Linksys - EA9500 Max-Stream AC5400 Tri-Band Wi-Fi Router - black

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Your household is busy streaming media, working online, and playing games every day. This Linksys Wi-Fi Router will expand your network coverage, send signals directly to your devices, and deliver a lag-free connection, even when you’re all online at the same time.

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$399.99

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    Overview

    What's Included


    • Linksys EA9500 Max-Stream AC5400 Tri-Band Wi-Fi Router
    • Owner's manual

    Ratings & Reviews


    Overall Customer Rating:
    94% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (1889 out of 2021)

    Features


    Next-Gen AC Wi-Fi

    Supercharge your home office and entertainment experience. Tri-band technology lets you connect more devices, and offers ultra-fast combined Wi-Fi speeds of up to 5.3 Gbps.

    MU-MIMO technology

    Work and play online simultaneously. You won’t have to worry about slowdown or interference, even when multiple devices are in use.

    Beamforming technology

    Get clearer coverage. Targeted Wi-Fi signals will stream directly to each device.

    8 high performance antennas

    Expand your home network’s range. You’ll experience stronger, faster Wi-Fi even in a very large house.

    Smart Wi-Fi app

    Monitor and manage your Wi-Fi network from anywhere, using your smartphone or tablet. Create a guest network, set up parental controls, and prioritize devices that need more speed.

    Seamless roaming

    Link to a MAX-STREAM Range Extender (not included). Your enabled devices will automatically switch to the strongest Wi-Fi signal available.

    Built-in Ethernet and USB connections

    Connect computers, hard drives, printers, and more wired devices with 8 Gigabit LAN ports, 1 Gigabit WAN port, and 2 USB ports.

    Quick start guide

    Enjoy simple and straightforward router setup as you connect with the Linksys secure network.

    WPA/WPA2 and an SPI Firewall

    With up to 128-bit WEP encryption to keep your information protected.

    System requirements

    Internet Explorer® 8, Safari® 5 (for Mac®), Firefox® 8, and Google Chrome™.


    Customer rating

    4.6
    94%
    would recommend to a friend

    Expert rating

    4.0

    Pros

    Cons

    • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

      Overkill for Most, Underkill for the Rest

      Posted
      aarondr
      • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      The EA9500 is Linksys’s ultra-high end WiFi router. I still remember the days when $100-200 routers were the high end - now if you’re buying $200 routers, you’re decidedly in the mid-range for most manufacturers. The EA9500 is a tri-band monster that brandishes 8 external adjustable antennas, 8 gigabit LAN ports, USB 3.0, and the latest and greatest 802.11ac standards. The SoC used is Broadcom’s BCM4709C0, which offers an interesting 5 core setup, a dual core Cortex-A9 main CPU with dedicated Corex-A7’s per each WiFi band. Like other recent Linksys CES hardware, the EA9500 is a Wave 2 802.11ac WiFi devices. The biggest change with wave 2 is MU-MIMO. What does MU-MIMO do? Well the more WiFi clients you have the ‘slower’ your wireless network gets since each transmit and receive happens as a timeslice of airtime. If you have 4 clients, client 1 sends/receives, then client 2 sends/receives etc. This all happens so fast you don’t notice. But the more clients you add, the slower you get. 802.11ac’s MU-MIMO helps solve this by allowing groups of clients to exist. Wireless clients group together and are allowed to receive at the same time (802.11ax will introduce send and receive MU-MIMO). All this fanciness is great since more and more of our devices rely on WiFi in the home. The downside: MU-MIMO requires that the client support the technology, and as of the initial release, there aren’t many clients. But hardware manufacturers keep pushing bigger and fancier routers, and eventually the clients will catch up. I once felt like AC was almost unnecessary since so few clients supported 802.11ac, but now almost all my clients are AC, so this router’s time will come. Throw on top of that the EA9500 also features band steering for it’s dual 5Ghz bands, meaning it can intelligently balance large amounts of clients between the two radios. The advantage of buying a router like this is future proofing, and handling a boatload of high bandwidth clients. Hardware It used to be that 5Ghz suffered range issues, any more than a single wall would usually leave you with too little signal. In fact my WNDR3700’s 5Ghz network would oftentimes drop out or barely work. However, that is no longer the case as most of the 5Ghz devices I’ve worked with recently push strong 5Ghz signal much further. This is no exception with the EA9500, as I had no range issues, even with the router placed in one corner of my 3000+ sqft house. Having 8 external antennas certainly helps it’s case, but it is still impressive to have such good range. Even more impressive is what 802.11ac can deliver with just a little signal. If you haven’t jumped on the AC train yet, it’s time! The EA9500 has an interesting accompaniment of 8 LAN ports in addition to the single WAN port. This build in switch actually leads to an interesting theoretical advantage over most AC routers - potentially multiple wired link aggregated clients. While I’ve already seen a 3x3 client peek out a gigabit wired connection, I could imagine a 4x4 client could actually keep it pegged under right circumstances. With 8 ports, you could hook up a NAS or computer and use link aggregation on the wired network to actually go beyond the limitations of a single wired connection and be able to do 2Gb. I never thought I’d be saying it, but you could actually use the greater bandwidth provided by the wireless connection. Unfortunately I do not have a 4x4 client, nor a spare NAS with link aggregation to test this theory, but it definitely gives perspective on why you’d want a larger switch on one of these bad boys. I stumbled across a review saying this wasn’t a feature of this router, but link aggregation/teaming is usually a feature of the client, not the switch, so I see no reason it wouldn’t work (I effectively team 2 NICs on my Windows Server 2012 R2). In my real world testing, I found quite speedy WiFi with 802.11ac clients. Even in a 2x2 device could manage 70MB/sec. A 3x3 MacBook Pro was able to peek out gigabit wired at 110Mb/sec which was an eye-openner. These speeds were observed copying to my Windows based NAS. Unfortunately I saw similar or worse performance for the SMB and FTP though USB shares when compared to the EA7500. For testing I used a USB 3.0 drive (same one I referenced in the EA7500 review). Copying to and from I saw read and write over SMB at 20-30 MB/sec and 15-25MB/sec respectively. FTP generally started out slow but increased in speed as the transfer went on. I saw peaks around 50-60MB/sec read, and around 25-30MB/sec write. While these numbers are in the same ballpark as the EA7500, they are still a disappointment compared to dedicated NAS hardware. Hardware wise, I find the SoC disappointing. Broadcom’s BCM47094 dual core + 3 cores is certainly capable. While this setup brings quite a bit of raw compute power, the Cortex-A9 BCM47094 main CPU isn’t as theoretically powerful as what you find in the EA7500, which is a bit of a disappointment. That said, I doubt it matters given the software, but one would guess if something like OpenVPN was ported to the firmware, that you’d see better throughput on the EA7500. I can’t be certain of that (as many things factor into that), but it’s a theory I feel somewhat confident in based on my knowledge of ARM CPUs. Furthermore the flash and RAM found on this device (256MB RAM, 128MB flash) is adequate, but not category leading. Does it matter? Again probably not, but WRT series has double the RAM. For me a tri-band router has always been a bit of a silly undertaking, but I can start to understand the appeal when you're suggesting this for a very large household. As it stands today I have around 15 WiFi clients most on the 5Ghz band, and I'm a small household. I can imagine a household with 3 teenagers and friend along with 2 adults and their devices would bring a much larger foot-print. Tri-band is a niche, and if you need peak performance from multiple high-end clients, it actually makes sense, otherwise it's a bit overkill. Software Firmware wise, you’ll find the standard Smart WiFi interface, the same found on the EA7500. This interface is a far cry from the WRT-54G days of yesteryear. Here we have a modern single page web app, with JQuery, Ajax, and -gasp- HTML5. The user experience is much better than other brands of consumer routers I’ve used (I’m looking at you Netgear with your ugly tables, and iframes). That said - my comments on this interface both criticism and compliments have not changed. Smart WiFi exceeds at making hard thing easy, but lacks some degree on common sense such as transport security on guest networks. Once again VPN is absent. Conclusion I can’t keep from feeling that the EA9500 is a bit of a let-down. Yes, the hardware is amazingly capable, but I can’t but keep from feeling that some of the hardware and software is disappointing for it’s price point. Don’t get me wrong - I praised the ease of use and parental features found in the EA7500’s firmware, which is identical to the EA9500’s. It was really good as far as stock firmwares go, however even in the EA7500’s price range I said it was a bit lean on features. Unfortunately there’s no VPN, no printer (AirPrint or otherwise) support, only basic NAS (SMB and FTP) with no personal ‘cloud’ access, and only very basic diagnostic tools. As one of my peer reviewers pointed out, if you change the device to AP mode, USB capabilities go out the door - and in fact almost all features go out the door (as the focus in the firmware is QoS, access control, etc - related to gateway/router functionality). This is again forgivable on lower end devices, and excusable on more expensive devices that might keep a degree of ‘ease of use’ over feature bloat. Now here we are looking at a $400 router that essentially adds another 5GHz band and an additional antenna per band, but that’s it. To add insult to injury, most of your WiFi clients won’t and for the foreseeable future support 4x4:4 - meaning the claims of 2166 require clients that are few and far in between. Most devices are going to be 1x1 (most phones), 2x2 (iPads, higher end tablets, Retina MacBook, most ultrabooks), or 3x3 (MacBook Pro, high end Windows). Who has a 4x4 client? Very few unfortunately. 4x4 specs have been out for over 10 years (part of the 802.11n spec), but I have yet to see one client in person. Essentially, if you don’t seek out and find one of these high end clients - ostensibly to connect several wired devices from one location ala client-bridge mode, you’d be wasting the potential of this router. I like the direction Linksys was going with the EA7500. It offered MU-MIMO future-proofing, but provided compatibility with almost all 802.11ac WiFi clients with a very fast SoC. It offered a simple, intuitive interface for home users that met realistic needs. A $200 MSRP fell in line with other high end devices, but I could forgive some of the features it missed since it excelled at the fundamentals you would want in a router. However when we work our way up to the EA9500, we double our price point, add hardware that only enthusiasts would need without backing it up with software enthusiasts would want. If I’m blowing $400 on a router I expect it to be an appliance that can fill multiple roles. That said, unless you have very specific needs, you’ll be better off with the EA7500. The EA9500 is a solid performer, and I cannot help but underscore how solid the WiFi performance is. But at it's MSRP, it's no match for many of the competitors out there.

