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Customer Ratings & Reviews

Acer - 15.6" Chromebook - Intel Celeron - 4GB Memory - 16GB eMMC Flash Memory - Granite Gray-Front_Standard

Customer rating

Rating 4.5 out of 5 stars with 1259 reviews

93%
would recommend to a friend

Expert rating

Rating 3.7 out of 5 stars with 10 reviews

Pros

Cons

Customer ratings & reviews

Page 1, showing1-8 of 8 Reviews mentioning:
operating system
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Excellent

    Posted
    grandma
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® Elite Member

    It has a sleek design, it runs smooth and has a long battery life. But, this runs on Chrome OS which means most apps won't be available to be downloaded.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

    Student Laptop (Low Price)

    Posted
    KBestBuyReviews
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® Member

    The Acer isn't a top tier device. It's mostly meant for students who need to quickly get some work done, instead of traveling to your nearest library. It's slow, and ONLY runs on the CHROME OS. If you do not understand how to use chrome, get easily frustrated, etc. this isn't for you. I currently use this for online classes and work.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Overall good . . . with a few shortcomings

    Posted
    DCDC
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® Member

    I bought this mainly for web surfing and pleasure reading. Chrome OS does not have the complexity of Windows and will require that you learn a bit, but it is a low learning curve and Microsoft apps work fine on this. Keep in the Microsoft apps are stripped down significantly (and are available only if you have an Office subscription), so don't plan on using it for mail merges and complex spreadsheets. For basic writing, research and web browsing, it is acceptable. You cannot add your own software to this machine. The reason for the 4 is screen quality -- it has a bluish hue at low brightness levels for a lot of the web pages. I paid $150 during the holiday season, and I think it is a bargain at that price. Further, you can customize settings a bit if you search on keyboard and touch pad on the settings menu, and this will make the machine more familiar and easier to use.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Great PC for the price

    Posted
    NewChrome
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® Member

    This is my first Chromebook. The product itself works very well, and the simplicity of not having to worry about updating and security is a wonderful benefit. The inexpensive display is somewhat sensitive to viewing angle to get the best image, but is not a barrier to normal use. Since the operating system is in the cloud, it requires you to log into your gmail account every time if you shut down the computer. If you leave it on and close the lid, it will open up without logging in. If you shut down the PC after each use, and if you have a complicated gmail password, reentering the password each time can be annoying. If you use Office applications like Word, Google Docs has apps that allow you to read, create or modify documents without having to have Microsoft Office software. Because of the cloud based operating system, there is a delay of a couple seconds each time you delete an email. Still, for the price, this is a great PC.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

    Great Chromebook Ruined by a Terrible Screen

    Posted
    SamG
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
    • My Best Buy® Elite Plus Member
    • Top 1000 ContributorTop 1000 Contributor

