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Lucy [DVD] [2014]

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    Overview

    Ratings & Reviews


    Overall Customer Rating:
    91% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (2425 out of 2677)

    Synopsis


    Lucy
    Morgan Freeman and Scarlett Johansson headline this EuropaCorp/TF1 Films co-production directed by Luc Besson, and released by Universal Pictures. The story centers on a woman (Johansson) who falls prey to sinister underworld forces, but who gains superhuman abilities that allow her to strike back at her oppressors. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

    Cast & Crew


    • Scarlett Johansson
      Scarlett Johansson - Lucy
    • Morgan Freeman
      Morgan Freeman - Professor Norman
    • Choi Min-Sik
      Choi Min-Sik - Mr. Jang
    • Amr Waked
      Amr Waked - Pierre Del Rio
    • Julian Rhind-Tutt
      Julian Rhind-Tutt - The Limey



    Customer rating

    Rating 4.3 out of 5 stars with 2677 reviews

    91%
    would recommend to a friend

    Most relevant reviews

    See all customer reviews
    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Lucy ( Scarlett Johansson )

      Posted
      Tommy
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      Luc Besson’s “Lucy” is a startling and thought-provoking exercise in What-If science fiction, masquerading as a summer action blockbuster. Despite some maddening flaws, it presents a powerful and compelling vision of what evolution, enlightenment, and eventual human ascension might look like. The story revolves around Lucy, a ditzy 20-something blond party girl living the high life in Taipei, played by Scarlett Johansson. She becomes an accidental drug mule for some really scary bad guys who load up her abdomen with a new, super-duper synthetic party drug she must transport out of the country. Thanks to more really scary post-surgery bad guys, the drug starts leaking into Lucy’s gut, launching a chain of biochemical events that gradually turn on Lucy’s brain capacity to the 100% mark over the course of the film. Morgan Freeman plays the eminent brain researcher/Greek Chorus who helps Lucy, explains all the high-tech stuff to the rest of us, and dodges bullets when Lucy supernaturally conquers the bad guys who come to get their drug back. News Flash: The bad guys can’t touch her. At all. The film has several strong points. Besson is a great proficient in high visual style as seen in his earlier films “The 5th Element” and “la Femme Nikita”. The look of the film is beautiful, and it’s all very well paced. Besson and his writers knew enough to not let either the action scenes or the more serious stuff fall into cliché. Animation wonderfully evokes, among other things, the life processes in our cells, passing through black holes, and also allows us to meet the original 3.2 million year old “Lucy”, the first near-modern primate ever discovered in the fossil record. Viewers are naturally much more interested in the modern Lucy, and the film does not disappoint on that score. Scarlett Johansson does a superb job of being lofty, otherworldly, poignant, and a bombshell in a little black Chanel dress and 6-inch Christian Louboutin heels. The French filmmakers thought, somehow, that if you’re going to evolve and ascend, you should dress well enough to get through the metaphysical door. In the hands of a lesser actress, this would come off as either really campy or patronizing. Gifted actress that she is, Johansson brings a solemn nobility and innocent fascination to her character that is impossible to laugh at. She manages to maintain her dignity while fighting bad guys with really big guns, and driving insanely against one-way traffic in Paris, all the while obviously preoccupied with much larger, more interesting things than what those silly people are doing around her. Morgan Freeman is an excellent foil, bringing warmth and credibility to a part that amounts to reading a neurology textbook out loud. He carries it all off with complete artistic conviction. This reviewer is most grateful that, despite the summer action movie packaging, the “message” is surprisingly high-toned. The small details and moments in the film show this to best advantage. As her plane lands in Paris, Lucy raises a glass of very good champagne to thin air and toasts,”To Knowledge!” It’s a small but telling moment. This is how Lucy will proceed with her evolution. The old adage remains true for many people that ultimate power corrupts absolutely. Just not here, and not with Lucy. She’s going to arrive at enlightenment in the best way possible. Many plot points in the movie support this upward path. A few things tend to water down the message, however. First, the film is way too short at 1 hour 28 minutes. The most interesting points of the philosophical discussion get glossed over, or left hanging. For example, in the middle of the death-dealing demolition derby car chase in Paris, Lucy turns to her anxious policeman sidekick and reassures him with “We never really die”, while avoiding a lethal crash is if by mere chance. Now, it would have been quite interesting if Lucy could have discussed the after-life a bit more, since it seems like she actually knows something about it. Besson must have decided most unfortunately that the car chase had to come first. Interesting and even mind-blowing points are maddeningly rushed over in this way. Also, much of the 1st act exposition is handled like a comic or graphic novel, and so the 1st act plot is overly compressed. Thus, much of the character development ends up a little shallow. It would have helped, for one thing, to see Lucy as she had been in a bit more detail before undergoing her drug-induced brain explosion. As it is, it’s hard to tell if she changes much, or not at all. 10 or 20 more screen minutes would have solved both these problems easily and not burdened the film at all. But having said that, the film succeeds in posing a lot of mind-blowing questions in a visceral and arresting way. Is this what enlightenment really is? Is this where evolution is actually taking us? All those big questions and high-toned ethics, plus a bunch of guns and a little black dress, tied up in a summer action flick. Who knew? Help other customers find the most helpful reviews Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse | Permalink

