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Rating 4.8 out of 5 stars with 11 reviews

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  • Rating 5 out of 5 stars with 1 review

    Blazing SSD Storage!

    Posted .

    For many, storage size and price are the two main driving factors when choosing an external storage solution. As such, it has become easier in recent years to acquire fast solid state drives for a reasonable price. In addition, with the advent of NVMe based storage, performance and pricing may not always be clear cut. For mainstream drives, it has become harder to differentiate which drive has the faster performance. In an attempt to try and find a fast SSD solution, we must first take a look at the latest SSD offering in Crucial's excellent line of storage solutions, the X6. With capacities ranging from 500 GB - 4 TB of storage, I was excited get my hands on this new drive and could not wait to compare it with other popular solid state drives. If anyone has already owned a portable SSD, then you are probably familiar with the unbelievably small nature of these units. Simply put, it still amazes me that so much storage can be packed in a small and lightweight solution. In the box, you will find the SSD, a quick start guide, and a USB 3.2 Type-C cable. It did not come with a Type-A adapter, but I already had several from previous SSD drives. Physically, the X6 stands on its own. It is a uniquely square design, clocking in just under 3 inches wide and 2.5 inches tall. Performance wise, crucial has listed the read speeds up to 540 MB/s over USB 3.2 Gen 1, which is comparable to other mainstream models. Setup should be relatively easy. The X6 comes already formatted in eXFAT. For my tests, I wanted to encapsulate all the Crucial X6 has to offer, as well as compare its blazing speed with other similar models. I decided I would compare the newly released Crucial X6 1TB drive with my SanDisk 500GB Extreme (Model: SDSSDE60-500) as well as the ever popular Samsung T5 1 TB (Model: MU-PA10B). Additionally, for data transfers, I wanted to keep my tests relatively simple to focus on an out of box experience. Aside from doing a quick format, nothing else was changed. As with anything computer related, data and benchmarks can quickly become complicated, especially when you factor in the different ways USB is implemented across a wide range of chipsets. Your results will differ! With this in mind, I wanted to give you an idea on what to expect with this drive given two drastically different computer environments. My first test was to run all drives in a non-USAP environment using Windows 7 Ultimate. I ran all drives over USB 3.0 using a USB Type-C to USB Type-A adapter on my Asus Maximus V Extreme Z77 motherboard. I used the same USB 3.0 port that is tied directly to the Intel Z77 chipset (not the AsMedia chip). My second test was to then use my Asus Flipbook 15 Q538 laptop (2020), this time over Thunderbolt /USB Type-C using Windows 10. The port is rated for 40 GBPS. All tests were conducted with the AC power plugged in. The power mode was set to best performance. Lastly, to compliment my Crystalmark 8.0.2 tests, I manually copied two sets of data. My first data test is one large 37.3 GB bluray image. The second transfer is one large 30.6 GB music folder, but features 5,446 files and 1,166 folders to test the random 4K performance. Here is the data for all drives using Windows 7 Ultimate from my desktop. Please keep in mind UASP is disabled due to not being supported in Windows 7. To shorten the data, I will only list the Sequential values and Random 4K at a queue depth/ thread of 1 (full results in the pictures). Crucial: Sequential Read: 371.82 MB/s / Sequential Write: 363.88 MB/s Crucial: 4K Read (Q1T1): 32.46 MB/s / Random 4K Write (Q1T1): 72.95 MB/s Samsung: Sequential Read: 368.51 MB/s / Sequential Write: 371.18 MB/s Samsung: 4K Read (Q1T1): 27.82 MB/s / Random 4K Write (Q1T1): 73.13 MB/s SanDisk: Sequential Read: 367.25 MB/s / Sequential Write: 371.03 MB/s SanDisk: 4K Read (Q1T1): 30.76 / Random 4K Write (Q1T1): 74.70 MB/s As you can see, all the drives perform equally. Despite not supporting UASP, Windows 7 still allows the drive to flex some muscle during my manual transfers. Starting with my 37.3 GB Bluray image, the Crucial X6 transfer started off really high around 540 MB/s mark before falling to 400 MB/s. Half the file was transferred before it leveled off in 360-370 MB/s range before finishing in roughly a minute. This was extremely