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HP - OfficeJet Pro 9025 All-In-One Instant Ink Ready Printer-Front_Standard

Customer rating

Rating 4.5 out of 5 stars with 88 reviews

89%
would recommend to a friend

Expert rating

Rating 3.8 out of 5 stars with 2 reviews

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Customer ratings & reviews

Page 1, showing1-3 of 3 Reviews mentioning:
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  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    A solid workhorse

    Posted
    GH06903
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network

    I have been using HP Inkjet printers for years and have been fairly satisfied with the performance and quality of their printers. I currently own a Officejet Pro 8710 printer and love it. Having never seen the HP OfficeJet Pro 9025 All-in One printer as it was sent to me as a pre-release item to be reviewed, I was expecting to see another version of my 8710, but this printer was altogether different looking. I has a much more business like appearance similar to the HP Officejet Pro 7740. Setup was fairly straightforward. After removing the packing materials and powering on the printer, I opened the front and installed the ink cartridges. I downloaded the HP Smart app to my phone following the included instructions. Evidently this printer is so new that you have to download a new, yet to be released version of the smart app. From the software you select add a printer and the app walks you through the process. Within 10 minutes, the printer was up and running. The display asked me to do a scanner alignment which first prints an alignment document which you place on the scanning bed. The small screen prompts you to continue and quickly performs it's alignment. Now for the specs: Much like any decent all-in-one, the HP Officejet Pro 9025 can print, copy, scan and FAX. It prints up to 24 ppm black, up to 20 PPM Color. This beats my Officejet Pro 8710 by 2 pages per minute. It can do 2 sided copy and scan and has optical character recognition capability. It also has two 250-sheet input trays which is excellent (my 8710 only has 1. The output tray can hold up to 100 sheets. Based on these specs, it seems more equipped for heavy duty office work rather than occasional home office use. My one gripe is the 2.75" screen (I had to measure it diagonally since the spec wasn't listed in the printer setup materials or on the box). The screen seems small and it's a little hard to read at certain angles. Performance wise it did very well. I know it's only 2 PPM faster than my current printer, but it seemed a lot faster. It also seemed a lot mor sturdy while printing without the swaying my 8710 seems to do when printing lines of text. As expected, the print quality is excellent, both in black and white and color. Litter to know bleeding occurred even when printing a photo on regular printer paper. This printer is also "Instant Ink" ready. HP Instant ink is a plan you can sign up for that charges a fee based on the number of pages you print each month. The printer sends ink level information to HP, and when the printer runs low on ink, replacement ink cartridges are shipped to you. You do not need to purchase replacement ink cartridges from retail stores when you are enrolled in HP Instant Ink. I have never signed up for this service, but I can see it being good if you do a lot of printing. I am very impressed with the quality and performance of the HP Officejet Pro 9025. Since it's not a released product as of this review I have no idea what it costs, so I can't give an opinion on it's value proposition is, but it's a solid performer.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Great printer for small office with few trade offs