      I would recommend this to a friend

      • Brand response

        Linksys Staff

        Hi, Aarondr,

        Thank you for a very detailed product review. It is true that you can take advantage of the router's full features if you have a MU-MIMO-ready device. You might not have one right now but who knows if you'll decide to get one in the future.

        We understand your feedback about the router's chip and we'll surely relay it to the Engineering team; same goes with what you think about some features that should be functional with the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi app.

        Talking about the transfer speed, it may have been affected by some interferences if you have tested it using your wireless devices. This might be too basic but have you tried optimizing the wireless settings?

        Feel free to send us an email at LinksysCares@linksys.com if you want to share more observations or for assistance. We'd be happy to hear from you and don't forget to indicate your full name, phone number, location, and the link to this post.


        Regards,

        Linksys Support Linksys

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Router In A League Of Its Own

      Posted
      ryanmcv
      • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member
      • Top 250 ContributorTop 250 Contributor

      With dozens of Wi-Fi enabled devices in my home, I've long been searching for a router that can deliver maximum speeds to all devices with no interference. Having used mid-range ($150-$200) routers for the past several years, I thought I had reached the peak of Wi-Fi performance in my home. I've always been very skeptical of high-end ($300+) routers -- Can a tri-band router really make that much of a difference? As it turns out, yes it can -- especially if you have tons of devices and/or live in a dense housing development. Here's my take: Setup and management: - This thing is BIG, but it looks pretty cool. Eight antennas come pre-installed -- you simply flip them up-right. - The Linksys EA9500 is a breeze to setup. If you're feeling super lazy, you can pretty much plug in the router, connect your cable or DSL modem, and be done with it. The router comes with a pre-set network name and password, which is printed on the bottom of the device. However, most people will want to customize these settings (along with a few others). This can be done easily by navigating to 192.168.1.1 in your web browser or by creating an account at the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi website. Creating this account allows you to manage your router's settings from anywhere in the world. - The setup/administration interface is somewhat elementary, but it gets the job done. The Network Map feature is great to visualize all of the devices connected to the network and determine which of the three bands they are connected to (2.4GHz, 5GHz[1], or 5GHz[2]). You can also set parental controls to limit the amount of time specific devices can access the Internet. Other options include security settings, guest access, and settings for external storage. Performance and Features: - The defining feature of the EA9500 is the inclusion of an additional 5GHz wireless band. Using a technology that Linksys calls "Smart Connect," the router intelligently assigns devices to one of the two 5GHz Wi-Fi bands for higher performance. The router will “steer” devices to the optimum band, effectively telling devices to disconnect and reconnect to the other radio within the 5GHz band as needed. This process is seamless and ensures that neither of the two 5GHz bands becomes congested. With 5GHz-enabled devices ('N' and 'AC') becoming the norm, a tri-band router like this will give you ample room to grow. - When connecting via 5GHz, I consistently max out my Internet download and upload speeds (130 mbps/15 mbps). Transferring files between two 802.11ac-equipped laptops on the network is astonishingly fast: I clocked one of the local transfers at nearly 450 mbps. - Performance on the 2.4GHz band is acceptable, but pales in comparison to 5GHz. Speeds fluctuate greatly and I struggled to reach more than 100 mbps on most tests. I think this is more a limitation of the 2.4GHz band than it is of the router itself. - Wireless range is excellent. I only have a 1,200 sq. ft. apartment, but I receive a full signal anywhere I go. - My favorite feature is the external storage capability. I plugged in a 3 TB external hard drive and stream video files to my Apple TV with zero stuttering or buffering. You can even enable an FTP feature to access an external hard drive from anywhere with an Internet connection. Final Thoughts: I was skeptical of this ultra-premium router, but I think I've finally found "the one." The performance and feature set of the EA9500 are truly top-of-the-line, especially if you have tons of devices equipped with 802.11n or 802.11ac that can take advantage of the two 5GHz bands. The remote management and external storage features enable you to create your own personal "cloud." If you want the best possible WI-FI performance in your home, don't be put off by the price tag. The EA9500 looks to provide stellar performance for years to come.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      A Beast of a Home/Small Business Router!