fast. For my 30 GB music folder, the Crucial X6 was able to hold steady around 180-200 MB/s range. As you can see the transfer was a bit more aggressive, but nonetheless fast. The same behavior was noted on the Samsung T5 on the 37 GB bluray image. The transfer started off around the 540 MB/s range and slowly decreased to around 370 MB/s. The transfer completed shortly thereafter. For my 30 GB music folder, the T5 shot up to around 250 MB/s before slowly dropping to around the 200 MB/s mark. It held consistently for a little bit before holding around the 185-190 MB/s range. Both drives would continue to hold around the same range as the transfer duration prolonged. On my SanDisk 500 GB, the 37 GB bluray image was not as fast as the others, but more constant despite showing similar benchmark numbers. The transfer held steady around 270 MB/s. As for my 30GB music folder, the SanDisk was able to climb just under 200 MB/s and held consistently before dropping to around 190 MB/s. Overall, the Crucial X6 is certainly impressive. Moving on, the next set of transfers were done on my Asus Flipbook 15, which has a 1 TB Intel SSD. It is accompanied by an additional 32 GB SSD for an Intel Optane configuration. All drives were connected via the 40 GBPS Thunderbolt over USB Type- C port. It is powered by the Intel i7 1165G7 CPU. The results are as follows: Crucial: Sequential Read: 568.16 MB/s / Sequential Write: 511.74 MB/s Crucial: 4K Read (Q1T1): 35.78 MB/s / Random 4K Write (Q1T1): 74.32 MB/s Samsung: Sequential Read: 567.48 MB/s / Sequential Write: 512.26 MB/s Samsung: 4K Read (Q1T1): 30.07 MB/s / Random 4K Write (Q1T1): 80.85 MB/s SanDisk: Sequential Read: 567.85 MB/s / Sequential Write: 531.17 MB/s Sandisk: 4K Read (Q1T1): 29.50 MB/s / Random 4K Write (Q1T1): 56.19 MB/s Once again, the drives are fairly identical to each other. As expected, the drives were no longer bottlenecked by the operating system. There was a notable difference on the Random 4K (Q32T1) between the Samsung/SanDisk versus the Crucial. I assumed that it could be chipset related, despite having current specifications. As for my manual transfers, all drives were finally able to stretch their legs as they were no longer bottlenecked by the operating system. Starting with the Crucial X6, my 37GB bluray image held consistently between 385-390 MB/s, despite one instance around the 60% mark of the transfer where it dropped all the way down to 250 MB/s for a few seconds. I still am not sure what caused the dip. My guess would be either the X6 controller, my Intel controller, or the chipset . It may even have been a cache dump on one of the SSDs. I also tried swapping cables but the result was still the same. It certainly should not correspond with the Q32T1 numbers as this is more of a sequential transfer. Regardless, the X6 still finished in respectable time. The 30 GB music folder had no dips and held consistently between 335-350 MB/s. On my T5, the bluray image held consistently around 400-405 MB/s. The 30 GB music folder transferred around 360 MB/s before dipping much like the X6 did on the other transfer to around 250 MB/s. It eventually went back up to 360 MB/s. As for the SanDisk, the 37 GB bluray image dipped sharply in the beginning of its transfer, but quickly shot up to 400-405 MB/s and held it for the whole duration. However, the 30 GB music folder was much more inconsistent. The transfer ranged around 100-280 MB/s before peaking briefly around 315 MB/s but would drop sharply again. It would continue up and down for the remainder of the transfer. Overall, I am impressed with the Crucial X6. Its behavior is certainly on par with the other drives and is more consistent than my SanDisk on the music transfer. In addition, it is very competitive with the T5. In conclusion, the Crucial X6 is another fabulous entry in the external SSD market. While certainly not targeted as the fastest option, it certainly provides competitive speeds to other models within the same price range. It is compact and sporting a sleek square design allows you to easily move tons of data on the go. While your results will certainly differ, you should see comparable results, if not better depending on the chipset configuration. As it stands, the X6 performed as expected and will certainly please those looking for a fast external SSD. With that, the Crucial X6 comes highly recommended.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rating 5 out of 5 stars with 1 review

    Tiny Extension of your Internal Storage

    Posted .