    Posted
    Daved
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network

    I work out of a home office and, while I don't run through stacks of paper a month, I have periods where I need to print quite a bit in one go. More so, I have a need to scan stacks of documents regularly, so I find great use with document feeders. For my office needs I currently employ a HP OfficeJet 8600 Plus. Until I tested the OfficeJet Pro 9025. First thing, out of the box, this printer is bright, bearing a slight resemblance to the 7000 series OfficeJets with a two-tone color scheme of white and grey. The middle of the body is white, capped off with a grey lower paper tray and grey document feeder on top. It's a much sharper appearance than the grey/brown of the 6000 and 8000 series printers. Additionally, the design language is much sharper and more modern, foregoing the rounded, sometimes "bubbly" design language of the 8000 series in favor of boxier lines and 90 degree angles. It's very square and rectangular, and even features a flat top to the document feeder, which has historically carried a more rounded apperance. The new design language is very appealing, and seems more focused on function than form. It has a very purposeful, functional, and professional appearance to it. It also lends a more slimmed down look to the printer, which makes sense given that the overall box is indeed slimmed down by several inches. My 8600 was purchased because it supported fax, printing, scanning and copying, 2-sided printing, and a document feeder on top, but the machine is bulky and heavy. The 9025 manages to squeeze all this in to a smaller package, indicating some nice internal design efficiencies. While you don't move a printer around all that often once it's setup, moving between the 8600 Plus to the 9025 reveals quite a difference in weight. In size, the 9025 is the same height as the 8600 Plus, but squeezes a second paper tray into that space, and maintaining the same capabilities with the document feeder. Front to back and side to side, however, the 9025 bests the 8600 Plus by quite a bit. My 8600 Plus shared a desktop with my photo printer, and had only 19.5" wide and 20.25" deep to fit in. Because of the printer size, it had to face perpendicular to my other printer, with the output tray kept in most of the time to avoid bumping it. The 9025 fits facing parallel to my other printer with room to spare, and even with the output tray adding 6" to the depth, only sticks out .375" at the front. To accomplish this, it appears HP made some internal changes to the printer, stacking things a bit taller and further back in the box. The output tray sits a bit higher and a bit recessed into the case, and fits 2 paper trays beneath it compactly. The doc feeder on top also seems slimmed down a bit, allowing it to fit in the more compact design. The only issue I really have is with the power cord placement. If it were offset a bit, or even if HP included a right-angle cord, this printer could sit even further back. I do believe some sacrifices were made to accomplish the smaller and lighter design, and after playing with it for about 2 weeks now, I think it's apparent in the feel of some of the materials. First, the plastic on the 9025 feels more flexible and thinner than the 8600. When I open and close the doc feeder cover I feel like I am about to break it. This contrasts the 8600 which uses a latch to open and close, and feels better. Additionally, the overall feel of the 9025 is more plasticky than the 8600, and leads to some question of durability under heavier use or in environments with multiple people using it daily. Second, the print head has a spongy and less reassuring feeling when inserting printer cartridges. With the 8600 there is a tactile feel to the cartridges clicking into place, letting you know they seated properly. With the 9025 I found myself checking the cartridge a couple times to make sure it was in all the way. They also made squeaky sounds when I inserted and removed them, and though that might go away with time, it has not yet. They also sacrificed on the screen size with this model, opting for a smaller screen that is just over 1.5" tall and 2" wide, where the 8600 was about double the width. With all the features and apps being added to these printers, the screen size is really important, and I think this one is just too small for it's purpose. They also have a swipe down from the top feature to access settings and information, similar to a smart phone, and this menu is more challenging to read on the smaller screen. I do like the new mechanics for adjusting the screen angle, which doesn't require a button pinch of press, like my 8600, but I also believe this might be the reason for a little bit of movement when interacting with the screen. At first I thought there was a slight click action or sound when pressing a button on the screen, but it appears to just be the screen moving a bit under pressure. Moving beyond the look and feel of the new printer, from a performance perspective it does very well. Setting it up out of the box was really easy, thanks to the HP Smart software guiding through setup. Additionally, you can use the HP Smart app on your phone to setup the printer via bluetooth. I did run into issues connecting to the printer from just under 6 feet away, and found it woked best standing 2 feet or less in front of it. Once ink is inserted, the printer primes the cartridges, and I noticed it to be a bit quieter than the 8600 Plus, but also a bit higher pitched. My 8600 had a more mechanical sound to it when priming new cartridges, but I don't think this indicates any issues or performance problems. What was indicative of a change, though, was the sound and action when the printer wakes to print. The 8600 makes a loud, mechanical sound when it wakes to warm up, and takes a noticeably longer amount of time than the 9025. In contrast, the 9025 is quick and relatively quiet when waking to copy or print. Additionally, the 9025 is quieter during normal operation as well, whether printing, scanning, or copying, even on the document feeder. I found the print quality of the 9025 to be really good as well, providing crisp and clean colors, as well as sharp text, which my photo printer doesn't do so well with. I would still use my photo printer for high quality photo prints, since the color depth and quality of photos is great than the OfficeJet printers produce. That said, I have always found the OfficeJet printers to handle text prints very well, and the 9025 continues that trend. Running through a copy test, however, revealed some areas for improvement with the 9025. Using the standard HP test print, I copied on both the 8600 and 9025, and the 8600 seemed to provide a cleaner copy, producing sharper edges and slightly better color. Both printers struggled with the grey text at the base of the sheet, though, with the 8600 barely able to present something identifiable as text, and the 9025 providing only marginally better results. With the higher contrasting text both did fine, so it seems to be a struggle point with the lower contrast of the grey. 2 sided printing was also easy and clean, though speed of that didn't seem noticeably faster than the 8600. I tried to capture some of the differences in print quality in one of the images I added, but it might be difficult to completely see them. One BIG thing I have been avoiding with the HP printers is the subscription ink plan. My fluctuation in usage means it won't really benefit me, and I am also not a fan of subscription services tied to my daily business needs. The ink being delivered as needed with Instant Ink is a cool idea, but I don't like the idea of HP tracking what I print, or making it more difficult for me to print if I decide to use a 3rd party cartridge. I have also read some issues with customer service around the subscription, with people having difficulty canceling, or getting potentially overcharged due to peak printing periods. I did decide to sign up for a trial of it through the website, and while I can see my usage and plan info, I haven't used it enough in the past 2 weeks to be able to review the service yet. Overall, I like this printer very much and am going to give it a shot as a daily replacement for my 8600 PLus, which is a big step for me. The compact size is a HUGE benefit for my office space, especially with it still including 2-sided printing, a doc feed, and the 2 paper trays. I wish the screen were about double the size, and I wish the feel of the plastic on it didn't feel as flexible or flimsy as it does. Because of those issues I want to drop half a star off the rating, but I still think this is a fine machine for someone who has a home business or work-from-home office that needs these features. Because I can't drop a half star, and I don't think it warrants 4 stars, I am leaving it as 5. It's fast, quiet, compact, light, and very functional, and I think it's definitely worth strong consideration.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    A light-weight solution with plenty of Features

    Posted
    Zunderwood
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network