      Posted
      ITJim
      • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      This is by far the most macho networking device I think I have ever had the privilege to integrate into my home network. To give you some context, my home network consists of multiple phones and tablets, laptops, desktops, two TVs, two network enabled audio receivers, an Xbox, Wii U, multiple 1GB network switches, a network area storage device, multiple smart BD players, guests that come over to borrow my bandwidth from time to time, and a bunch of other stuff that I’m probably forgetting about. My home isn’t quite a “smart home” yet but with the Internet of Things taking hold it won’t be long before we all will be investing in beefier networking equipment to keep everything connected. That is where the Linksys EA9500 AMX-Steam comes in. Before I go much further I was asked to give an honest review of this product by BB and I’m going to do just that. Physically, this device is massive. It is the largest piece of networking equipment I’ve seen for the Home/Small Office space. I’ve had a lot of home networking products over the years and this one wins on weight and size. The antennas are industrial looking and strangely attractive as far as antennas go. Be sure to pick a roomy, stable location for this device. The box had plenty of packing to protect it during shipping. My device arrived in a box that looked like it was kicked a few times and then run over. But the device and its contents didn’t have a scratch. The initial setup process was fairly easy and straight forward. If you are part of the set and forget crowd, then simply follow the four-page quick setup guide that comes with the device and you’ll be up and running in about five minutes. For once the marketing matches the experience. However, if you want to dive deeper into your router for a more custom installation then you are looking at 30 minutes minimum setup time. I am impressed with the amount of work Linksys put into consumerizing the graphical user interfaces. It is fairly straight forward and accessible for a network device. I used the quick setup feature first and then did a deep dive into the advanced features. My network is fairly complex with a few older pieces of tech that simply would not work without some additional customization. Setting up my wireless devices was very easy. I gave each network a name, set the password, and then added the information into each one of my wireless devices. I did have one challenge with a Samsung TV. The TV was incapable of speaking to an 802.11n that also leverage the 80hz band. I don’t know why since the router should have stepped the frequency down to accommodate the TV. The solution was to split the 5Ghz networks in two, assign one to a 40hz band, and then assign the TV to that WI-FI network. The other network was set to 802.11ac with an 80hz band for future technology. Maybe some future firmware update will address this issue. My wired devices were easier. I have a pre-existing 8-port 1GB switch that most of my network runs through. My old router had a 1GB switch built in, however, it didn’t have enough ports to support my network. It was also a poorly performing switch. The separate switch removed the network load to behind the router so that the router could focus on internet and wireless communications. This setup served me well for over a year. The EA9500 comes with a built in 8 port GB Switch. Since Linksys chose to brag about how much of a beast this router is I chose to challenge their marketing gods. For my test I used a music library containing 43GB of uncompressed FLAC formatted music. To put this into context, a 3 minutes MP3 is about 7mb. A 3 minutes uncompressed FLAC music file is about 100MB. In find the larger files easier to monitor and measure. I chose to move the folder over the wireless and the wired networks using the router for all wireless communications. I started with the wired devices. All devices performed admirably and in line with what I was expecting. At 10/100 speeds I was pushing 98mbs or roughly 11.3 MB/s. At 10/100/1000 speeds I was pushing 800mbs or roughly 92 MB/s. This is from source to my computer. To confirm my results, I hooked my 10/100/1000 network switch up (no router this time) and ran the same tests. I got the same results. The end result is I retired network switch and am using the router in its place. One less network hop on my network should improve performance slightly and now there is one less device that I need to manage. Win/win! Performing this same test with my wireless network I found that my 802.11g 2.4gz connection was maxed out at 98mbs. That is better than the 56mbs 802.11g specification at this frequency. I also have several 802.11n devices on my network that range in top speeds from 300mbs to 450mbs. Both tests came in about half of the max specification. One thing to keep in mind is that network speed is governed by the slowest connection. In general, I have found that the 5ghz frequencies are not as consistent as the lower 2.4ghz frequencies in both distance and reliability and is completely dependent on location. The location for my router is in the worst possible place for my home; the basement. For these tests I was in direct line of site of the router but there is a lot of stuff in the basement that can generate interference such as electrical wires, my furnace, copper pipes that pick and absorb RF, concrete walls, the floor above, and boxes full of stuff that will often degrade and block signals. My disclaimer is that your personal experience may be much different from mine. Over all though I am happy with the results because the performance is already better than the router the EA9500 replaced. I could not test the 802.11ac performance. I do not currently own any devices, other than the router, that are compatible with the 802.11ac specification. One feature that is a head scratcher is the LED screen on the top of the EA9500. I haven’t figured out why Linksys wasted its time or treasure on this feature. It displays their logo and a bunch of white bars. When the router boots up the white bars are accompanied by some little blue bars. And that’s it! It’s pretty, but other than that it doesn’t server any purpose. The router does have a feature that allows the lights on the router to be turned off. I chose to turn this feature off. No sense in wasting electricity on a useless function. There is a novel network map in the router’s interface. It is nice to see all of the active devices on the network. However, I would have loved to see a bandwidth meter of some kind showing how much bandwidth each device was eating up. This way I could tell who, or what, was killing my connection to my favorite game. On my old router I could tell at a glance if more than one person was streaming video or music. It may seem like a silly feature but it does come in handy. Once you’ve had it with other products you learn to rely upon it for valuable information about your network behavior. It can also help in finding trouble spots on your network. Some of you are probably asking if you can stream movies and play games with the EA9500. I have a 15mb downstream connection and 1mb upstream connection. Definitely not the best. I streamed a Netflix movie on my computer, another Netflix movie on my tablet, a constant stream of full screen video from YouTube to my laptop, Pandora to my home theater receiver, put the wife on Facebook with her laptop, and then loaded up my favorite 24 player, multiplayer video game. The game showed a few moments where my ping was over 200ms but for the most part it was steady at 50ms. 50ms is average latency when this same game is the only traffic on my network. Under my own router the above scenario would net me a 400ms to 900ms latency. In the world of online gaming this is huge and is often the difference between a great game and terrible experience. The EA9500 did an excellent job of managing the network traffic and available bandwidth. Final thoughts. Can I run a sophisticated, Internet of Things, home of the future with this thing? Yes. Can I operate that fancy new Samsung, uh Android, uh cool refrigerator that Best Buy sells? Without a doubt. Can I setup and satisfy the needs of a small office with this? I work from home a lot and do video conferencing, Voice over IP, remote server connection, and remote collaboration with my colleagues via a secure, encrypted VPN connection. So, yes! Do you need this? If you are a power user like me, have a family with high bandwidth demands, or have an eye towards future proofing your technologically advanced lifestyle then yes, I think you are the target audience for this device. If you have a small office with limited space, then this device will also fulfill your needs. If you live in a one-bedroom apartment with a laptop and a cell phone then no, this product is definitely overkill for you. You can get away with a smaller, less powerful model. I went into this product skeptical that it was more snake oil marketing fantasy and came away a believer that this product is what it claims to be. It will be interesting to see what others have to say about. My experience thus far has been very positive and will recommend this for anyone who has a big home, small office with a few employees, or high bandwidth demands and a lot of old and new wireless technology that needs to coexist.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Supercharge tri-band router for ultra streaming

