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Tim Burton Collection [7 Discs / Blu-ray] (Boxed Set) (Gift Set) (Blu-ray Disc)

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    Rating Breakdown

    83%
    (5 Reviews)
    17%
    (1 Review)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    Plot:
    4.4
    Cinematography:
    5
    Acting:
    4.2
    DVD Extras:
    4.2

    Product Availability

    Special Offer

    Cardholder Offer

    Ratings & Reviews

    Overall Customer Rating:
    100% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (6 out of 6)

    Rating Breakdown

    83%
    (5 Reviews)
    17%
    (1 Review)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    Plot:
    4.4
    Cinematography:
    5
    Acting:
    4.2
    DVD Extras:
    4.2

    For Parents

    Age
    9
    Common Sense Media Says:
    Early Tim Burton is creepy, dark fun for tweens and teens.

    Special Features

    • Additional Scenes
    • Batman - Commentary by Tim Burton
    • Batman Returns: Commentary by Tim Burton
    • Bats, mattes and Dark Knights: the visual effects of Batman
    • Beetlejuice: Music-only track
    • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory: In-movie experience
    • Danny Elfman interprets the two worlds
    • Featurette on the set with Bob Kane
    • Featurette the bat, the cat and the penguin
    • Legends of the Dark KNight: the history of Batman - the comic book saga as reinvented and reinterpreted over seven decades
    • Making puppets tick
    • Mouth-watering Commentary by Tim Burton
    • Music-only track with commentary by Danny Elfman
    • Pee-Wee's Big Adventure: Commentary by Paul Reubens and director Tim Burton
    • Production sketches and storyboards
    • Shadow of the bat: the cinematic saga of the Dark Knight parts 1-3
    • Shadows of the bat: the cinematic saga of the Dark Knight part 4: Dark Side of the Knight
    • The animators: the breath of life
    • The voices behind the boice
    • Theatrical trailer
    • Tim Burton's Corpse Bride: Inside the two worlds
    • Tim Burton: dark vs. light
    • Voices from the underworld

    Synopsis

    Includes:
  • Pee-Wee's Big Adventure (1985), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Beetlejuice (1988), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Batman (1989), MPAA Rating: PG-13
  • Batman Returns (1992), MPAA Rating: PG-13
  • Mars Attacks! (1996), MPAA Rating: PG-13
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005), MPAA Rating: PG

    Pee-Wee's Big Adventure
    Co-written by Paul Reubens and Phil Hartman, Pee Wee's Big Adventure marks the debut of director Tim Burton, who stamps the entire film with his quirky trademark style. The premise: Pee Wee (Reubens), an overgrown pre-pubescent boy sporting a molded Princeton cut, blush, lipstick, and a shrunken gray flannel suit, lives an idyllic life in his bizarre home (some have compared the remarkable set design to the expressionistic The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari) until someone nabs his most prized possession: a fire engine-red customized bicycle. He then embarks on an epic cross-country search to find his lost love, not to mention more than a little adventure. Along the way, he makes friends with various oddball characters, visits the Alamo, endures various hallucinatory nightmares, and has a supernatural run-in with a spectral trucker. In this reprisal of his popular standup routine, Reubens is wonderful as the nerdy man child; he plays it silly, yet he manages to imbue the role with some sensitivity without ever seeming maudlin. The score by Danny Elfman is terrific -- as is the case in nearly every film Burton has directed -- and the script is fresh and inventive. Some of the most memorable moments: the opening sequence involving Pee Wee's morning activities is a stroke of genius (note the bunny slippers and talking breakfast), as are the scenes at the truck stop, and the "Hollywood" version of Pee Wee's story at the end (starring James Brolin and Morgan Fairchild in surprise cameos). In all, Pee Wee's Big Adventure is a delightful film, enjoyable for children as well as adults. ~ Jeremy Beday, Rovi

