Main Content

Customer Ratings & Reviews

Google - Google Wifi AC1200 Dual-Band Mesh Wi-Fi Router - White-Front_Standard

Customer rating

Rating 4.8 out of 5 stars with 10346 reviews

97%
would recommend to a friend

Pros

Cons

Customer ratings & reviews

Page 1, showing1-8 of 8 Reviews mentioning:
channel
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Mostly Good

    Posted
    BobG
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® Elite Plus Member

    Even though Google WIFI is dual 2.4/5Ghz, devices that need to run on 2.4Ghz like Honeywell Lyric, Flir Security Cameras, will not connect to Google WIFI, and there is no way to manually select the channels . Other than that, devices that use 5G work great.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Awesome router (Could be better though)

    Posted
    ddalloo
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® Elite Member

    This router was good for the time I owned it, It gave me amazing coverage, the speed was relatively good. It did everything I would look for in a router. I had to return do to having compatibility issues with my smart home and smart assistant unfortunately. I also wish the parent controls where better and the option of spliting the channels.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Best router for overall performance

    Posted
    bahlahm
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® Member

    I had issues with several other routers as I needed 5GHZ channel to be steady in order to have internet connection at my house. Not sure why, but 2 GHZ channel was never working even though I had great signals. Then I tried Google Router and although it did not have a dedicated 5 GHZ line, it was working pretty good. I contacted Google support to discuss if they are going to provide option to choose specific channel an they were very helpful and told me they will put an enhancement request for it.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    uh....wow, really good.

    Posted
    scottgr66
    • My Best Buy® Member

    well I consider myself an above average techie... I had two routers in my two story house. One upstairs and one downstairs. The downstairs unit was a high powered ASUS router with giant antennas, etc.. . all designed to extend range and speed. Well pffft.... back yard still was slowish, jumping between channels once upstairs was painful...anyway, I thought i'd give google wifi a try. I had low expectations as I could always return. well, I have the two wifi points hard wired back to the main unit and the coverage is excellent. everywhere in the house. downstairs, upstairs, backyard... speeds are great. 80 MB in the backyard and 170 MB everywhere inside... I have switches set up so where I can hardwire my connections I defnitely do, but still this is really great. and the app, although basic is everything I need. heck even my wife can use the parental controls from her phone. :) I definitely recommend you give it a try. I love the speeds, having one SSID in the house and one guest channel and great reception everywhere... its cool to watch my iPhone switch access points automatically.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Solved all my networking problems

    Posted
    Matt
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® Elite Plus Member

    I live in a modestly sized 2000-sq ft two story home, though the ceilings are pretty high. We recently switched our ISP to AT&T, and so we use the provided DSL-modem. My wife and I have an iPhone 8 and X. When we switched ISP to AT&T, we found we were having difficulty connecting to the Wifi in the back bedrooms upstairs. Doing some reading on it, I found that others with our generation iPhones had similar Wifi issues, perhaps because Apple started favoring the 5 gHz bandwidth over the 2.4 gHz, that the 5 gHz bandwidth had limited range relative to the 2.4 band, and came to the conclusion that perhaps our provided modem could not broadcast the signal strongly enough. I tried a Netgear Nighthawk mesh extender first, which didn't solve our problems. The reported advantage of a mesh network over Wifi points or range extenders is that all points work together to broadcast one Wifi signal so that you remain connected to the same network as you move about. I was hesitant to try this product for two reasons: (1) Reviews said that you could not create a Wifi network with a dedicated 5 gHz channel and one with a dedicated 2.4 channel. As far as I can tell, this is true, and if this was the issue with our previous modem, it would not have solved our problem. @@@@@@@@ 2) The BB tech said that I would have to call AT&T to activate the router when hardwiring it to the modem, an extra step of hassle I didn't really look forward to dealing with. This mesh network solved all my problems. @@@@@@@@ 1) It's true you can't have separate dedicated 5 and 2.4 gHz channels, but that doesn't seem to have been the problem anyways. This mesh network has a feature that smartly "targets" the appropriate Wifi devices with the right bandwidth. Whatever feature is kicking in, it is working. @@@@@@@@ 2) I didn't have to call AT&T to activate this device. I plugged it into the modem and now ignore the signal broadcasted by the AT&T modem/router combo. Google Wifi broadcasts just fine. @@@@@@@@ 3) Three mesh network points for a 2000-sq ft house seems like overkill, but I can happily report that I have had zero problems since setting this up. Google released this product a couple years ago, but as far as my experience has gone, it seems it is still the gold standard for home networking.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Affordable mesh networking for the home consumer!