      Posted
      Gman71
      • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

      The Linksys Max-Stream AC5400 Mu-MIMO Gigabit Router with MU-MIMO (model EA9500). For fair disclosure, I consider myself to be a novice techy….I know just enough to be dangerous, but not enough to be an expert. Tech and Spec. According to the supporting documentation, published white papers and other articles, the Linksys EA9500 Max-Stream AC5400 is designed to provide WiFi to multiple users and devices simultaneously, which is called( Mulit-User MIMO (Multi-User, Multiple-Input, Multiple-Output or MU-MIMO). The EA9500 is targeted to help users get the most use for both online gaming, large file uploads, streaming of videos & movies and other media without the lag or cut off. The router has three bands. Two 5GHz bands and one 2.4GHz band. The Gigabit router has eight Gigabit network ports and two USB ports (one USB 3.0). Another plus to this router is its compatible with Mac, Windows 7, 8 & 10. The form of this new gigabit router is very nice. It’s kind of intimidating at first with all the antennas and its new form size. Its a bit larger than their normal form and it has 8 external adjustable antennas. This router has the ability to manage multiple streams of data with the use of the eight adjustable external antennas which makes it possible for Linksys’ Beam-forming technology to direct the Wi-Fi signals to each of the wireless devises connected to the router. This allows for the signal to provide increased coverage and reception. An additional new improvement I can see is they have increased the stability of the unit and improved airflow under the unit with larger foot pads. My Experience To be fair in my review and to give Linksys a fair shot to test out the ease of setup I removed the old router and all of the connections I had to see how easy it would be to setup following the Quick Start Guide. I am replacing an older Linksys router that is about 14 months old. I’m the type of person that when something is supposed to be easy to do or setup…it never is for me …it never works. So let me just save everyone some time and tell you ….setup was a snap. It worked on the first try and it went perfect. Upon opening the sealed box the typical clean packaging is in play. Very well protected and all the item you need are in very plane site and easy to unpack. The setup guide is a very simple 4 step setup process. One of the nice new features in the setup is how Linksys created a very easy to see and understand process to make sure you know the router is connected. They have created a process that lets you know the router is ready for setup with a blue LED on the top of the unit. The LED’s scroll across the top as its looking for the connection and when the unit is connected the blue LED’s stop and the Linksys log appears. This is a nice simple to understand interface during setup that lets you visually see you are connected and ready to start the next step. Setup is pretty straight forward with step 1 replacing and uncommenting any existing routers if you have them and plugging in and powering up the router. Step 2 connecting the router to your internet cable which Linksys has clearly labeled. Step 3 connecting to the internet and assigning the wireless network with the default network name and password to setup up the connection. Then finally, step 4 connecting to LinksysSmartWIFi.com to make all of your connections and setup tweaks. One nice setup feature they have applied is the required renaming of the default Network and the Password in order to proceed. I still know people that use the default router setup as their admin setup; this is a great feature they have put in place. A nice new feature during the setup process is the ability to manage the login credential to the 3 channels either independently of each other with unique access codes or with a check box to allow the router to manage them as with one access code. Linksys continues to use the LinksysSmart WiFi interface with this new router. Now I like the Smart WiFI setup Linksys originally created. But Linksys made some improvements to the interface. The new big change is with the Network Map which is a really nice new feature. You now get to see the router and all the connections visually. For most that won’t seem like a big change, but it is. You can now see all the connections and which band they are on as it labels it and shows you the signal connection as live and disconnected from the router. In addition, another cool feature is the ability to filter in the Network Map. You can filter out those items you don’t want to see from a drop down menu with some standard filters. This is great to track down particular connections you need to focus on without the distraction of the other connections. Priority assignment of connections. Now for my household we have about 15 items connected at all times and it can almost double when people come over. Another nice feature is the ability to assign priority to connected devices. So if you want to make sure you have a connection with a particular device or to stream a video or have other people guaranteed to be connected in general, you have the ability to manage and prioritize the connections. Overall, I really think this new Network Map is a great feature. The rest of the LinksysSmart WiFi interface is pretty much the same with the exception of the ability to see and manage a network connected device and media to stream. Currently, I am replacing my NAS device with a new unit I am building. So for now I don’t have any information on this. But from the specs and the streaming we have done this router can easily handle the demands of a NAS. It has 2 USB ports one is a USB 3.0. Signal Strength. The signal strength is very strong. I have a rather large 2 story home with a basement. Before the new router the signal strength on the second floor was at best 50% of the wifi bars on the second floor. In the basement it was less about 30%. With the new router we have increased our signal strength to just about 75% to 80%. In the basement it has gone up to about 60% In addition, we utilize our outdoor space and before we barely got any signal outside the house. Now we have at least 40% signal strength out on our patio. I would say that this new router has clearly made a big difference for us. In addition to signal strength, we have also been testing the load capacity of the new router. I can say that we have deliberately have been pushing the load limits, downloads and streaming with positive outcomes. At one time we had two videos streaming from Netflix and about a dozen users all on with multiple devices that included, Ipads, Kindles, xbox, cell phones and Ipods all at one time. No one had any lag, buffering or connection interruptions. With my old router, I would have had the lag, buffering and disconnect with that many on at one time putting that much demand to my network. Overall, I am quite impressed and very satisfied with the new router. I would recommend this to those that need the power to manage multiple devices and anyone that is trying to stream 4K or Ultra HD . I am planning on adding the Linksys Max-Stream AC 1900 WiFI Range Extender model RE 7000 to see what improvements can be accomplished with this other new technology from Linksys.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Beast Router: Ridiculous Range!!!

