La Jetee/Sans Soleil [Criterion Collection] [Blu-ray]

$27.99
Cardmember Offers

Overview

Ratings & Reviews

Overall Customer Rating:
Rating 5 out of 5 stars.
5.0
100% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (1 out of 1)

Special Features

  • Restored high-definition digital transfers, approved by Director Chris Marker, with uncompressed monaural soundtracks
  • Two interviews with filmmaker Jean-Pierre Gorin
  • Chris on Chris, a video piece on Marker by Filmmaker and Critic Chris Darke
  • Two excerpt from the French television series Court-circuit (Le Magazine): a look at David Bowie's music video for the song "Jump They Say", inspired by La Jetée, and an analysis of Hitchcock's Vertigo and its influence on Marker
  • Junkopia, a six-minute film by Marker, Frank Simone, and John Chapman about the Emeryville Mudflats
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by Marker scholar Catherine Lupton, an interview with Marker, notes on the films and filmmaking by Marker, and more

Synopsis

La jetée
The movie that inspired Terry Gilliam's 12 Monkeys, Chris Marker's La jetée is a landmark of science-fiction filmmaking, a 28-minute masterpiece told almost entirely in still frames. Set in a post-apocalyptic near-future, it tells the story of an unnamed man whose vivid childhood recollections make him the perfect guinea pig for an experiment in time travel. After a lengthy and nightmarish period of conditioning, he is sent into the past, where he falls in love with a woman whom he once saw on a pier. At the experiment's conclusion, he is visited by an advanced race, who offer him the opportunity to journey into their future world, but he instead requests that they send him permanently into the past, where he can remain with the woman of his dreams. A singular experience. ~ Jason Ankeny, Rovi

Sans Soleil
Titled after a song cycle by Mussorgsky, Sans Soleil is a 1982 nonlinear essay film by elusive documentary filmmaker Chris Marker. It's a collage of images gathered from Japan, Africa, Iceland, San Francisco, and France -- all presented without direct sound. The soundtrack consists of occasional spells of electronic music while an unseen woman's voice (Alexandra Stewart) narrates letters written by a possibly fictional traveler in poetic verse. Beginning with the phrase "He wrote me," each segment explores some philosophical inquiry of matters as broad as modern culture, technology, consciousness, Japanese television, and even the act of filming itself. Some of the first images include children in Iceland, a ferry in Hokkido, a carnival in Guinea-Bissau, girls in Cape Verde, and a shrine to cats in Tokyo. There's also a creepy JFK robot, petrified animals left by desert drought, and teenagers dancing in a public square. The seemingly miscellaneous footage is made up of archive clips, synthesized video sequences, and some images collected by Marker's colleagues. It's randomly assembled, jumping from one continent to another in the same breath. It remains one of the director's masterpiece accomplishments. ~ Andrea LeVasseur, Rovi

Cast & Crew

  • Image coming soon
    Jean Negroni - Narrator
  • Image coming soon
    Étienne Becker
  • Image coming soon
    Jacques Ledoux - The Experimentor
  • Image coming soon
    Helene Chatelain - The Woman

Overall Customer Rating

5 out of 55.0
1 Reviews
100%of customers recommend this product.

Most Helpful ReviewsSee all reviews

    Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.