Logan [DVD] [2017]

$7.99
Save $7
Was $14.99

Item Added.View List

Add to List

    No lists found. Create one today.
    Add Item
    Cardmember Offers
    Frequently bought together
    Subtotal:

    Overview

    Ratings & Reviews


    Overall Customer Rating:
    98% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (8606 out of 8844)

    Synopsis


    Logan
    In a hideout near the U.S./Mexico border, an aging Logan (Hugh Jackman) cares for the ailing Professor X (Patrick Stewart). However, their sheltered existence comes to a sudden end when a young mutant girl (Dafne Keen) arrives and needs their help to stay safe. James Mangold directed this film, the third Wolverine-based spin-off of the X-Men franchise. ~ Daniel Gelb, Rovi

    Cast & Crew


    • Hugh Jackman
      Hugh Jackman - Logan
    • Patrick Stewart
      Patrick Stewart - Charles Xavier / Professor X
    • Boyd Holbrook
      Boyd Holbrook - Pierce
    • Stephen Merchant
      Stephen Merchant - Caliban
    • Dafne Keen
      Dafne Keen - Laura



    Customer rating

    4.7
    98%
    would recommend to a friend
    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Great Film

      Posted
      cchiatt
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

      Directed by James Mangold (The Wolverine, Walk the Line) from a screenplay by Mangold, Scott Frank (The Wolverine, Get Shorty) and (Heroes, American Gods), Logan is a finely crafted movie with a moving script and excellent performances that bring the Hugh Jackman Wolverine story-arc to a fitting conclusion. The story is set in a not-too-distant future of 2029, but it's a world that's changed dramatically for mutants in general and for James "Logan" Howlett (Hugh Jackman in truly top form), who no longer goes by Wolverine, and Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart in arguably his best performance in the role), who's no longer a professor anywhere. The intervening years have not been kind to either man. Logan's healing factor is failing, his body having apparently been slowly poisoned over time by the adamantium fused into his skeleton as part of the Weapon X program. Xavier, who's now in his 90's, is physically frail but also suffers from advancing neurological degeneration and seizures which must be suppressed medically to avoid devastating telepathic eruptions that can lay out anyone who happens to be in the vicinity. With assistance from fellow mutant Caliban (Stephen Merchant), Logan looks after Charles, holed up in an abandoned factory near the Texas/Mexico border where he works as a limo driver for rich tourists. Logan, Xavier and Caliban are seemingly among the last mutants around. For some reason, no new mutants have been born in the last twenty-five years. Or so it would seem until they encounter an 11-year-old girl named Laura (Dafne Keen who definitely holds her own in scenes with Jackman and Stewart), of whom Xavier tells Logan "She's like you... very much like you." The good thing about the screenplay is that you don't need more than a basic familiarity with the main characters - Jackman's Wolverine and Patrick Stewart's Professor X - to follow what's going on. One of the best things about Logan as a film, which helps make it arguably the best film of the X-Men/Wolverine series, is due to the excellent screenplay that allows both Jackman and Stewart to really flex their considerable acting talents and bring new depth and perspectives to their roles as Logan and Xavier, characters for whom the world has vastly changed and not in good ways. As is already hinted at in the trailers, Logan's healing factor is failing him as is Xavier's health and mind. The end of the road is all too visible for both men and both have to face their personal doubts and fears in ways they never had to before. As a result, Jackman and Stewart give the best performances of their characters to date, not to mention some of the best performances of their careers. It is a credit to young Dafne Keen that she can hold her own in her scenes with these two veterans as well as the scenes where she's on her own. The musical score by Marco Beltrami (The Wolverine, The Hurt Locker) is suitably atmospheric, suggesting a worn-down weariness in some scenes but jumping into an edgy adrenaline-rush feeling in others, but always in the background, never over-powering or distracting from what's happening on the screen. Highly, highly recommended for anyone who's ever been a fan of superhero movies in general, of the X-men series in particular, or of just great story-telling and moving performances by a great cast.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      "So, this is what it feels like."