      Posted
      Dragonhunter281
      • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member
      • Top 500 ContributorTop 500 Contributor

      The EA9500 Linksys router may just as well be the best router I have personally used. At its cost, however, it might be out of range for the average user, but let not deter you from considering all that it has to offer. Granted, if you have a large home and having a plethora of devices connected all at once is a necessity, then the EA9500 might just fit your needs. Speed is written all over this insane device. For me personally, the router was a life saver. Previously, the Wi-Fi in our home was horribly slow and inconsistent. It was so bad that even just one room over from where the old router was located, you would be lucky to even get a consistent strong signal. On the opposite side of the house, coverage was almost non-existent. Traditionally, I have always been skeptical at networking claims of improved speed or range as so many factors contribute to the overall experience. That all drastically changed with the EA9500. From the minute you open the box, the size of the EA9500 and sheer weight of it screams quality. The size of the EA9500 will require a relatively large flat, sturdy surface to store this router. It is also quite heavy for a router, weighing around 3-4 pounds. Furthermore, the plastic chassis was constructed quite well. It did not feel too cheap. The eight antennas will need to be carefully moved to the upright position. Overall, they felt pretty flexible but I would strongly caution that once they are situated upright, they are left alone afterwards. On the back of the unit, there are eight Ethernet Gigabit ports, along with one labeled internet for your original source connection. Furthermore, one USB 3.0 and one 2.0 port are available for sharing various devices. It was also nice that the two USB ports support the NTFS file system for storage. HFS and FAT are also supported. In addition to the physical aspect of the EA9500, for wireless capabilities, it features a triple channel design that is split up by 2x5 GHZ channels and one regular 2.4 GHZ. The 4x4 MU-MIMO facilitates the use of multiple devices on your network. Thus, the EA9500 allows four data streams per band. In addition, setup was straightforward and I did not have any issues connecting the router. I connected the main internet cable from our PACE modem to the port labeled internet and then I connected my laptop to the first Ethernet port. I was able to access the Smart Wi-Fi website and connected using the included password. The main screen shows all the various devices connected and was fairly straightforward. One feature I personally liked was the ability to split the two 5 GHZ channels by disabling an option called band steering. As a personal preference, I liked to see where I am physically connected to, thus I chose to disable it. Overall, the web browser configuration will require you to tinker with it so you can familiarize yourself with it. It was quite simple. The range of the EA9500 was perhaps the greatest improvement over our previous Wi-Fi setup. In our 2700 sq ft home, any room other than the study where the actual router was located received only three bars or less. Furthermore, latency and inconsistent drops plagued the whole house even in the study. In our TV room upstairs, which usually has a decent signal as it is directly above the study, I noticed our Sony BDP-S3500 bluray player kept bouncing connection strength anywhere from 20%-95% and kept spiking inconsistently up and down. Throughout the whole house, phones, tablets and laptops displayed similar behavior. Our speed test in my upstairs bedroom showed 13 MBPS download and around 34ms in latency. Immediately repeating the same test, I barely received 5 MBPS and a spike in latency over 150ms. The EA9500 was then connected and night and day does not even scratch the surface of the improvement. Every single room is literally full Wi-Fi signal strength, and consistent speeds of 20-22 MBPS were noted in almost every single test I performed. In addition, I noted latency was around 24 ms or lower. Fortunately, in almost every test I performed, the results were nearly identical to the one before it regardless of location. The bluray player showed consistent 90-100% connection strength and rarely went below 98%. Furthermore, in the kitchen where previously WI-FI signal would be so poor that some devices would disconnect altogether, we now had full strength and consistent speeds as if we were directly in front of our EA9500. Lastly, in our backyard, where before I couldn't connect at all, I was able to pick up almost full signal on the 2.4 GHZ channel. On the 5 GHZ channel, I was expecting a much weaker signal since by default it does not reach as far as the 2.4 GHZ one. However, I was still able to pick it up and connect to even at poor range; ironically, it ran exponentially faster and consistent than even a full set of strength bars on our old router. Absolutely stunning! I am confident you would see similar range improvements as well. Furthermore, I would caution that while speed improvements may correlate with improved range, most speed improvements are influenced more heavily by ISPs and your particular speed. Thus, while you may see an increase in speed, do not expect it to be exponentially faster than what your ISP has you capped at. For us, the EA9500 brought consistency to our network, and we are finally receiving our correct speed that is listed in our service. Another aspect of the EA9500 I would like to mention is its Max-Stream capabilities when paired with extenders; in my case, I had the pleasure of testing the RE7000. I would like to mention that when the range extender is connected to the EA9500, it automatically detected that my EA9500 was Max Stream ready and asked if I would like to enable the feature. Similarly, like the band steering I mentioned earlier, the range extender and the EA9500 are essentially merged under the same SSID, except here it's worth noting that it is obviously two physical devices as oppose to two channels. I want to strongly caution that your results will vary here depending on how you setup the range extender (i.e. wirelessly or as a wired access point), internet speed of your service, and the physical location of the router and extender. Nonetheless, the feature did work as intended and I noticed on the Smart Wi-Fi utility home page the RE7000 was listed with Max Stream enabled. The EA9500 has pushed our network to a place I never thought possible by one device. No longer do we have inconsistent speeds, lag spikes, or stuttering on any device. The solid construction and premium feel to the router itself has made this an unbelievable experience. It has more than improved our range and we are now able to consistently access the internet anywhere in the house. Although the router itself does come at a cost, it has more than lived up to what it was designed to do. However, it is no secret that EA9500's target audience is firmly positioned for the enthusiast crowd or power users who want the absolute best. It absolutely performs like a top end product as its cost should indicate. Consequently, though, it is not for everyone and the majority would perhaps benefit by looking at cheaper alternatives. I strongly recommend the EA9500 and believe it is an exceptional product, but caution equally that cheaper routers do exist. In the end, if you still desire the best, the EA9500 may just serve you a satisfying full course of internet.

