to seasoned mystery fans) as the culprit. Musical highlights include Roy and Dale's rendition of the novelty tune "Miguelito." Chalk up another winner for the star-director team of Roy Rogers and William Witney. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Stagecoach Outlaws
At long last, a low-budget Western that fully lives up to its title, Stagecoach Outlaws depicts exactly that, a gang of outlaws robbing a stage line operated by Jed Bowen (Edward Cassidy). When Billy Carson (Buster Crabbe) foils the gang's latest holdup, its leader, Steve Kirby (I. Stanford Jolley), arranges to have the notorious outlaw Matt Brawley (Robert Kortman) sprung from jail. Unfortunately for Kirby, his henchmen instead release Fuzzy Q. Jones (Al St. John), whose stupidity had landed him behind bars. Before he has time to explain, Fuzzy is assigned to kill Billy and then the real Matt Brawley turns up. After a series of bruising fistfights in a ghost town hotel, the gang is finally rounded up and carted off to jail. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi

Arizona Days
In his third starring Western, former radio singer Tex Ritter played a minstrel performer turned tax collector! During a performance at the Tombstone, Arizona, opera house, Tex Malinson (Ritter) courageously goes up against Harry Price (Forrest Taylor) and his henchmen, who refuse to pay the price of admission. The local sheriff (Budd Buster) is so impressed that he suggests Malinson for the job of tax collector. Price, needless to say, is a major tax offender but Tex and sidekick "Grass" Hopper (Syd Saylor) manage to "convince" him to do his civic duty. In between collecting taxes from town bullies, Ritter performed his own Tombstone, Arizona and High, Wide and Handsome, as well as If Love Were Mine by Frank Sanucci. Salty Holmes, known as "The Harmonica Maestro," performed his specialty of playing two harmonicas at the same time: one with his mouth, the other with his nose, and former Broadway luminary Ethelind Terry played one of Ritter's fellow minstrels. The erstwhile operetta diva's first film since the disastrous Lord Byron of Broadway (1930), it was also to be her last. Producer Edward F. Finney headed a trek to Wilcox, Arizona, for a few scenes, but most of Arizona Days was made at the Brandeis and Garner Ranches in Chatsworth, California. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi

Cast & Crew

  • Larry "Buster" Crabbe
    Larry "Buster" Crabbe - Billy Carson
  • Image coming soon
    John Elliott
  • Image coming soon
    Robert E. Hill
  • Charles King
    Charles King
  • Image coming soon
    Ted Mapes

Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.