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Big Ideas, a Whole Bunch of Guns, and a little Bla

      Posted
      Ctron84
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      Luc Besson’s “Lucy” is a startling and thought-provoking exercise in What-If science fiction, masquerading as a summer action blockbuster. Despite some maddening flaws, it presents a powerful and compelling vision of what evolution, enlightenment, and eventual human ascension might look like. The story revolves around Lucy, a ditzy 20-something blond party girl living the high life in Taipei, played by Scarlett Johansson. She becomes an accidental drug mule for some really scary bad guys who load up her abdomen with a new, super-duper synthetic party drug she must transport out of the country. Thanks to more really scary post-surgery bad guys, the drug starts leaking into Lucy’s gut, launching a chain of biochemical events that gradually turn on Lucy’s brain capacity to the 100% mark over the course of the film. Morgan Freeman plays the eminent brain researcher/Greek Chorus who helps Lucy, explains all the high-tech stuff to the rest of us, and dodges bullets when Lucy supernaturally conquers the bad guys who come to get their drug back. News Flash: The bad guys can’t touch her. At all. The film has several strong points. Besson is a great proficient in high visual style as seen in his earlier films “The 5th Element” and “la Femme Nikita”. The look of the film is beautiful, and it’s all very well paced. Besson and his writers knew enough to not let either the action scenes or the more serious stuff fall into cliché. Animation wonderfully evokes, among other things, the life processes in our cells, passing through black holes, and also allows us to meet the original 3.2 million year old “Lucy”, the first near-modern primate ever discovered in the fossil record. Viewers are naturally much more interested in the modern Lucy, and the film does not disappoint on that score. Scarlett Johansson does a superb job of being lofty, otherworldly, poignant, and a bombshell in a little black Chanel dress and 6-inch Christian Louboutin heels. The French filmmakers thought, somehow, that if you’re going to evolve and ascend, you should dress well enough to get through the metaphysical door. In the hands of a lesser actress, this would come off as either really campy or patronizing. Gifted actress that she is, Johansson brings a solemn nobility and innocent fascination to her character that is impossible to laugh at. She manages to maintain her dignity while fighting bad guys with really big guns, and driving insanely against one-way traffic in Paris, all the while obviously preoccupied with much larger, more interesting things than what those silly people are doing around her. Morgan Freeman is an excellent foil, bringing warmth and credibility to a part that amounts to reading a neurology textbook out loud. He carries it all off with complete artistic conviction. This reviewer is most grateful that, despite the summer action movie packaging, the “message” is surprisingly high-toned. The small details and moments in the film show this to best advantage. As her plane lands in Paris, Lucy raises a glass of very good champagne to thin air and toasts,”To Knowledge!” It’s a small but telling moment. This is how Lucy will proceed with her evolution. The old adage remains true for many people that ultimate power corrupts absolutely. Just not here, and not with Lucy. She’s going to arrive at enlightenment in the best way possible. Many plot points in the movie support this upward path. A few things tend to water down the message, however. First, the film is way too short at 1 hour 28 minutes. The most interesting points of the philosophical discussion get glossed over, or left hanging. For example, in the middle of the death-dealing demolition derby car chase in Paris, Lucy turns to her anxious policeman sidekick and reassures him with “We never really die”, while avoiding a lethal crash is if by mere chance. Now, it would have been quite interesting if Lucy could have discussed the after-life a bit more, since it seems like she actually knows something about it. Besson must have decided most unfortunately that the car chase had to come first. Interesting and even mind-blowing points are maddeningly rushed over in this way. Also, much of the 1st act exposition is handled like a comic or graphic novel, and so the 1st act plot is overly compressed. Thus, much of the character development ends up a little shallow. It would have helped, for one thing, to see Lucy as she had been in a bit more detail before undergoing her drug-induced brain explosion. As it is, it’s hard to tell if she changes much, or not at all. 10 or 20 more screen minutes would have solved both these problems easily and not burdened the film at all. But having said that, the film succeeds in posing a lot of mind-blowing questions in a visceral and arresting way. Is this what enlightenment really is? Is this where evolution is actually taking us? All those big questions and high-toned ethics, plus a bunch of guns and a little black dress, tied up in a summer action flick. Who knew?