      Posted
      kenn
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember
      • Top 1000 ContributorTop 1000 Contributor

      Directed by James Mangold (The Wolverine, Walk the Line) from a screenplay by Mangold, Scott Frank (The Wolverine, Get Shorty) and (Heroes, American Gods), Logan is a finely crafted movie with a moving script and excellent performances that bring the Hugh Jackman Wolverine story-arc to a fitting conclusion. The story is set in a not-too-distant future of 2029, but it's a world that's changed dramatically for mutants in general and for James "Logan" Howlett (Hugh Jackman in truly top form), who no longer goes by Wolverine, and Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart in arguably his best performance in the role), who's no longer a professor anywhere. The intervening years have not been kind to either man. Logan's healing factor is failing, his body having apparently been slowly poisoned over time by the adamantium fused into his skeleton as part of the Weapon X program. Xavier, who's now in his 90's, is physically frail but also suffers from advancing neurological degeneration and seizures which must be suppressed medically to avoid devastating telepathic eruptions that can lay out anyone who happens to be in the vicinity. With assistance from fellow mutant Caliban (Stephen Merchant), Logan looks after Charles, holed up in an abandoned factory near the Texas/Mexico border where he works as a limo driver for rich tourists. Logan, Xavier and Caliban are seemingly among the last mutants around. For some reason, no new mutants have been born in the last twenty-five years. Or so it would seem until they encounter an 11-year-old girl named Laura (Dafne Keen who definitely holds her own in scenes with Jackman and Stewart), of whom Xavier tells Logan "She's like you... very much like you." The good thing about the screenplay is that you don't need more than a basic familiarity with the main characters - Jackman's Wolverine and Patrick Stewart's Professor X - to follow what's going on. One of the best things about Logan as a film, which helps make it arguably the best film of the X-Men/Wolverine series, is due to the excellent screenplay that allows both Jackman and Stewart to really flex their considerable acting talents and bring new depth and perspectives to their roles as Logan and Xavier, characters for whom the world has vastly changed and not in good ways. As is already hinted at in the trailers, Logan's healing factor is failing him as is Xavier's health and mind. The end of the road is all too visible for both men and both have to face their personal doubts and fears in ways they never had to before. As a result, Jackman and Stewart give the best performances of their characters to date, not to mention some of the best performances of their careers. It is a credit to young Dafne Keen that she can hold her own in her scenes with these two veterans as well as the scenes where she's on her own. The musical score by Marco Beltrami (The Wolverine, The Hurt Locker) is suitably atmospheric, suggesting a worn-down weariness in some scenes but jumping into an edgy adrenaline-rush feeling in others, but always in the background, never over-powering or distracting from what's happening on the screen. Highly, highly recommended for anyone who's ever been a fan of superhero movies in general, of the X-men series in particular, or of just great story-telling and moving performances by a great cast.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      The perfect swan song for Logan