    Beetlejuice
    Thanks to the carelessness of a cute little dog, newlyweds Geena Davis and Alec Baldwin are killed in a freak auto accident. Upon arriving in the outer offices of Heaven, the couple finds that, thanks to a century's worth of bureaucratic red tape, they're on a long celestial waiting list. Before they can earn their wings, Davis and Baldwin must occupy their old house as ghosts for the next fifty years. Alas, the house is now owned by insufferable yuppies Catherine O'Hara and Jeffrey Jones. Horrified at the prospect of sharing space with these obnoxious interlopers, Davis and Baldwin do their best to scare O'Hara and Jones away, but their house-haunting skills are pathetic at best. In desperation, the ghostly couple engage the services of a veteran scaremeister: a yellow-haired, snaggle-toothed, profane, flatulent "gonzo" spirit named Beetlejuice (Michael Keaton). The problem: Beetlejuice cannot be trusted-especially when he falls in love with O'Hara and Jones' gloomy, black-clad teenaged daughter Winona Ryder. Beetlejuice producer David Geffen, director Tim Burton, and composer Danny Elfman were also involved in an animated TV-series spin-off. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Batman
    Behind the black cowl, Gotham City superhero Batman is really millionaire philanthropist Bruce Wayne (Michael Keaton), who turned to crimefighting after his parents were brutally murdered before his eyes. The only person to share Wayne's secret is faithful butler Alfred (Michael Gough). The principal villain in Batman is The Joker (Jack Nicholson) who'd been mob torpedo Jack Napier before he was horribly disfigured in a vat of acid. The Joker's plan to destroy Batman and gain control of Gotham City is manifold. First he distributes a line of booby-trapped cosmetics, then he goes on a destruction spree in the Gotham Art Museum while the music of Prince blasts away in the background, and finally he orchestrates an all-out campaign to win the hearts and minds of the Gothamites, hoping to turn them against the Cowled One. Meanwhile, reporter Vicki Vale (Kim Basinger) becomes the love of Batman's life-which of course plays right into the Joker's hands. Photographed by Roger Pratt, designed by Anton Furst, and scored by Tim Burton's favorite composer Danny Elfman, Batman was a monstrous box-office hit, making $100 million in the first ten days of release--$82,800,000 in North America alone. Incidentally, Billy Dee Williams' comparatively small role as DA Harvey Dent was originally designed to set up the sequel, wherein Dent was to convert into master criminal Two-Face; but by the time the producers got around to that character in 1995's Batman Forever, Two-Face was played by Tommy Lee Jones. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Batman Returns
    In this first sequel to 1989's Batman, the Caped Crusader (Michael Keaton) is up against the Penguin (Danny DeVito), the hideously deformed scion of a wealthy Gotham City family. The Penguin plots with evil businessman Max Schreck (Christopher Walken) to become mayor and then turn Gotham into a cathedral of crime. Upon overhearing these plans, Schreck's mousy secretary Selena Kyle (Michelle Pfeiffer) is tossed from a high-rise window by her boss. Rescued by a covey of kittens, Selena transforms into the leather-clad Catwoman. In this guise, she teams with the Penguin and Schreck to divvy up their ill-gotten gains and help discredit Batman-but she also has her own scores to settle. Paul "Pee-Wee Herman" Reubens, Vincent Schiavelli and Jan Hooks play significant bits, while Pat Hingle and Michael Gough make returns as, respectively, Commissioner Gordon and Alfred the Butler. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Mars Attacks!
    This quirky science fiction comedy is a characteristic feature by iconoclastic director Tim Burton, known to moviegoers for Beetlejuice, Edward Scissorhands, and The Nightmare Before Christmas. The storyline affectionately harkens back to the deadpan sincerity of such '50s and '60s science-fiction films as The Day the Earth Stood Still and War of the Worlds. Flying saucers have been reliably seen over the capitals of the world, and the whole world awaits with bated breath to see what will transpire. Among those waiting is the President of the United States (Jack Nicholson), who is assured by his science advisor (Pierce Brosnan) that the coming aliens are utterly peaceful. This advice is hotly contested by the military (led by Rod Steiger), who advices the President to annihilate them. When the aliens land, they are seen to be green, garish, and very cheerful. But appearances prove deceiving when the "friendly" aliens abruptly disintegrate the entire U.S. Congress. Hollywood notables appear in vast quantities in roles (and sub-plots) of all sizes in this zany feature. ~ Clarke Fountain, Rovi

    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
    Director Tim Burton brings his unique vision and sensibility to Roald Dahl's classic children's story in this lavish screen interpretation. Willy Wonka (Johnny Depp) is the secretive and wildly imaginative man behind the world's most celebrated candy company, and while the Wonka factory is famously closed to visitors, the reclusive candy man decides to give five lucky children a chance to see the inside of his operation by placing "golden tickets" in five randomly selected chocolate bars. Charlie Bucket (Freddie Highmore), whose poor but loving family lives literally in the shadow of the Wonka factory, is lucky enough to obtain one of the tickets, and Charlie, escorted by his Grandpa Joe (David Kelly), is in for the ride of a lifetime as he tours the strange and remarkable world of Wonka with fellow winners, media-obsessed Mike Teavee (Jordan Fry), harsh and greedy Veruca Salt (Julia Winter), gluttonous Augustus Gloop (Philip Wiegratz), and ultra-competitive Violet Beauregarde (AnnaSophia Robb). Over the course of the day, some of the children will learn difficult lessons about themselves, and one will go on to become Wonka's new right hand. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory also stars Christopher Lee, James Fox, and Noah Taylor; the book was famously adapted to the screen before in 1971 under the title Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, with Gene Wilder as the eccentric candy tycoon. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

  • Cast & Crew

    • Paul Reubens
      Paul Reubens - Pee-Wee Herman
    • Elizabeth Daily
      Elizabeth Daily - Dottie
    • Image coming soon
      Mark Holton - Francis
    • Diane Salinger
      Diane Salinger - Simone
    • Image coming soon
      Judd Omen - Mickey
    Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.