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

      Same disc and case, better slipcover.

      Posted
      ArmchairQuarterback
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      This is the exact same release that every other vendor is selling. The only thing that makes it stand out is a much nicer slipcover, with a lenticular 3D faceplate. As much as I like slipcovers, I wouldn't pay even a buck more for an exclusive slip. Fortunately, BB usually has the price to beat the week of release anyway, so I didn't have to, and unlike some of their steelbooks and exclusive editions with added trinkets, I haven't seen them charge a premium just for including a different o-sleeve. As for the movie, that's more, if not completely subjective. IMO, Besson still hasn't returned to form. Leon, The Big Blue, The Fifth Element, this is not. But I enjoyed the ride and the message. And there's currently no better experience or home video investment than Blu-ray. Like most Universal releases, a separate dvd and UV/iTunes compatible dcopy voucher are included as well. I personally don't mind the unnecessary swag - even if the dcopy is a rather obvious manipulation to grow that market, and even though the dvd seems rather pointless for this type of film - but it would be nice if studios would at least stop mucking up their cover artwork with unsightly banner advertising and relegate mention of such superfluous inclusions to removable stickers or to the rear of the package itself. Just saying: unlike Ultraviolet/iTunes, discs are a collectible investment. I'd rather not see advertising or cheap marketing on the cover. The slip at least minimizes it to the standard blue banner at the top. But said banner still detracts from the overall aesthetic of the cover design.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Rollercoaster of a sci-fy ride

      Posted
      Kenn
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

      What's not to like?? Sexy Scarlett Johansson, transforming her intellectual potential into real powers of mind over matter as more and more of her brain matter is brought to full awareness and full utilization from exposure to a fetal developmental hormone. It's a wild ride, as Lucy grows quickly into a kind of supernerd with super mental capabilities, but with a caveat that forces her to align her efforts with the most critical thinking minds of scientific investigation. There's a lot, I mean a LOT, of gun-wielding violence as Lucy struggles to evade the attacks on her for purely business reasons at first, and then ultimately for personal as well as business motivations. If you enjoy sci-fi that is imaginable but unlikely, this will overflow your cup. There's also some really great comic lines intertwined with the outrageous adventure scenes, and one finds that the flic satisfies on many levels.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

      A VERY interesting take on "what if" we could....