      Posted
      Wizard
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

      Directed by James Mangold (The Wolverine, Walk the Line) from a screenplay by Mangold, Scott Frank (The Wolverine, Get Shorty) and (Heroes, American Gods), Logan is a finely crafted movie with a moving script and excellent performances that bring the Hugh Jackman Wolverine story-arc to a fitting conclusion. The story is set in a not-too-distant future of 2029, but it's a world that's changed dramatically for mutants in general and for James "Logan" Howlett (Hugh Jackman in truly top form), who no longer goes by Wolverine, and Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart in arguably his best performance in the role), who's no longer a professor anywhere. The intervening years have not been kind to either man. Logan's healing factor is failing, his body having apparently been slowly poisoned over time by the adamantium fused into his skeleton as part of the Weapon X program. Xavier, who's now in his 90's, is physically frail but also suffers from advancing neurological degeneration and seizures which must be suppressed medically to avoid devastating telepathic eruptions that can lay out anyone who happens to be in the vicinity. With assistance from fellow mutant Caliban (Stephen Merchant), Logan looks after Charles, holed up in an abandoned factory near the Texas/Mexico border where he works as a limo driver for rich tourists. Logan, Xavier and Caliban are seemingly among the last mutants around. For some reason, no new mutants have been born in the last twenty-five years. Or so it would seem until they encounter an 11-year-old girl named Laura (Dafne Keen who definitely holds her own in scenes with Jackman and Stewart), of whom Xavier tells Logan "She's like you... very much like you." The good thing about the screenplay is that you don't need more than a basic familiarity with the main characters - Jackman's Wolverine and Patrick Stewart's Professor X - to follow what's going on. One of the best things about Logan as a film, which helps make it arguably the best film of the X-Men/Wolverine series, is due to the excellent screenplay that allows both Jackman and Stewart to really flex their considerable acting talents and bring new depth and perspectives to their roles as Logan and Xavier, characters for whom the world has vastly changed and not in good ways. As is already hinted at in the trailers, Logan's healing factor is failing him as is Xavier's health and mind. The end of the road is all too visible for both men and both have to face their personal doubts and fears in ways they never had to before. As a result, Jackman and Stewart give the best performances of their characters to date, not to mention some of the best performances of their careers. It is a credit to young Dafne Keen that she can hold her own in her scenes with these two veterans as well as the scenes where she's on her own. The musical score by Marco Beltrami (The Wolverine, The Hurt Locker) is suitably atmospheric, suggesting a worn-down weariness in some scenes but jumping into an edgy adrenaline-rush feeling in others, but always in the background, never over-powering or distracting from what's happening on the screen. Highly, highly recommended for anyone who's ever been a fan of superhero movies in general, of the X-men series in particular, or of just great story-telling and moving performances by a great cast.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      One Last Time...

      Posted
      AppleMom
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      Wolverine, one of the greatest heroes of all time, has been through a lot. After making his debut in The Incredible Hulk #181, he went to the pages of the X-Men, and then to the big screen when Hugh Jackman picked up the claws to add the classic Logan to the X-Men's movie roster. So it came as no surprise that he would get some movies of his own. The only problem is, they didn't work all the time. X-Men Origins: Wolverine ultimately butchered the iconic origins of the character (and Deadpool) with a sloppy story and poor CGI. The Wolverine was certainly an improvement, but it still had its issues in that it was being held back by a PG-13 rating. So, when the news that Hugh Jackman decided to step down from the role, the heads at 20th Century Fox wanted him to go out on top, and boy did they make that happen. Logan is by far one of the greatest X-Men films, and one of the greatest superhero films of all time, coming close to the legends that are The Dark Knight and Spider-Man 2, but unlike those two films, it pushes all the boundaries it can while still delivering a superhero/noir film. The story may seem pretty basic, but holds a hardcore look unlike any the world has ever seen. In the future, did Logan's actions save the X-Men from the horror of a Sentinel ruled world? Briefly, for now the world is a barren waste, and the X-Men are gone, killed by the ailing Charles Xavier's own troublesome telepathic powers. Logan now watches him on a hideout along the Mexican border, trying to hide from the world. But when a small girl shows up, Logan's life is changed as he tries to take her to a hiding place, ultimately discovering himself along the way. Sounds basic enough right? Well, it would be, if that story didn't include some of the most gritty, gory action scenes ever seen in cinema history. This time, Wolverine doesn't hold back whatsoever. He swears, he lets the claws fly out, and he doesn't show any mercy whatsoever. But this isn't the humorous type of violence like Deadpool, rather, it's the kind you'd see in classic noir films, as evidenced by the tone. None of his enemies stand a chance; even an 11 year old girl with his powers proves to be just as brutal as he is. Speaking of which, this is the best performances from Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart I've ever seen. The former is finally allowed to be the broken, confused, yet strong and brutal character he was meant to play since the beginning, while the later plays off of the vulnerable, yet optimistic leader of the X-Men, now holding the loss of the X-Men forever within the confines of his failing mind. But the true star of the show is Daphne Keen as X-23, Wolverine's young clone, who plays off the character like a professional Oscar Winning actress; hard, brutal, yet vulnerable. Overall, if you want to see Hugh Jackman sheath out the claws one last time, then this is the movie to see, in both color and black and white.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Great movie!