    I got this hard drive with the wrong impression: I thought getting an SSD external drive was supposed to lessen the time it took for me to copy large amounts of data from one system and possibly speed up the time to upload the data from the external drive to another system. However, I realized the real value was the read speed. When I first received the drive, I copied 138 GB of music from one of my old laptops with an internal PCIe M.2 SSD drive and found that the time it took didn't look much faster than doing so using an external HDD. Mind you, the laptop port I used supposed Thunderbolt 3 support so I thought that would factor. The transfer took about 25-30 minutes. Still pretty good. However, I soon realized that the real value to having an external SSD drive like this model is the READ speed. Crucial's Crystal Disk Mark 6.02 Benchmarks showed read speed of up to 558.9 MB/s with a new drive, out of the box, and quick formatted to NTFS. The scores from my drive, after having copied 138 GB of music files onto it, then copied files off of it, scored a 562.7 read. In fact, the first two read scores fared better than Crucial, but fell off afterwards (comparatively). In practical use, the drive provides what Crucial intended to offer: an extension to storage without feeling the pain of using a slower external hard drive. I have two laptops running on PCI2 M.2 internal 512 GB SSDs (of course in reality that means I'm only really working with 458 GB max each, before accounting for OS). That may be more than enough space for most people, but work with large volumes of files on a regular basis. Previously, in using external HDDs, I learned to live with the lower read speeds where I could. Where I couldn't I would have to copy files from the external HDD to internal space. Using this drive, I haven't run into any cases of the latter yet. This drive gives me peace of mind to know that external storage doesn't have to be file-dumping areas anymore; they can truly be an addition to internal space. What makes things even better is the size! My previous experience with external SSD drives have been with the likes of G-Drives and others whose sizes match those of the familiar external HDD. This thing is less than HALF of those. I have a Seagate 2 TB external HDD that I thought was small, but man was I blown away with this Crucial drive! For me, the Seagate is pocket-sized, but this Crucial is pocket-sized to the point where I might forget it in my pocket and put it in the wash. I'm really happy that they included a 1 inch USB C cord with it too. Even with a cord that size, the drive tends to hang off the side of whichever system you're connected to in a bit of an awkward fashion, but due to it being as light as it is, it's more about its presence than any weight pulling down. For anyone looking to add more quickly accessible drive space to their system, I would highly recommend this drive.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rating 5 out of 5 stars with 1 review

    Small, Fast, & Great Value

    Posted .

    I really like this little SSD from Crucial. I have another internal SSD from Crucial in my desktop and I have also been very happy with its performance. This portable version is ideal from a performance and size standpoint especially if you travel. It’s small enough to fit into any pocket (only 2.5 inches square and thin). Performance is great. It’s rated at 540 MB/s and when I tested it performed admirably. I used Crystal Disk Mark version 8 to test it. On my Dell I7 with 12 gig of Ram and a 512 Internal SSD using the USB C connection I could get 568 MB/s of READ data. Testing the WRITE transfer I could still get 512MB/s. On my HP laptop with an I3, 8 gig Ram and an internal 256 Gb SSD using the USB C connection the number dropped slightly to 457 READING and 443 WRITEING. Still great performance degraded slightly by the computer system not the Crucial drive. I have attached photos of those test results. I would definitely recommend this product to anyone wanting a fast and compact backup source. Out of the small and simple packaging, this drive is ready to go. Its small, sleek, and easily connected to USB-C connections. And the 3 year warranty is there if you need it. I don’t think you will be disappointed.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rating 5 out of 5 stars with 1 review

    Very Slim; Works Seamlessly with Mac & Windows

    Posted .