    I've a lot of good things to say about the Chromebook 15. It's a really solid computer that can do a lot more than you should reasonably expect from something in this price range. A Chromebook in this price range inevitably has to make compromises, but for me it comprised too much on the screen and I can't fully recommend it for that reason. I'll start with what I like about the Chromebook 15, which is a lot. It's 15.6" laptop in a body to match. It's got a very 2012 look and you're not going to fool anybody into thinking this is some high end $1000+ machine, but overall I like the the look even if it's pretty mundane. It's plastic throughout, but it feels nice for what it's. The plastic on the lid and on the inside where the keyboard sits is nice to touch and doesn't attract a ton of fingerprints. It feels well-built as well and there's no noticeable flexing or creaking. I like the keyboard - it's plenty big and there's good spacing and travel on the keys, though it'sn't backlit (something you shouldn't be expecting at this price really). The trackpad isn't bad and it does support multi-finger gestures (but not pinch-to-zoom as far as I can tell). There are speaker grills flanking either side of the keyboard and they put out a good amount of sound. The 'HDR webcam' isn't great; it'll get you by if you really need it, but it's super-grainy and washed out. For ports you're getting two USB 3.0, an SD card reader, HDMI output, and a headphone jack. Charging is through a standard barrel plug connector; no USB-C charging here. The specifications are definitely on the low end, but for the most part I found the Celeron processor and 4GB of RAM to be adequate for most everyday stuff like browsing websites and watching videos. I did notice that the scrolling could get hung up on some websites every now and then, but there was never anything that made it frustrating to use the Chromebook. The nice thing about Chrome OS is it doesn't need much in the way of internal hardware to run well, which is what makes computers this cheap possible in the first place. The battery life is also really good and the Chromebook does a really good job of going to sleep and waking up quickly. I found that using the Chromebook to be a very familiar experience for me. I've been a pretty heavy Google Chrome user for a long time now and Chrome OS is basically that, plus a few functions to manage the actual PC settings. When Chromebooks first came out being limited to Chrome felt like a big deal, but for me (and a lot of other people I suspect) about 90% of the things I do on the computer involves opening Chrome first anyway. Things like real photo/video editing and gaming are not going to have very good options on Chrome OS, but browsing websites, watching Netflix/YouTube, streaming music, etc. all work great in Chrome. I don't think most people are going to miss Windows or Mac OS for everyday web stuff. I should also mention that the Chromebook 15 also supports Android apps through the Google Play Store, but most of the ones I tried did not scale very well to a 15" non-touch screen, so this falls under a "good to have" feature for me. Now that I've gotten all that out of the way I'll get to the thing that broke the whole experience for me, and that's the screen. It's just terrible, and not only because of the 1366x768 resolution, but that's a big part of it. A screen this big just shouldn't have such a low resolution and it's very easy to see it as soon as you look at it. Most of the internet I use just isn't made to show very well on this low of a resolution, especially on such a large screen. It feels like everything is forever zoomed 200%. Watching videos can be okay if you get the right angle, but text is forever fuzzy. The viewing angles are awful too. I am constantly adjusting the hinge on this to get the right angle because even getting a little off blows the whole thing out. It's something I've to adjust even if I change my seating position. Even at the optimal angle the colors are very muted. If the viewing angles and colors weren't so bad I could maybe forgive the 1366x768 resolution, but all these things combined really kept me from enjoying the rest of the Chromebook. Again, I understand that something in this price range has to make compromises, but I also understand that most people are buying 15" laptops over 12 and 13" ones because they want a big screen, and that should be the first thing you get right. I feel like Acer really missed the mark there and I just can't recommend this specific model because of it, but if you can find this computer with a Full HD display and it'sn't terrible I would spend the extra money and get that one. Acer probably makes it and if you can find that one I think you've got yourself a great little (big) computer.

    No, I would not recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

    A decent alternative for a typical computer

    Posted
    BravoMan
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
    • My Best Buy® Elite Plus Member

    The Acer Chromebook with Chrome OS is a decent laptop with excellent battery life for those looking for a simpler approach to using a computer. No complicated menus, no difficulty accessing resources, and so on. But even then, you have a familiar interface that anyone who has used a Windows/Android device (even just a little bit) will get an idea of how to interact with Chrome OS. Even if someone has no experience using a computer, they will have an easy time using and interacting with the Acer Chromebook. The hardware specifications are considered decent for what this Acer Chromebook is trying to achieve and some of the specs are very similar to what a mid-range Android tablet would have. Onboard the Acer Chromebook, you get 4GB of RAM, 16GB of internal storage (you won't get access to the full 16GBs since the OS will require some of that space), Bluetooth connectivity, 802.11ac wireless LAN, various ports like an audio jack, two USB 3.0 ports and an HDMI port to connect your peripherals, a 15.6" Acer ComfyView LCD, and some great integrated speakers. The Acer Chromebook is great for doing one or two things at the same time. Such as writing a document up using Google Docs and performing online research or perhaps listening to some music or a YouTube video in a different tab. One of the best and most recent features of Chrome OS is the access to the Play Store, which was normally only available to Android OS powered devices such as Smartphones, Tablets, etc. What this means is that you can install and use applications from the Play Store on the Acer Chromebook, which greatly increases the variety and amount of software/applications that can be used on the Chromebook. Now, let's get into my list of issues with the Acer Chromebook. I'm a heavy multitasker and I'm constantly using a large number of applications at the same time (as well as having anywhere between 20 to 50+ tabs open in various Google Chrome windows). When you try to multitask on the Acer Chromebook, you will quickly realize where its limitations are. One simple test I tried was to open up four different websites in a single Google Chrome window at the same time and as each site loaded, you could instantly see a drop in performance. Both in how the browser was handling the request and how quickly the page could be loaded. The Acer Chromebook will work well when you're focused on one to two specific things, but the performance will soon drop as you try to perform more tasks at the same time. Furthermore, if you do not make use of the Play Store to download applications that can make use of the local storage, you're pretty much required to be online at all time. Most if not all of the applications "installed" on the Acer Chromebook (Google Docs, Google Sheets, to name a few) are just hyperlinks that will open a new tab/window for Google Chrome to access the app online. And if for whatever reason, you cannot access a WiFi access point or there is no WiFi access point, you really have no other alternative. Unless you have and use an external USB to Ethernet adapter (which to my surprise Chrome OS was able to recognize and connect to the internet via this adapter with no prompts, you got to love Plug and Play) as there is no integrated Ethernet port. So long story short, the Acer Chromebook is great for simple tasks and a little bit of multitasking. The ability to download and install applications from the Play Store greatly expands what the Acer Chromebook can do. The battery life is amazing at giving you up to 12 hours of usage, which will definitely get you through the day, but the Acer Chromebook is not for everyone. If you're in the market for a device that can perform similar functions of an Android tablet, but provides you with a full sized keyboard, standard sized screen, with some extra ports that are normally not found on a tablet, then the Acer Chromebook might be a good fit for you.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Great little machine when used as it was intended