    Posted
    jerkface707
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® Elite Plus Member

    I deployed this at my mom's house, which is a 2 story, about 2600 sq foot. Due to the materials the home was built with during the late 80's, our comcast would peak out at around 60-75mbs download. Our plan is supposed to be at 175mb down/12mbs up. I have tried different access points, our best was an Apple Airport Extreme. I tried extending it with a spare Airport Extreme as well. I work in IT, working with Networks so I have tried everything from central placement, adjusting all settings (tried all channels) could never get above 75mb. Bypassing the access point and directly into the cable modem reports the full speed from Comcast. After installing the Google Wifi, I can report from all points of the home, performance and speed drastically improved. I'm now getting 160-175mbs download on the speed tests. The only con is that with it's simplistic interface, you are limited in terms of advanced setup. You can change the WAN IP address, but you can't change the LAN address. I had to change all my devices that were set up as static IP from 10.0.1. xxx to Google's 192.168. xxx.xxx. Some people may not like this, but I don't mind that you have this tied to your Google account. This allows me to monitor the network when Im out away (I already moved out of my mom's house years ago) so I can make sure my mom's internet is up and running, and can make adjustments when necessary. This is still out of stock everywhere! I'm luck that I was able to get my order in when it launched on Best Buy's website, got it in a week.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

    Decent Range. Simple to Manage. OK speed.

    Posted
    NYY0420A
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
    • My Best Buy® Elite Member

    In my last review for my Google Home I mentioned how I really like the no frills clean packaging and it shows once again from Google's Wifi system. Inside you see the 3 Wifi units and underneath is a quick start card along with 3 smaller boxes containing the power adapters for each of the 3 Wifi points. Routers are almost always somewhat bulky with a wide footprint, multiple lights and tacky looking antennas sticking out of the unit. This Google Wifi system is the complete opposite of that and reminds me of the Google Home design except this is even smaller. Wires are connected underneath so the plug ends are hidden leading to a cleaner look and antennas are internal. There is a light indicating connection status which can be adjusted via Google Wifi app. Setting up the initial Wifi point to act as my router is not difficult at all but unlike most routers in the market today that allow setup via desktop/laptop browser for instance, this Google system must be setup via mobile app with bluetooth enabled. The system stated that 3 units would be needed for up to a 5000 sq. ft. place but I live in a 2200 sq. ft and still needed all 3 units for better signal quality. Each unit has to be setup via the app but at least it is made easier by scanning the QR codes labeled underneath each unit instead of entering the information manually. I currently have a 200 MBPS speed package with Optimum and although the Google Wifi units report that the signals to and from the router is GOOD and the signal bar is maxed out, I am getting around 100 MBPS on the second floor. Testing the wired speed between my cable modem and Wifi router fetches 150 MBPS so there is a dropoff there as well. I was able to get 200 MBPS with my previous router. The hand-off of wifi connections to my iPhone or tablet is seamless from mesh unit to mesh unit as I move around the house, Just like setting up the units required a mobile app, the same app must be used for managing your network settings for Google Wifi. It is very simplistic and would be great for beginners. The brightness level for each unit can adjusted here with the option to turn off the light completely. There are options for Port Forwarding, Family Wifi and prioritizing devices. With that being said moderate to advanced users would find Google Wifi very lacking settings wise. There are no options to manually configure Wifi channel, frequency or VPN for that matter. I did not see a MAC filter option which almost all home routers have. This Google Wifi mesh system was just released to the public and is the lowest cost system in the market. Overall it is decent and has good potential going forward. My hope is that with improved firmware the speed will improve and they will allow more advanced configuration options. PROS: Good Range. User Friendly. Cheapest Wifi Mesh system in the market. Clean looking Design. Wires plug underneath unit. Very stable connections. Signal handoff from unit to unit is seamless and uninterrupted. CONS: No browser interface. Very limited network settings. Must use mobile APP and bluetooth. Average speed.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Great Mesh Wi-Fi Solution, But Not Without Faults