    The Crucial X6 is incredibly compact and lightweight. I was able to plug this 1TB SSD into both my MacBook Pro and Asus Windows laptops to access and transfer files. No manual formatting, just plug and play! Transferring video and photo files was rather quick, I would say 4GB took about 10 seconds - much quicker than my 1TB HDD. I had no issues loading Final Cut Pro X project files or Photoshop working files directly from the Crucial X6. Not only has the performance been great so far, I also love how this SSD looks and feels. I like its durable plastic material. This SSD feels rugged enough to be tossed into a camera or travel bag. It’s extremely portable and compact enough to fit into a pocket. It comes with a short cable so it’s not taking up a lot of room in a bag. It’s small enough to fit in the palm of my hand which also means it’s not taking up a lot of room on a desk next to a laptop or on top of a gaming console. Overall, the Crucial X6 is a great product and I’m happy to have it to store my growing media collection.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rating 5 out of 5 stars with 1 review

    Excellent value for the money. Small and fast.

    Posted .

    I tested this device on three computers and for the most part the numbers were about the same and close to the manufacturer’s specs. However there were some exceptions. Especially on my Lenovo Desktop PC where it showed read speeds of 38 MB/s and then about 500 MB/s. I also compared the Crucial X6 to my Western Digital Passport SSD that is similar. Both are 1 TB. The WD is faster but it’s more expensive too. Read on for computers used and numbers for both SSDs. First let me say that the performance you get can vary a bit depending on the computer you are using the X6 with. A higher end, newer and faster computer will give the best performance. Also what programs are running on it when you transfer files can make a difference as well as USB cable length. Crucial also mentions this and that’s why it’s provided with such a short USB cable. I tested the 1 TB X6 on the following: Lenovo IdeaCentre 720-18ASU Ryzen 7 1700 16 GB with 540 GB Samsung 860 EVO SSD Acer Nitro 5 Gaming Laptop with Core i5 8300H 16 GB with 540 GB Samsung 960 NVMe-M.2 Asus Zenbook with Ryzen 5 4500U 8 GB with Intel 240 NVMe-M.2 I compared the speed results to a 1 TB Western Digital Passport WDBAGF0010BBL. All file Transfers and Testing were performed using SSD drives and Crucial supplied cable. Tests were done using Crystal Disk Mark 8.0.1 with default settings. I will refer to this program as CDM from here on out. In short my results were in line with advertised specs but did vary depending on the computer I was using. The Lenovo IdeaCentre was the slowest and the oldest being a late 2017 model. Testing the X6 with CDM produced a few wacky results such as 35 / 21 read and write speeds on the top line. Then later 421 / 418 and similar. It also did that once with the WD Passport. The results testing the X6 and Passport were within +-10 MBs with the middle being 425 read and write. The internal Samsung SSD I installed was the fastest with this computer at 556 read and 512 write +- 20MBs average. Next up and a year newer was the Acer Nitro 5 from late 2018. Results from CDM were a little faster than the Lenovo but not much. Both the X6 and Passport produced speeds right at 463 read and 450 write +- 10 MBs. However I want to note that the Samsung 960 NVMe-M.2 I installed produced speeds at 3530 read and 2460 write on average +-100 MBs. By far the fastest of anything I tested. Last up is the Asus Zenbook from 2020. The portable SSDs performed the best on this computer but the results varied more than on the other computers. The X6 peaked out at 560 read and 506 write whereas the WD PassPort peaked at 962 read and 925 write. Further testing and the two were closer together but the PassPort kept an edge of about 200 MBs. As for NVMe-M.2 in the Asus, I think Intel makes it and it runs at 1625 read and 800 write. I hope all the info from three computers, all with internal SSD Drives, and two portable SSD Drives helps out and shows that performance can vary greatly from computer to computer in some cases. Sorry but no photos of test results. I used my Note 10+ to take photos of the screens and aliasing made them look pretty bad. Plus You’re only allowed 6 photos. I thought about making composites of the screenshots but decided just to sum up my info instead. I figured the info was more important than photos in this review. Conclusion: It’s small, light weight, ran cool with testing and feels well constructed. It performed as well as the higher priced competitor’s product except on one computer. I would highly recommend it for the price and especially if it’s on sale.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rating 5 out of 5 stars with 1 review

    Excellent product, compact, quick

    Posted .