    Posted
    Steve62305
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
    • My Best Buy® Elite Plus Member

    I've worked in software development for most of my professional life. All those 30+ years were spent using computers running DOS, Windows, or a number of different flavors of Unix/Linux operating systems. This Acer Chromebook offering from Best Buy's Tech Insider Network gave me my first opportunity to use Google's Chrome OS, which is a Web-centric or cloud oriented operating system. Meaning its software apps and user data are normally run from and stored on web servers somewhere out there in Internetland. The first and most difficult thing I learned after a few frustrating sessions with this Chromebook is you cannot will the Chrome OS into acting like a drive-based operating system such as Windows. Once I stopped doing that I began to enjoy using it more. In fact, I actually came to like it. I guess it really doesn't matter all that much where your apps and data live as long as they're safe and secure. All the apps I installed and played with ran fast and none ever crashed. I'ven't done anything serious with the Chromebook yet. Mostly light duty stuff like trying different apps, Web surfing, email, streaming videos and music, word processing, and so on. Of course, that's the very stuff Chromebooks were designed to excel at. My wife has already laid claim to this Chromebook 15 as a second device with a larger monitor to supplement her tablet when she's doing genealogy research. My favorite use of this Chromebook 15 is reading my morning newspaper on it while all my paper newspapers pile up on a kitchen chair unopened. It's the perfect size for that task and I only have to manipulate four arrow keys with my right hand to read it while my left hand hand runs my morning coffee cup. Now, let's look at the Acer hardware. Overall, it looks and feels like a well-made notebook computer. The hinges are solid and will stiffly hold the monitor/lid in any position from about 5 degrees open through to its maximum of about 160 degrees open. That's very wide by the way. The initial 802.11ac wi-fi setup and connection went flawlessly and has been fast and rock solid ever since no matter where I take the Chromebook in our 4,100 sq ft, two-floor home. Because there is no hard drive, there is no noise and no heat build-up. In an unscientific test, I ran the Chromebook for several hours sitting on a hard surface. Then I closed the Chromebook, flipped it over and began measuring its underside with a laser-style thermometer. The bottom of the Chromebook case measured about 73 degrees F everywhere except the air vents. I'm pleased to report that the case measured only 79 degrees F in and around the air vents. That's only a 6 degree increase! Oh, and the entire underside of the case has a cross-hatch texture that helps keep the Chromebook from slipping off your lap or from your grip. Kudos to the Acer design team for that brilliant little idea. The speakers on this Acer Chromebook 15 are pretty decent to. Especially for a $199 laptop. At that low MSRP, I wasn't expecting much in the way of sound quality, but I was pleasantly surprised. We've listened to a lot of streamed music through the built-in speakers and through a Bluetooth speaker and then a pair of Bluetooth headphones. All sounded good and the Bluetooth connections were solid with no Bluetooth stutter or skipping. Not much of anything to report on the negative side other than I wish it had an RJ-45 Ethernet port. But then I wish my iPad did to. Times change, I guess. Overall, I can recommend this Acer Chromebook 15 without any reservation.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