    Posted
    Panther68
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
    • My Best Buy® Elite Plus Member
    • Top 250 ContributorTop 250 Contributor

    NOT a TRUE mesh Wi-Fi system. Does this mean don't consider Google Wi-Fi? Hardly. For some, it's an excellent choice.maybe their best choice. UNBOXING, AND INITIAL IMPRESSIONS: Excellent job in the packaging design, Google. Not even Apple could have come up with packaging as elegant as this. The box isn't just "nice looking". it's top-quality, with a hint of Japanese influence. Upon opening the box, you find 3 Google Wi-Fi units in near-perfect presentation, with each unit appearing to be high quality. They are compact, & can easily be placed where they won't be overly noticed. Under the tray, there are 3 identical boxes, with each box containing a white power cord/adapter. The middle box also contains a white, flat, 6ft Ethernet cable. The power cord/adapters also have a unique design, almost Apple-esque, but better looking. The instruction sheet is very simple, explaining everything with 2 diagrams, and very few words. SETUP: Setup is a breeze, requiring only plugging the power cord into the chosen primary unit & wall outlet, plugging the Ethernet cable into the router's WAN port, & plugging the opposite end into the router. Configuring the primary unit (henceforth "router") is as simple as installing the app (Google Play, or Apple App stores), opening the app, making sure your Bluetooth is turned on, and scanning the QR code on the bottom of each node. From there, you select your SSID & password, the router automatically configures itself, & downloads/installs any available firmware update. I estimate it should take approximately 10-14 minutes to set up & configure a 3-unit system. In testing, I ran multiple speed tests & data transfer tests. For each type, I first ran the "current" router tests, followed by the Google Wi-Fi tests. So as to not use too much space, I'll only reference results. SPEED & SIGNAL STRENGTH TESTS: To begin, I set up only a single node to compare against my current router (brand A$^s). After running several speed tests on both 2.4GHz & 5GHz bands, I determined both routers operate almost equally, with download speeds of 89-92Mbps, and uploads of 6.5-7.5Mbps. After speed tests, I moved to signal strength tests, checking signal strengths on both bands. As with the speed tests, signal strengths proved approximately equal. Interestingly, while it's normal for signal strength to decrease as distance and/or number of walls increases, the percentage of signal decrease was not equal. On the 2.4GHz bands, my "current" router was marginally better at the closer distances, but as distance increased, signal strengths became virtually equal. For the 5GHz band, the results were the opposite. At closer distances, Google Wi-Fi produced slightly stronger 5GHz signals, but at greater distances, Google Wi-Fi had the greater signal strength loss. To test Google Wi-Fi's "mesh" ability, I added a second unit, to the far opposite exterior corner of the condo. To compare signal strengths, I also connected a repeater to my "current" router (same manufacturer as router), in the same location as the 2nd Google Wi-Fi node. Signal strengths on both the 2.4GHz & 5GHz bands were relatively consistant. DATA TRANSFER TESTS: A total of 15 data transfer tests were conducted, & internet speeds were not affected, as the internet provider connection is the true "bottleneck". For each (Google Wi-Fi, plus my "current" router), data transfer tests were conducted in 3 ways, all with a 1.01GB file. First, between two laptops. Second, from a network-connected drive to my laptop. Third, from my laptop to the network drive. The first 6 tests (3 per router/manufacturer) were done while connected only to the router, with the laptops & network drive in living room. The remaining 9 tests were done with the 'controlling' laptop in the back bedroom, and the other laptop & network drive in the living room. "controlling" laptop connected to the repeater/node, and the 2nd laptop & network drive connected to the router. 