    Crucial has an excellent product. It is amazing how far USB storage devices have come. They used to be the size of a 5.25" drive enclosure. Now they are the size of a flapjack. Crazy. In the box you get the hard drive and a short USB C-to-C cable. It is a little disappointing that the cable is so short, but it is a sign of the times, I guess. A USB C-to-A cable must be purchased separately (or you could use the one that is included with your USB-C android phone). Speed wise, this thing is fast. Over USB C, I get write speeds over 70 MBps. Reading, writing and modifying files is almost as if the drive is an internal drive Crazy fast. One downside to this product is that there are no indicator lights or any switches (like for power, for example). This is more along the lines of "external" storage, as opposed to "USB flash" storage. As such, I would expect things like a read/write light, a power light, a power switch maybe. I get more lights with some of my cheapo USB flash drives sadly. Another big downside is that you need to be more careful not to lose the drive. Perhaps you should invest in those new Apple locator devices heh. I tried operating the drive on my OnePlus 6 using the stock Oxygen OS, as Crucial says Android is supported. Oxygen OS did not see the drive. I then reimaged my OnePlus 6 with LineageOS (i was overdue for a reimaging, I didn't do it specifically for the review, heh) and the drive read properly, although formatting is required by Android. The drive does come formatted for Windows and reads fine in Windows, but I guess that is insufficient for Android OS. I definitely recommend the drive.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rating 5 out of 5 stars with 1 review

    Lots of storage in a small space.

    Posted .

    The Crucial X6 1TB Portable SSD arrived a couple days ago in the late afternoon. Before launching into my review, it’s important to note that I’m not a “computer geek” – I’m just your average “Joe Lunchbox” computer user so I don’t have any magical insight to provide. The first step in going operational is to access the Crucial website and determine whether there were any firmware updates that had to be downloaded – there were none. Then I did a Quick Format for safety. After that, I immediately set about giving it a test run. My first effort was to copy almost 1.5 GB of family photos from my desktop to the Crucial external SSD. It took 9.5 seconds flat from start to finish! I’m impressed! I spent the next couple days playing around with it to make sure it stands up to my unintended but rough handling and my dogs. So far, the drive has held up to my daily use. I’ve moved it back-and-forth between my desktop and my laptop and there have been no incidents or problems so far. Data transfer from the laptop to the Crucial X6 were 300% faster than transferring the same files from my desktop. I’m not sure why but the fact that both are SSDs may have affected the speed. (Don’t forget to “eject” the Crucial X6 SDD from your computer just as you would with any other USB storage device.) The drive seems to be warm despite its lack of moving parts but, as I’ve found out, that heat buildup is due to the power it consumes. This is a very small external drive when you consider its 1TB capacity. It only measures only about 2.5 x 2.5 inches square and about 0.5 inches thick. I like that small size – it will fit easily into a pocket which means I'll be using it a lot. If I had a complaint, it would be the USB-C connecting cord is too short – I’d like to see about a 1-meter long cord (about 3 feet) instead just to make my life easier. I can get by with the short cord but I’d rather not have to do so. I’d recommend this drive, especially if you need to have a large amount of data with you on a frequent basis. It would be really great for storing all you vacation photos.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rating 4 out of 5 stars with 1 review

    Fast storage at a good price

    Posted .