      Posted
      Morach
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

      Directed by James Mangold (The Wolverine, Walk the Line) from a screenplay by Mangold, Scott Frank (The Wolverine, Get Shorty) and (Heroes, American Gods), Logan is a finely crafted movie with a moving script and excellent performances that bring the Hugh Jackman Wolverine story-arc to a fitting conclusion. The story is set in a not-too-distant future of 2029, but it's a world that's changed dramatically for mutants in general and for James "Logan" Howlett (Hugh Jackman in truly top form), who no longer goes by Wolverine, and Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart in arguably his best performance in the role), who's no longer a professor anywhere. The intervening years have not been kind to either man. Logan's healing factor is failing, his body having apparently been slowly poisoned over time by the adamantium fused into his skeleton as part of the Weapon X program. Xavier, who's now in his 90's, is physically frail but also suffers from advancing neurological degeneration and seizures which must be suppressed medically to avoid devastating telepathic eruptions that can lay out anyone who happens to be in the vicinity. With assistance from fellow mutant Caliban (Stephen Merchant), Logan looks after Charles, holed up in an abandoned factory near the Texas/Mexico border where he works as a limo driver for rich tourists. The good thing about the screenplay is that you don't need more than a basic familiarity with the main characters - Jackman's Wolverine and Patrick Stewart's Professor X - to follow what's going on. One of the best things about Logan as a film, which helps make it arguably the best film of the X-Men/Wolverine series, is due to the excellent screenplay that allows both Jackman and Stewart to really flex their considerable acting talents and bring new depth and perspectives to their roles as Logan and Xavier, characters for whom the world has vastly changed and not in good ways. As is already hinted at in the trailers, Logan's healing factor is failing him as is Xavier's health and mind. The end of the road is all too visible for both men and both have to face their personal doubts and fears in ways they never had to before. As a result, Jackman and Stewart give the best performances of their characters to date, not to mention some of the best performances of their careers. It is a credit to young Dafne Keen that she can hold her own in her scenes with these two veterans as well as the scenes where she's on her own. The musical score by Marco Beltrami (The Wolverine, The Hurt Locker) is suitably atmospheric, suggesting a worn-down weariness in some scenes but jumping into an edgy adrenaline-rush feeling in others, but always in the background, never over-powering or distracting from what's happening on the screen. Highly, highly recommended for anyone who's ever been a fan of superhero movies in general, of the X-men series in particular, or of just great story-telling and moving performances by a great cast.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      The End of an Era

      Posted
      VandyPrice
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member
      • Top 1000 ContributorTop 1000 Contributor

      It's disappointing. Tragic, even. All those struggles and all that time invested in trying to make the world a better place and this is what they have to show for it. This is what it's all come to. There is a sweeping sorrow to Hugh Jackman's swan song as The Wolverine, but much like its brutal, bloody, and exceptionally R-rated violence, this tone feels justified and necessary. Necessary not only in the aesthetic sense of what is befitting to Logan's world, but necessary in that tragedy always was the way of the world for Logan AKA James Howlett, so why might his conclusion be spared such tribulations? Fortunately for us, but unfortunately for our titular mutant LOGAN is another tale in which our protagonist is pulled into a conflict in which he bears no responsibility in creating, but that his storied past has somehow served as an influence and thus he is then unwillingly pulled into the scenario. This time things are different though, as before and in the many movies we've seen Jackman portray Wolverine the character has always been reluctant, but ultimately unable to deny his true and selfless heroism. He couldn't help but to care, couldn't help but to stand up for the little guy and what he felt to be right, but in LOGAN Wolverine is a much more broken man than we've ever seen him before. His extended past is beginning to catch up with him and we can see that he's tired of playing this role, he's tired of being the hero, of feeling the responsibility to save the day and that he's essentially forcing himself to not care any longer, but rather focus on the task at hand-a task that sees putting himself and an old friend first. In the midst of all this is the centerpiece that is Jackman's final turn as the adamantium clawed mutant making this grief and misery and pain all the more palpable. Jackman so embodies the character at this point though, it's hard to imagine he has a hard time slipping into even the worn and weathered skin of his alter ego at this stage in the game. And while it is Jackman's (presumably) final turn in his most iconic role that is rightly at the center of what makes LOGAN so emotionally rich and narratively compelling there is plenty going on around him that builds the film up in these ways and make it a genuinely thrilling end of an era.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Gritty but Great Chapter to the X-Men Franchise

