Henry Jaglom Collection, Vol. 1: Love and Romance [3 Discs] [DVD]

As one of the most unique of all American filmmakers, writer-director Henry Jaglom qualifies as a true maverick, and one of the rare cinematic artists in North America to sound his own inimitable voice from project to project. Though his films explore a broad array of subjects, all constitute witty, self-reflexive explorations of the human heart, radiant with a remarkable level emotional courage. The three pictures in this Jaglom box set exemplify these qualities. The package begins with his 1985 Always. . . But Not Forever, a seriocomic exploration of Jaglom's divorce from first wife Patrice Townsend, in which Jaglom and Townsend play the two leads, David and Judy - sharing their last weekend together, with two other couples present. The second feature in the set, 1997's Déjà Vu, pays homage to soulmate love. Victoria Foyt, Jaglom's second wife (who co-scripted the movie with him), stars as Dana, a young woman who meets the man she was born to be with (Stephen Dillane) at the most inopportune moment - she's engaged to someone else, and he's already married. Finally, 1992's Venice/Venice stars Jaglom as Dean and Nelly Alard as Jeanne, in an impassioned romantic drama that comments on cinephilia, as it playfully explores the often blurred line between everyday reality and movie reality.
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Overview

Special Features

  • Closed Captioned

Synopsis

Always... But Not Forever
Henry Jaglom, the best professional "home movie" maker in the business, produced, directed, wrote and starred in Always. Also appearing is Jaglom's ex-wife Patrice Townsend, here cast as...his ex-wife. Showing up one night at Jaglom's home to finalize the divorce decree, Townsend is persuaded to stay by her former husband, who hopes to talk her out of dissolving the marriage. Sideline characters include Melissa Leo as Townsend's uninhibited sister, and Alan Rachins as a reclusive type. Mostly improvised, Always attempts to offer up a few sobering truths about relationships. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Venice / Venice
For sheer abject self-indulgence this side of an Eric Schaeffer movie, one need look no further than the films of Henry Jaglom. Jaglom's vanity productions require an intense Stalin-like loyalty to the filmmaker and his films going in, otherwise a viewer is lost. So when, in Venice/Venice, Henry Jaglom appears as a filmmaker named Dean at the Venice Film Festival, there promoting a film resembling a Henry Jaglom film, a viewer must give himself up to the force or walk out of the theater. Dean is the kind of pretentious Hollywood type who likes to wear his heart and his distribution contract on his sleeve, so when adoring European journalist Jeanne (Nelly Alard) inexplicably smiles at him the right way, filmgoers will come to understand why the film business is so attractive to wimpy film geeks. Jeanne and Dean fall in love and take a walking tour of Venice, but Jeanne pays no attention to the city, since she religiously hangs on every word Dean has to say regarding love, films, and destiny. Since there are more pearls of wisdom to be gloaned from this Bel-Air Gandhi, Jeanne willingly follows Dean back to Venice, California. Realizing that she has already spent too much time basking in the brilliance of Dean's sun, Penny (Melissa Leo), Dean's California girlfriend, obligingly offers to pack up and leave when she sees Dean returning to Southern California with Jeanne in tow. When Henry Jaglom talks, they all listen. ~ Paul Brenner, Rovi

Deja Vu
Los Angeles store owner Dana (Victoria Foyt) is shopping in Israel where a meeting with a mysterious woman leads her to Paris and the White Cliffs of Dover, an appropriate spot to fall in love with English painter Sean (Stephen Dillane) who is married. Soon, however, Dana is off to London to rejoin her business-partner/fiancé Alex (Michael Brandon). Dana and Alex, and Sean and his wife all wind up together as weekend house guests of John ('60s rock performer Noel Harrison), brother of Skelly (Vanessa Redgrave). With true love looming on the horizon, Dana and Sean decide to abandon their companions for each other. The screenplay was written by Foyt and director Henry Jaglom, who took a different approach to the theme of love and affection in his autobiographical Always (1985). ~ Bhob Stewart, Rovi

Cast & Crew

  • Image coming soon
    Patrice Townsend - Judy
  • Henry Jaglom
    Henry Jaglom - David
  • Image coming soon
    Joanna Frank - Lucy
  • Alan Rachins
    Alan Rachins - Eddie
  • Melissa Leo
    Melissa Leo - Peggy
Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.