      I would recommend this to a friend

      • Brand response

        Linksys Staff

        Hi, Dragonhunter281,

        We're happy to hear that your new EA9500 router made a significant improvement on your Wi-Fi and the performance is really stunning! Allow us to share your experience with our Team.

        For queries and assistance, contact us directly at LinksysCares@linksys.com, anytime.

        We'd be more than happy to serve you.


        Regards,

        Jay
        Linksys Support Linksys

    • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

      Powerful BeefyBeast Tri-Band Gigabit MUMIMO Router

      Posted
      CriticalEye
      • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      Linksys EA9500 Max-Stream AC5400 Tri-Band Wi-Fi Gigabit MU-MIMO Router-Black by Belkin Intro: This tri-band quad-stream (4 simultaneous streams per band) wireless gigabit router provides 3 independent Wi-Fi band radios—two 5GHz (higher bandwidth w/less range) & one 2.4GHz (longer range w/less bandwidth)—for reliable, efficient, fast home/home office networking. You can enjoy lag-free videoconferencing & fast file transfer in your home office while the family streams 4K or HD media in the living room. You can also connect your PCs, smart TVs, laptops, tablets, & smartphones. The router comes w/8 pre-installed adjustable external antennae, 8 gigabit LAN ports, 1 WAN port, 2 USB ports (2.0 & 3.0), 802.11ac standards, & a generous 3yr warranty w/3yr of tech support. Security includes WPA/WPA2 encryption & SPI firewall. Setup: The setup process was smooth, mainly because we’d previously set up a similar Linksys router. (Our ISP-provided DSL modem/router requires detailed changes to accommodate a separate router; so, be prepared to contact your carrier for assistance if you have this situation.) The unit has a large footprint (13” x 11” & antennae that rise 6” above the shelf it sits on), but it’s very powerful & worth the additional space required. The router includes a status panel w/8 LED bars that flash when the router is booting up or performing a firmware upgrade, & they remain solid when the router is up & running. Interface: The Smart Wi-Fi interface is easy to use. The mobile & web-based app allows remote, albeit basic managing/monitoring from anywhere. The new visual network map provides an at-a-glance image of what’s connected to your network. Guest Access allows you to create a separate PW-protected Wi-Fi network for up to 50 guests. Parental Controls are also included. Connectivity: Beamforming technology focuses the Wi-Fi signal to each device on the network & helps provide stronger signal strength/coverage. The Smart Connect feature is designed w/automatic band steering for load balancing among your connected devices for optimum performance. And the Device Priority feature allows you to tell the router to give priority to streaming content over downloading a large file (w/file transfer speeds already enhanced via the Max-Stream 1.4GHz dual-core processor). Still, the importance of proper configuration can’t be overstated! After using the Wi-Fi analyzer app, optimizing the wireless router settings, tweaking the channels for both frequency bands (after 1st utilizing auto-channel detection), repositioning the antennae to better align w/our networking environment, & ensuring we’d upgraded to the latest firmware—we’re finally experiencing stable/reliable connections (w/o drops or buffering) w/all our devices across all family members (leveraging the MU-MIMO technology). Yep, the router is pushing the signal thru walls & at good distances away, even allowing us to walk around in our back yard while maintaining solid connections, w/the doors/windows closed. (Note: you may need to try setting a fixed channel on both networks to minimize signal interference in your area.) Conclusion: The basic but beefy hardware handles high bandwidths & manages all our home-networked devices simultaneously. Although sophisticated users likely will be disappointed w/the limited configuration & real-time monitoring options, for the avg. family that wants to enjoy all their connected devices, all at once, in multiple rooms, throughout the house, this router gets the job done. The Future: This cutting-edge router may well provide more capability/capacity than you currently need, but it does offer future-proofing as you increase the # of connected devices in your home, as the individual capabilities of your newer devices require greater bandwidth, & as your ISP’s bandwidth to your home/home office improves. However, this future could just as well offer reasons not to ‘overinvest’ in a router at this higher price pt., as several companies have already responded to these home network demands by developing the next iteration/evolution in wireless routers—including the newer ‘mesh’ home networking SYSTEMS that utilize multiple 'nodes'—which are designed to provide even higher connection speeds, greater signal strength, extended range/broader coverage areas, & better signal stability/reliability.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

