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Walking Dead Collection [2 Discs] [DVD]
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Overview

Special Features

  • Interactive menus
  • Original graphics
  • Film information
  • Chapters - direct scene access
  • Biography
  • Facts & trivia
  • Special collector's photo gallery

Synopsis

Seven Doors to Death
Affable comic actor Chick Chandler hadn't had a film starring role in years when Seven Doors to Death was produced in 1944, but the wartime leading-man shortage enabled him to secure top billing in this leisurely comedy/mystery. Chandler plays architect Jimmy McMillan, who designs an exclusive shopping center/apartment building with seven entrances. When a burglary-murder occurs in the building, practically every occupant is suspect, since every one had a convenient avenue of entrance. To find the genuine killer-and incidentally, to clear himself of suspicion-Jimmy plays detective, wandering through the building and mentally reconstructing the crime. Other veteran perfomers parading before the cameras include June Clyde, George Meeker, Gregory Gay, and motorcyle-cop-turned-actor Edgar Dearing. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Horror Rises from the Tomb
Spanish horror star Jacinto Molina, best known as Paul Naschy, stars in this bloody horror film from gore specialist Carlos Aured. Molina plays a knight who is decapitated and whose wife is cut in half, cursing his descendents when they come to the old mansion looking for his head. The knight's head is rejoined to his body, his wife (Cristina Suriani) is revived, and much mayhem follows. A maid has her head lopped off with a sickle, Suriani rips flesh from a man's back during sex, and zombies emerge from a nearby lake. Aured throws everything but the kitchen sink into this violent pastiche, but the engaging cast (including horror regulars Helga Line, Emma Cohen, and Vic Winner) and some creative touches make it worth seeing for Naschy devotees. One of the best Spanish horror films, this was the first effort of the nascent Profilmes production company, which turned out numerous genre efforts over the ensuing years. ~ Robert Firsching, Rovi

Carnival of Souls
A drag race turns to tragedy when one car, with three young women inside, topples over a bridge and into the muddy river below. The authorities drag the river, but the search is fruitless and the girls are presumed dead until a single survivor stumbles out of the water with no recollection of how she escaped. Mary Henry (Candace Hilligoss) decides to forget her strange experience and carry on with her plan to move to Utah to accept a job as a church organist. She rejects the notion that because her profession leads her to work in the church, she is obligated to worship as part of the congregation, and this cold approach to her work unnerves many around her. While driving to the new city, she experiences weird visions of a ghoulish man who stares at her through the windshield, and passes an abandonded carnival on a desolate stretch of highway outside of town to which she feels strangely drawn. Mary tries to live her life in private, ignoring invitations to worship by the minister of her church and the leering propositions of a neighbor in her rooming house. Soon the ghostly apparition from the highway is appearing more often, and she experiences eerie spells in which she becomes invisible to people on the street. A doctor tries to help, but he too is rejected, and eventually Mary realizes that the deserted carnival holds the secret to her destiny. ~ Fred Beldin, Rovi

I Bury the Living
Unjustly ignored by many books on the horror film, I Bury the Living is a bone-chilling little mood piece, almost completed dominated by Richard Boone. Expertly avoiding the obvious throughout the film, Boone gives a thoroughly credible performance of a troubled man who labors under the misapprehension that he is God. Boone plays the new chairman of a large cemetery; in his office is a map of the grounds, with black pins representing the occupied plots, and white pins representing plots that have been purchased but not yet filled. When Boone inadvertently mixes up the black and white pins, several of the plot owners suffer untimely deaths. Inevitably, Boone becomes convinced that he has the power of life and death--a conviction that doesn't completely dissipate once the secret behind the sudden deaths is revealed. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

I Eat Your Skin
Schlock producer Jerry Gross rescued this previously-unreleased 1964 clunker (originally titled Voodoo Blood Bath from utter anonymity, saddling it with a meaningless (but cute) new title for a now-legendary drive-in double bill with I Drink Your Blood. Whereas its companion film has gained a sordid reputation for being one of the first films ever to be branded with an "X" rating by the MPAA solely for graphic violence, this limp zombie nonsense bears no such mark of distinction. The story is set on a lush tropical island where a writer (William Joyce) arrives in search of material on voodoo legends for his latest novel. He eventually stumbles onto the secret laboratory of a mad scientist whose experiments with reversing the aging process have been turning his native subjects into bug-eyed, papier-mâché-faced zombies. Despite this daunting side-effect, the doc goes right on with his experiments, zombie numbers keep growing, and the natives are growing seriously restless. So restless, it turns out, that they are prepared to sacrifice the scientist's pretty daughter (Heather Hewitt) in retaliation. Not even silly enough to be amusing, this one is just plain dull. ~ Cavett Binion, Rovi

Cast & Crew

  • Chick Chandler
    Chick Chandler - Jimmy McMillan
  • June Clyde
    June Clyde - Mary Rawling
  • George Meeker
    George Meeker - Charles Eaton
  • Image coming soon
    Michael Raffetto - Capt. William Jaffe
  • Edgar Dearing
    Edgar Dearing - Claude Burns
Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.