6 involved a 2-node Google Wi-Fi mesh against my "current" router, while 3 involved my "current" router plus the repeater. For the first 6 tests, the results were close, as expected. Moving to the 2-node mesh vs router-only configuration, my "current" router won (also as expected), although by a somewhat narrow margin. I expected the Google Wi-Fi's data transfer rate to be half, but it was much better. I won't spoil the fun, but kudos to Google, as I was extremely surprised. While I fully expected my "current" router-repeater configuration to cut data transfer speeds in half, or close to it, the results of the 2-node Google Wi-Fi were unexpected. While my "current" router-repeater configuration preformed far better than expected (data transfer speed degraded approximately 35%), the 2-node Google Wi-Fi configuration performed even better (data transfer speed degraded approximately 25%). What Google Wi-Fi lacks in advanced features, it makes up for in data transfer speeds. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: There is one point of interest (not "good", but not "bad") I discovered while testing. Google Wi-Fi automatically selects which band (2.4GHz or 5GHz) it connects to.there's NO ability to manually select your band. Also, with the app, you have no way of knowing which band your devices (computers, phones, tablets, etc) are connected to. Through the device, you might be able to determine this, but through the app, you can't. For devices with ability to connect via both bands, I assume they connects to the 5GHz band when in close proximity of a Google Wi-Fi node, and when signal strength degrades, it probably automatically switches to the 2.4GHz band. Additionally, Google Wi-Fi automatically switches channels, based on whatever channels have the lowest congestion. As with Google Wi-Fi's inability to manually select 2.4GHz or 5GHz, there's also no ability to manually select the channel. To use Google Wi-Fi, you need a Google account (ie. Gmail address). According to Google, Google Wi-Fi doesn't collect user activity data.only network, hardware, and app-related information. You do have the ability to turn this off in the setting's 'Privacy' section. As a constant connection with Google is required, this could be a'deal breaker' for some. However, it should be noted that Google's "mesh network system" isn't the only hardware requiring this. Of the other two well-known mesh networking hardware manufacturers, one has an identical requirement. Additionally, there's no web browser interface. An Android/iOS app is needed to set-up Google Wi-Fi, and to configure & maintain Google Wi-Fi. This is, again, a'deal breaker' for some.and an advantage for others. Personally, I've found this to be a considerable advantage. THE GOOD: Ease of setting up Ease of configuring Ease of maintaining Compact form-factor Modular design (can handle up to six units, up to a 10,500sf house (by my estimates)) Inexpensive (comparted to other mesh Wi-Fi systems) THE BAD: Few advanced/customizable features (this could change in future updates) No DDNS or VPN ability Port forwarding, and DHCP, are difficult to configure THE UGLY: No MAC filtering (this could change in future updates) No switch, limited to single physically-connected network device (unless external switch is added) FINAL THOUGHTS: Is Google Wi-Fi for you? It depends on your technical expertise, how much security you need, & how much network control you want. If you live in an apartment/small condo, then the answer is probably "No". For the same $129 price of a single Google Wi-Fi unit, you can get a router with more advanced features. If you live in a house/large condo, the answer is complicated. For power users, Google Wi-Fi will NOT meet your needs. If you're an "average" consumer wanting/needing a mesh network, but want advanced features (ie. MAC filtering), until Google adds these features (if Google adds them), the answer is still "No". However. "good news" time.for the average consumer needing a mesh Wi-Fi system, who doesn't need MAC filtering, DDNS, VPN, etc, Google Wi-Fi might be your BEST choice. You're NOT going to find a more affordable mesh Wi-Fi system. You're NOT going to find another home networking system that's easier to set up, or configure. You're NOT going to find home networking equipment that's easier to maintain. Simply put, if I were shopping for a mesh network system for family/friends, I knew they had a large area-of-coverage need, & I knew they didn't need MAC filtering, VPN, DDNS, etc, Google Wi-Fi would be the ONLY system I'd consider for them. Disclaimer: This product was provided free, or at reduced cost, for the purpose of reviewing the product. Nevertheless, the above review, be it positive, negative, or somewhere in-between, is a 100% honest review, and the price paid played absolutely no part in my review.

    I would recommend this to a friend