      Doesn't quite live up to the hype yet

      Posted
      GrizzlyD
      • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      Overview (Firmware 1.1.5.172212) I very recently acquired the Linksys EA9500 Max-Stream AC5400 Tri-Band Wi-Fi Router as a replacement for my Netgear R6300v2 Smart WiFi Router AC1750 Dual Band device. I was quite happy with my Netgear, but an opportunity presented itself to give this new Linksys device a try. First, it should be noted that I am a happy Netgear fan. I’ve used Netgear equipment for years. The last time I owned a Linksys was prior to the Cisco purchase. Back then those devices would fail on me every 365 days like clockwork, and I’d replace it with another Linksys until one day I happened upon Netgear and I’ve been a happy user ever since with nearly zero fails in over a decade of using their products. That being said I decided to go into this with an open mind, especially since I didn’t have to pay the massive $400 price tag for this beast. I’ve been using the device for 4 days now, and here are my findings: Pros • Tri-Band is slick o At first glance you think “oh big deal, it has 3 bands…why would I want to have 3 SSIDs in my household”. Well here is where I was pleasantly surprised. This device has a function called Smart Connect band steering where it essentially automatically moves devices from one 5GHz band or another without any user intervention, all on the same 5GHz SSID. This is fantastic!! However, I’ve yet to realize any real performance advantage to this. Theoretically this should increase performance though. I just don’t believe the average consumer taxes their Wi-Fi enough to realize it. • 8+1 Port Gigabit Switch! o Well it’s about time! I’ve had to use a Smart Switch and Router combo for years because vendors never bothered to put enough wired ports on these things. This saved me an extra power outlet! • 8 External Antennas? o Well in theory this is a major pro, but I’ve not seen the increase in range at all. I have a 3k Sq Ft 2-story home with this device installed in a rack on the second floor and it’s simply performing no different in terms of signal strength to my old Netgear device. Maybe I didn’t aim the antennas right?! At any rate, I expected better, but I’ll go ahead and drop this in a Pro column for now. I mean who doesn’t like 8 antennas? • Smart Wi-Fi interface o It’s pretty basic and easy to use, but the really nice thing about it is the simplistic interface. You can get in and get stuff done. On top of that remote management is a piece of cake with the smart phone app. • Firmware Help menu isn’t useless o This is yet another nod to the Firmware interface. The help isn’t completely useless, and it does a decent job of explaining settings and their purpose. • Auto Channel detection works o Well this is a nice feature! Saves you the time of having to walk around the house with a wireless device doing AirSnort trying to determine who’s doing what on what channel. This device just fires right up and picks the correct channel based on what it sees. Nice one! • Network Map is somewhat handy o The Network Map tool built-in to the Firmware isn’t too bad. I find it helpful to be able to look at a glance at what is connected. Not only that, but you can edit the names to make sense. Child’s Laptop, or Kindle rather than Android%Device#123. Good for simple housekeeping. Cons • Using custom DNS non-functional on DHCP lease o I don’t know about the rest of the world, but I rely on OpenDNS. I find it performs better than that which is provided by my ISP. However, in this version of the firmware I find that I cannot get the DNS addresses I input to stick. When a client gets a DHCP address from the router it simply shows its DNS address as the routers address rather than the 3 OpenDNS addresses I input. WTF?! Interface bug maybe? I dunno but this sucks…Fix it Linksys! ...Fix it now!! • Huge bug in Media Prioritization feature o Well this should have been a selling point. The ability to do QoS for packets on specific devices. Sign me up! I’d love to have my 4K TV, my Shield Tablet, or my Ooma get priority on the line, but nooooooo! What I discovered was that this little feature is 1) very limited. You may only specify 3 devices to get Priorty…Well that sucks!! And 2) Turn this on and it immediately drops the bandwidth of all other devices in the house to 1/3rd of the usual rate. Turn it back off and you’re off to the races! WTH?! This is a silly bug to have made it into production. QoS shouldn’t neuter all other devices in favor of 3 devices...especially if those other devices aren’t even powered on at the time! Huge bug…Fix it now Linksys!! Seriously…Fix this! • Massive size with no wall mount capability o I dunno...I mean 8 Ethernet ports and 8 antennas…I guess it’s going to be slightly bigger than other routers. But dang!! This thing is the size of a small laptop and twice as thick as one. What’s worse?! There’s no wall mount bracket or holes on the back for mounting it. The only option is to sit it on a flat surface. Well that sucks! So right now it’s parked on top of an equipment rack enjoying a cool breeze from the rack fans. This is something I’d like to remedy at some point. I hate blocking my exhaust fans in my rack. • Parental controls are useless o Seriously?! What the heck is this? I can select a device to block Internet access Never, Always, or at Specific Times. Or I can also choose to black list specific sites. Well this is lame. It may not be pretty, but at least Netgear’s parental controls utilize OpenDNS and have some level customization to them. This is rubbish. • App Center is barren wasteland o I really don’t know what the purpose of this is. I mean maybe at some point they expect someone to write a Kodi server app or something so you can host apps on your router using the external storage, but right now it’s completely empty save a couple junk parental control type apps. And those apps only seem to appear from a mobile device using Smart Wi-Fi not within the router itself. • Speed Test doesn’t work o There’s a Speed Test widget built-in to the router Firmware, but I’ve no idea what it does or looks like because it won’t run in Chrome or FireFox. It throws some junk error about installing Adobe Flash 8.0 and let’s be real…I’m not going to do that, and pretty much all modern browsers have Flash APIs built-in. This should just work…Fix it Linksys! • Firewall too basic o For those that pay 400 large for this beast be prepared to be annoyed that you don’t get any finite control of the firewall. It’s either on or off. meh • Logging far too basic o I turned logging on for a few minutes. There were only entries in the about IPs attempting to connect or not. But nothing really about protocol or anything of any real value. So I turned it back off because who wants to waste CPU cycles on useless data. What would be ideal is a log of the sites being accessed externally from a given IP internally or even what protocols or types of attacks are being seen on the external IP. Summary I’d like to think I was pretty fair here. I tried my best to flush out as many Pros as Cons. In summary, this device so far doesn’t provide a whole lot of value add over my trusty old Netgear R6300v2 which sells for $150. Yeah this device has Tri-Band and Smart Connect optimization. I mean that sounds cool, but again I haven’t realized the true value of this. I have over 35 wireless devices on my network and nothing is performing any better or worse really from when I was using the older router. Even with 8 external antennas my signal strength is no better or worse than with my old router?! That’s odd. Of the two biggest wins here 1 is realized and the other is theoretical. 8 LAN ports is just AWESOME!! Tri-Band Smart Connect is cool, but does it really work?! /shrug This device is 400 big ones! It should be spectacular, but I’m left feeling rather underwhelmed. I’ve never spent that kind of money on a consumer grade router, and likely never will. There’s some pretty serious bugs and imperfections in the firmware that need to be sorted out ASAP. If you’re a Linksys brand loyalist and need 8 LAN ports, then why not?! If you’re simply in the market for a new router your wallet might be better served holding out and snatching up a less expensive variant for the time being.

      No, I would not recommend this to a friend

      • Brand response

        Linksys Staff

        Hi, GrizzlyD,

        Thank you for sharing your honest observations with the router's features. This review is very detailed and useful for future updates.

        We understand your point about the OpenDNS setup and the functionalities of the Firewall and Log feature of the router. As for the media prioritization, it's a good idea that the router would allow prioritizing more than three devices. We'll have this shared to the Engineering team as well as the idea to allow the router to be wall-mounted.

        Right now, the Linksys Smart WiFi mobile and web-based app are very helpful to monitor your network anywhere you are. Since there are features that can't be done on the mobile-based app, you can always use a browser to make some adjustments with the settings anytime you want to.

        We also have few workarounds that you can try for the challenges that you've noticed with it. Let's start with improving the range of the wireless network. Adjusting the wireless channel would help and if the same thing happens, we suggest adjusting the antennas. Check out this article, http://www.linksys.com/us/support-article?articleNum=178068. Moving on to the speed test applet, make sure that the about:plugins has the flash enabled in both Firefox or Chrome, and restart the browser.