      Posted
      CCMovieGirl
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

      The X-Men movies, like the comics on which they are based, have often dealt with themes of oppression and discrimination, frequently from the point of view of young mutants (who are dealing with coming of age while facing these larger issues). Although this film includes young cast members, it was interesting to see most of the storyline through Logan's older and worn down perspective. His struggles aren't about young love or petty rivalries; his struggles are about whether he should just end his struggles. Logan--a fighter for decades--is looking for a way to end the fight. You can clearly see the tiredness and brokenness of the character in Hugh Jackman's tragic and moving performance. Despite the grim circumstances faced by this character, Jackman's portrayal reminds the viewer why you still root for him. Buried beneath his hardships, he is still the Wolverine. He still goes back into the fight even when there's no hope for him, even when there's a newer, stronger model ready to kill him. He still faces the fight. As he said in the first X-Men film, it may hurt "every time," but he still takes on that hurt. This film made me cry. It was dark and brutal, but it was also very similar to the western Shane, to which it often made reference. You root for the hero even when he doesn't want to be the hero anymore. The character may just be Logan, no longer wearing any costumes, but that doesn't change how he acts when someone needs his help. This movie is a must-see for any fan of Wolverine, although I would caution that this is nowhere near as campy or light-hearted as other superhero films. As for the blu-ray itself, the digital copy includes an iTunes file. If you're looking to expand your Apple movie library, this blu-ray will work for you.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      A product to embrace the end of an era

      Posted
      Raigetsu
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      "Logan" is the final film of the titular character Wolverine, played by Hugh Jackman since 2001. The character who could take a bomb blast, a bullet to the head and get his metallic bones pulled apart and still walk away lives in a future where all the heroes we've come to know since 2001's "X-Men" are all gone, with Wolverine himself dying of a failing healing factor due to a mutant virus, mixed with his body over compensating from perpetually healing him due to his metal exoskeleton. The steelbook is a great way to send off the character in his final film as it includes the bluray, DVD, digital copy and a black and white "Noir" edition of the video. The movie, unlike previous X-Men/Wolverine films, is full of cursing and an abundance of violence that would make Deadpool blush a color of red deeper than his costume. Needless to say, this is not a film kids should watch. The noir edition, for me, is somewhat of a miss. The "noir edition" is what it is, a black and white version. And while that sounds cool, it lacks any kind of special effect or grain to make it look like it's intended idea. Having watched the original version several times (In theater and on bluray), the noir version offers nothing that the colored version does not. If they wanted to make it pop, they could have gone the "Sin City" route and keep the blood (and trust me, there's plenty of it) red to make it stand out from the black and white copy. My only other gripe is the somewhat comical drawing on the cover of Dafne Keen (X-23) on the cover. But for the price, the features, and the great sendoff (You can not watch this film's climax and not say to yourself "What a song to end it all" during the credits). A recommended buy. Even if the Steelbook is a bit rich for your taste, the standard bluray edition is a guaranteed win. The DVD, for me, doesn't do it enough justice.

      I would recommend this to a friend



    Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.