    The move to SSD storage becoming more prevalent in the computer market has had a bit of a downside: it has taken us back to smaller storage capacities being the norm again. In the last few years, 1 TB hard drives were common in decent machines, but capable machines sold now are typically outfitted with 128 GB, 256 GB, or 512 GB at the upper end. The result is that getting a new machine these days may mean settling for less storage for the same money. Until recently, one solution to that problem was to add an external hard drive, but access speeds for physical hard drives aren’t really up to snuff compared to solid state drives. I recently upgraded my laptop to one with lots more memory and the latest Intel processor, but only half as much storage space as my 5 year-old laptop. I was using an external hard drive for less important file storage, but the arrival of the Crucial X6 1 TB external SSD gave me the opportunity to add storage space that was fast enough to serve as direct online storage, not just a space for files such as photos. So, the question I wanted to answer was this: is the Crucial X6 fast enough to be a reasonable extension of my laptop’s internal storage? To answer that, I decided to install a number of games on the X6. Games were one thing that I decided to install much fewer of on my new machine, since I don’t play them enough to make it worth giving up the storage space. As a comparison, I also installed the same games on an SD card to see how it would stack up against the X6. Installing and running games on the X6 worked flawlessly, but the experience wasn’t noticeably different on the SD card. So, I decided to test the read/write speeds directly, again comparing to the SD card. Crucial claims a read speed of around 559 MB/s and a write speed of around 510 MB/s. This is where I was surprised to find out how much better the X6 performed over my SD card. To help me quantify this, I used the freeware tool named “Flash Bench”. At the largest file size, my average read speed was 499 MB/s and my average write speed was 378 MB/s. At the 4K file size, read/write averages were 42/37. These were not quite up to the advertised speeds, but that’s to be expected on different machines. What really surprised me was the fact that my SD card, which I thought would compare favorably because it is also flash memory, was more than 5 times slower than the Crucial X6 and even a bit slower than my external physical hard drive! Maybe I need to look into the SD, but that’s for another day. Next, I copied large quantities of files back and forth from the X6, to directly get a feel for it’s reading and writing speed. What I found was that for really huge files, the X6 crushes it, transferring multi-gigabyte files in no time. What isn’t always intuitive is what those lower speed benchmarks for smaller files mean. When I transferred massive folders containing thousands and thousands of small and tiny files, the read/write speeds of all media types converged to around the same numbers. In that scenario, there was no real performance difference between the X6, a typical SD card, or my 1 TB external hard drive. Keep that in mind if you’re copying tons of tiny files and wondering why it takes so long. It doesn’t mean there’s something wrong with your new drive, it’s just the nature of the beast. In the end, I’ve concluded that the X6 is a great performer for a great price. It is small and light, which makes it easy to take with you everywhere. It’s rated for drops of more than 6 feet without damage, but I can’t bring myself to do that on purpose. My only complaint is that I wish the included USB-C cable were a little longer. A short cable makes sense, but it’s also a stiff cable, which makes it difficult to put it in a place that stays out of my way. This is a minor quibble, but it would have been nice to have a little more choice as to where to put the drive while it’s in use. I think the X6 is a great value, and I’m glad we’re finally starting to get some options on large capacity drives at a reasonable price. Crucial has a lot of experience making computer memory, so it makes sense that they’re leading the way here as well. If you need some more storage space for your computer or game system, you can’t go wrong with the X6.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rating 5 out of 5 stars with 1 review

    Excellent drive. Fast and portable.

    Posted .

    First, thank you to Crucial/Micron for providing a USB C cable. That is the way of the future! The drive is very fast and portable. I have a lot of critical documents on my MacBook Pro hard drive, so this Crucial drive is perfect as a portable Time Machine drive. I keep it connected to my laptop when travelling.. It backed up 750GB of data very quickly and seamlessly does my hourly backups. The provided cable is high quality and just the right length. Super drive for people on the go, whether to store photos and files or as use as a Time Machine backup drive.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rating 5 out of 5 stars with 1 review

    Excellent and compact

    Posted .

    This is a great portable drive. Love the size. I used with my MacBook. I was given the option to encrypt files. I was able to transfer several types of files to this drive. My MacBook recognized the drive right away. The drive is very responsive, and easy to use. File transfer was fast. Larger files transferred with lightning speed. When reading files straight from drive, still quick. This is a great, easy to use device. It comes with the USB-C cable.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rating 4 out of 5 stars with 1 review

    Good but not flexible

    |
    Posted .
    Owned for 3 weeks when reviewed.

    Features

    Quality
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Value
    4 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Ease of Use
    3 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     

    Works well, but doesn't do what I want. It came formatted as ExFat. I reformatted it as Fat32 to use for MP3s to play in a car. However, the car didn't recognize the drive. It works well as extended storage for a laptop that has a limited capacity SSD drive.

    Features

    Quality
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Value
    4 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Ease of Use
    3 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    I would recommend this to a friend