        Do not hesitate to email us at LinksysCares@linksys.com so we can assist you further and indicate your full name, contact details, and the link to this post in your message.


        Regards,

        Linksys Support Linksys

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Linksys AC5400 Router Is a Server in Disguise

      Posted
      pauldar
      • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member
      • Top 1000 ContributorTop 1000 Contributor

      Was thrilled to receive this complimentary Linksys AC5400, MU-MIMO Gigabit Router, especially, since I was in the process of upgrading my ISP bandwidth and also setting up a small office with VOIP to my existing residential network. The eight Gigabit Ethernet and two USB ports offered me more connections for my office electronics while enabling me to connect all of my home network devices utilizing Tri-Band Wi-Fi, with next generation Wave2, Multi User-MIMO. WooHoo! The Linksys AC5400 Tri-Band Router offers these most important features: Three Wi-Fi bands of 1000Mbps at 2.4Ghz and (2) 2166 Mbps at 5Ghz 1.4Ghz dual core processor Ports – 8 x Gigabit LAN, 1 x Gigabit WAN, 1 x USB 3.0, 1 x USB 2.0 Security – WPA / WPA2 encryption with SPI firewall network protection Beamforming Technology Eight external antennas – adjustable vertically and horizontally WPS button for pairing and Wi-Fi On / Off button and A/C power switch Smart Wi-Fi App, IOS or Android, for mobile, remote access and control Activity lights on top of unit indicating On / Off Three year warranty and three year tech support First, I replaced my old cable modem for one that now provides me 32 X 8 channels, up to 1.4GBps download speeds and 240 Mbps upstream. Next I upgraded all of my existing network cable connections from CAT-5 to CAT- 6. In order to take advantage of my Linksys AC5400 Gigabit Ethernet network upgrading to CAT-6 insured that all of my office devices would not suffer any kind of performance losses if I still used CAT-5. While in this process of upgrading my network I located the Linksys AC5400 in a bedroom, now converted into my office, near the center of the house. The old router was located near the entertainment devices. So now, it was extremely important for me to receive the strongest Wi-Fi signals possible from my new Linksys AC5400 router. After setting-up my office devices in the converted bedroom it was time to configure my Linksys AC5400 Router. Although setting-up this router is simple, I would suggest you take additional time to go through all of the feature-packed settings to get the optimum out of this router. I followed the instructions in the Linksys 'Quick Start Guide', which is included in the packaging with the main unit. Again, it was simple and easy to configure this router by connecting to the Linksys web-based, set-up. You can establish your 'Smart Wi-Fi Account' and create a secure password for remote connectivity and control at this time. I named the 2.4 and 5.0 Ghz networks, separately, and enabled the 'guest access'. I went on to configure my network's security and firewall. I used the WPA2, which for now, is the most secure. After enabling the firewall I tested the router's firewall configuration using GRC's Shield UP!. It tested 'secure'. You can assign up to 155 IP addresses, by default 50 are designated. I changed my setting to100 for now. I used the VLAN to connect my VOIP home service without a hitch. YooHoo! After prioritizing several of my media devices to 'high priority' and the rest to 'normal' I logged each device into the network of my choosing. High priority for me is the living room smart tv, because we stream internet movies and programs routinely. The game room is next because the Grand kids are playing purchased and on-line games over the net. Some of my devices are legacy and would only log into the 2.4 Ghz network, Several I had to pair with the WPS button on the side of the AC5400 router. Under the 'Wireless' setting in the web-based configuration you are furnished a router pin to use with WPS pairing if your device asks for one. My home office includes five connected devices: MAC desktop computer; MS desktop computer; external hard drive storage, connected to the USB 3 port; laser printer connected to the USB 2 port; and VOIP phone. My Wi-Fi home network serves eighteen devices: three smart TV's; two streaming devices; an I-Pad; two I-Phones; an Android phone; two tablets; two laptops; Wi-Fi speaker; all-in-one printer; Wi-Fi home security system; Wi-Fi thermostat; and a Wi-Fi sewing machine, which is displayed as a 'hidden network'. It took about an hour to log-on all these devices to the network, 2.4 or 5 Ghz, that I chose for each. However, most of these devices are on the 5. Ghz networks. After a month of using all of my devices, and, especially working in my new home office, I am super-pleased with the range, speed, and features of this Linksys AC5400 router. I do not have any deadspots, and, amazed that this router can handle all of my devices simultaneously with great speed. At this time I am not able to take advantage of the MU-MIMO capability since none of my devices have that feature. But, I am eagerly looking forward to this Fall when many new devices will be introduced with MU-MIMO capablility. This router sort of 'future-proofs' your home network for many years. One of my older laptops, which is dual band Wi-Fi, may be a prime candidate for the MU-MIMO USB adapter. I will be looking into that since it is available at my local Best Buy, and, I would love to see how effective this technology actually is. Looking forward to review this Linksys MU-MIMO USB adapter soon. In the last month of operation using this router my home network has been transformed into one dynamic server with great range and speed. I can go outside with any of my mobile devices: the phones, tablets, or I-Pad and still be connected for approximately 250 feet on 5 Ghz before it drop to 2.4 Ghz. I am super-impressed with the features of this router, which allows all of my devices, whether in the office or elsewhere in my home, to share, transfer photos, files, or, any other content without being directly connected by cable. It even allows the connected printer to be shared also. If you have a large house or area to serve, and, or, many devices, and, or, setting-up a home office to your network as I did. Please consider the Linksys AC 5400 Tri-Band MU-MIMO Router. It is pricey, but, you get what you pay for, that is, if you want the 'best', most powerful, and 'future-proofed' router available. I highly recommend it.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    What experts are saying

    Rating: 4 out of 5 stars with 2 reviews

    Click to visit alaTest website
    The analysis of all aggregated expert reviews shows that the reviewers are positive about reliability, size and usability. Editors are less positive about price.
    • Hardware Canucks (UK)AkG on December 19, 2016
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      As we recently stated in the TP-Link Archer C3150 review , the home networking marketplace is in the midst of what is best described as a 'MegahertzFull Review
    • Tech Advisor (UK)Rating, 4 out of 5Benny Har-Even on August 10, 2016
      Linksys EA9500 review
      With eight Gigabit ports, eight antennae and three Wi-Fi bands this crazy-looking router wants to take all the internets you can throw at it and eat them for breakfast. How does it do? Read our Linksys EA9500 review to find out.Full Review



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