      Posted
      therobbie15
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      I'm very biased, given that I am a HUGE fan of the director, going to back to his first film, Subway (which wasn't very good, lol). Luc Besson has a style all his own and that in combination with his FAV music guy, Eric Serra has each time produced what I feel is cinematic magic. He has done that again with Lucy. Telling the tale of just "what if we COULD utilize more than the 10-15% of our brain capacity" Lucy take you on a very mental HIGH, slowly examining the potential skills one "could" master once you have THIS Level of power. Eventually, once reaching 100%, you are taken to a place where you not only see the origins of man but the inception of the universe. Fascinating Stuff. Yea, I have to admit, a bit of it quite far fetched BUT that what imagination is: the ability to go FAR beyond what we are currently capable of. To dream of something bigger. You also can't help but notice Luc's ever clever way of filming and framing of a shot. SO MANY shots in Lucy are reminiscent of La Femme Nikita or The Professional. For me, it's a treat to see someone utilize every aspect of filmmaking he can to achieve such visual "eye candy". I LOVEIT! Lucy does this with TOTAL spades! THANKS Luc!

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

      sci-fi absurdity at its best

      Posted
      GreaterThanDiNozzo
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

      The basic premise of the film is fundamentally flawed, being based on a misconception about how the human mind works. Just because humans use x% of their brain doesn't mean utilizing all of it would give us superhuman abilities (see also Limitless, another fun goofy movie). Nonsense aside, Luc Besson generally makes entertaining movies and Scarlett Johansson is insanely charismatic and has proven adept at these sci-fi movies roles (the brilliant slow-burn Under the Skin, the voice of a sentient OS in Her, the much less impressive Ghost in the Shell adaptation, and of course her Black Widow character in the Marvel movies) and she doesn't disappoint here. Cult favorite Korean actor Choi Min-sik (Oldboy, I Saw the Devil, The Quiet Family, Chihwaseon) is another good casting choice. The climax of the film gets increasingly ridiculous, but its still a lot of fun.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Lucy is a sci-fi/action with lots of violence

      Posted
      HawaiianUkulelePlayer
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      Scientists have already pointed out that the idea that humans use only 10 percent of the brain is a myth, but that shouldn't detract from the fun of Luc Besson's terrific LUCY. It's a movie that manages to be thoughtful and exciting at the same time. Smarter than Transcendence and more exhilarating than Limitless, Lucy showcases Besson's skill and enthusiasm. His wide frame is filled with colorful cityscapes and a dazzling array of information and input. His jokey little documentary flashbacks broaden the scope, and he crafts slick, clear, superior action sequences. Yet the movie hinges on Johannson's potent, searching performance, constantly recording the information around her. Her process, moving from struggle to awareness, is highly appealing. (When she pauses to phone her mom, her need is fully apparent.) Then, after all the fighting is done, Lucy leaves mankind with a message of hope. It may be a silly, pulpy "B" movie, but it's a good one.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      LUCY IS A MUST SEE!!!

      Posted
      gusvelasco94
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      The American Lucy is studying in Taiwan and is dating Richard that she met at a nightclub. When Richard has a briefcase to deliver to the mysterious Korean Mr. Jang, he tricks Lucy and cuffs her to the briefcase. Lucy has no other option but to meet Mr. Jang, who is a dangerous drug lord that kills Richard. Lucy discovers that the briefcase contains the synthetic drug CPH4 and she is forced to work to Mr. Jang as drug mule with three other men and transport the drug to Europe hidden in their abdomens. However one of her captors kicks her in the abdomen and releases the CPH4 in her body. Soon Lucy enhances her brain capacity and develops her physical and mental capabilities. She uses her abilities to kill the criminals and flees. However her power does not stop increasing and is destroying Lucy that needs to use more CPH4 to stabilize her body. She contacts Professor Norman, who is an authority in brain capacity, and the scientist becomes her hope to save her. But Mr. Jang wants to retrieve his drug and is hunting Lucy down.

      I would recommend this to a friend



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