    Budget Chromebook with Sacrifices

    Posted
    callmeageeth
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
    • My Best Buy® Elite Plus Member
    • Top 100 ContributorTop 100 Contributor

    I never owned a Chromebook before, but am heavily invested in the Android/Google ecosystem. So it's an easy jump for me. I primarily use a 15 inch Acer Aspire R laptop for work, which runs Windows 10. I've always been intrigued by Chromebooks, I like the idea of having all day battery life (although my Aspire R has pretty good battery life itself) and having a cheap device to surf the web, stream to my Chromecasts, and watch videos on the go. I've also previously owned a Surface Pro, and while they are fascinating and cool, I just need a bigger screen. So my Acer Aspire R is 15 inches and one of the reasons I chose the Acer Chromebook was the 15 inch size. To me the larger size matters, I'd rather sacrifice portability for a bigger screen. This Acer Chromebook looks good and has a nice build quality, but it's too big. It's too thick and there's a lot of wasted space due to the bezels surrounding the screen. This is even more apparent when you look at the keyboard, which is centered in the computer with a lot of open space to the left and right. In my aforementioned Acer Aspire, there's enough room for a 9 digit number pad to the right. And when you take into account the features this Chromebook lacks, the poor use of space is even more confounding. The biggest drawbacks in my mind, are the lack of an HD screen (no HD on a bigger than 11 inch screen isn'ticeable, if this were a smaller screen, you could get away without HD), no backlit keyboard (a shame) and no touch screen. This omissions surely allowed to meet the pricepoint, but to me, it seems like too much given up. 'm so used to touch screens, it's actually weird not having one. And as I said, with a screen this big, and given that Chromebooks are primarily consumption devices, the no HD is a big loss. The size of the Chromebook also makes it less portable. It'sn't heavy per se, but it's just bulky. My 15 inch Acer Aspire R is a bit smaller and it hits the upper limits in portability. Carrying this Chromebook around is no easy task. The specs for this Chromebook are also on the bottom edge. But that's no issue. Chromebooks aren't meant for resource intensive tasks, so if you plan on doing so, you should find a different operating system/machine. The big issue is 16 GB of HDD space, but that'sn't an issue to me, my photos and music are through Google Music and Photos, so I don't need HDD space. I'm also not managing documents. And if I needed more space, I'd use an SD card. This Chromebook as a full size card slot for SD cards, and the best thing is that if you put one in, the entire card fits inside the computer so it's "hidden." Onto Chrome OS. I'ven't spent a ton of time with it, but I like it so far. I use the Chromebook to surf the web, watch YouTube, stream Netflix and email. Logging in with your Google Account and having instant access to all of Google's services is great. But I must say, you can get a lot of the same functionality on a Mac or Windows machine if you utilize Chrome Web Browser. So far, I can't find value in Chrome OS that I can't get using Chrome Browser on Windows. I'm not saying the value and difference isn't there, but for what I do, I can accomplish the same tasks on Chromebook as I can Chrome on Windows. I've this Chromebook because I wanted a dedicated machine to use at home to act as a hub for my Chromecasts, Google Home speakers, etc. For what I use it for it's great. This is a good Chromebook, but it's average. If you want a big screen, this could be an option. But if you can spring a few more bucks, I'd look for a model with a better screen that has touch input. And one that has a bit more portability (without sacrificing too much in screen real estate). Assuming you don't have to lug this baby around everyday and it mostly stays in the home, the size and portability shouldn't matter. I do want to caution those who are just looking for a cheap laptop... If you aren't invested in the Google Ecosystem (i.e. don't have Gmail or don't subscribe to their services) and you are just wanting a cheap laptop, I'd make sure you do your homework. A Chromebook might not fit your needs.

    I would recommend this to a friend