    It's been a few years since I've owned an HP printer, and I always appreciated their solid construction and their industry leading software. Form-wise, the HP 9025 is much different from what I've owned in the past. Weight-wise, it's very light. I'm used to printers that you could use as boat anchors. I'm sure HP redesigned their current line of printers from top to bottom to achieve these weight savings. While I appreciate not having to go to a Chiropractor every time I move a printer, components like the paper drawer just seem so flimsy. The 9025 is an All-in-One printer stocked full of neat features. To access these features, the 9025 has an accompanying Smart App for your Android or IOS phones. The App allows you to create Smart Tasks - which can be used at the Touch Screen on the printer or when using the Smart Task App. You can scan a document, email yourself a copy, or deposit a scanned document in Cloud Storage like Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box, DropBox, and others. This isn't a complete list of features, but I did have a chance to test these out: . Email an attachment to myself with the attachment originating from: o my phone's camera o HP 9025's scanner o File located in Google Drive, DropBox, OneDrive or others o Photos located on my phone or in Facebook or Instagram. . Save a photo or document o I set up two: OneDrive and Google Drive . Transfer a document (or photo) from one location to another. There's more, for sure. I played around with the scanner quite a bit, and it's quite fast. The document feeder seems small compared to other products I've owned, which means that some of the larger scans I'm expecting in the near future will have to be broken into smaller groupings. The 9025 has two document drawers each of which can handle 250 sheets of paper. The HP 9025 has a Touch Screen on the front side of the unit, and many (if not all) of the functions you can initiate using the phone-based Smart Tasks App can be accomplished using the Touch Screen. The Touch Screen, however, is painfully small. I recognize that someone with under 50-year old eyes might not care, but for me I plan to sit a pillow on the floor, while reading an on-line version of the HP 9025 manual with my extra powerful reading glasses - all to accommodate the small Touch Screen window. @@@@@@@@ Okay, I might be embellishing a bit. @@@@@@@ Scanning was one of HP's strongest suites in the past. Now you've less control over what it does. Remember when you could change Contrast and Brightness of individual pages after a document was scanned if the original suffered readability? I'm still looking for a way to do this with the 9025. Using the Smart Tasks App, your only scanner controls are: Black or Color, Resolutions from 75 to 300 (200 is default), and per Page Rotation (clockwise/counterclockwise), if necessary. There are other default options available that you can set if you connect to the 9025 using a web browser pointing to the 9025's I.P address. One nice feature of the document feeder is that it can scan both sides of a page simultaneously when scanning an original document. Yet, it defaults to 1-sided scanning. You can make it default to 2-sided, but only by connecting to the 9025's I.P address and making a change there. . I'm hoping this changes over time as it'sn't a practical approach for real-world scanning. Let's say for a minute that you're scanning a 10-page document where two of the pages have information front and back. If the scanner is set to 1-sided scanning, then you'll have to take steps to individually scan the back sides of those two individual pages after the batch has finished scanning. If you set the scanner to 2-sided scanning, then every page of the 10-page stack will have its front and back scanned and the resulting PDF file will have eight blank pages in the final document. It would be really great if the scanner app had an option to "Skip Blank Pages'. Problem solved. I'm pretty comfortable setting up new technology. After more than 30 years in I.T, I rarely break a sweat doing so. Not so with this unit. I fought for days trying to get the 9025 to email me a scanned document. By luck, I remembered that there's an issue with Two Factor Authentication (also known as 2-Step Verification). If you're not familiar with this, it's a security feature (I use Google's implementation) that helps ward off bad guys trying to hack into your account. I don't know how widely it's used, but I've been using it for years. To email a document from the HP 9025, the HP configuration software asks you to provide your login credentials. So, I provided my username and password to the configuration software. Once entered, I selected the Test option to see if it was set up properly. Each and every time the test would fail. The error message would simply tell me that either my credentials were wrong or that the target Google SMTP server might be down. What it doesn't tell you is that since you're set up to use Two Factor Authentication that you'll have to use a Google-provided'special password' that Google will issue you for this purpose. Once I realized that that's what was going on, I obtained my'special password', entered it into the configuration tool, and bang, the app was now happy. Well, almost. It was would work perfectly from the configuration tool, but won't work from the 9025's Touch Screen or the Smart Tasks App. Seems like I've more to research before this will be working seamlessly. Aside from the above issue, there's a cool option that allows to you send prints directly to your HP printer even if you're out of town. Go to the www.hpconnected.com web site, create an account if you don't already have one, and then add your new HP 9025 printer using the 'Add Printer' button. It then lets you assign the 9025 an email address that emails (with or without attachments) can be sent to. The website will make sure that the email name you've chosen isn't already in use by someone else. For example, let's say I named the email 'TooBigToLose'. The website will confirm that no one else is using that email name, and if all is okay your printer's newly assigned email address will be TooBigToLose@HPePrint.com. To try it out, just email a document of your choosing to that email address and watch it print transparently to your printer. The HPConnected website has other tools, too, like allowing you to specify who can send emails to that email address. One of the last things I wanted to talk about is the Instant Ink program. If you sign up for this program - and not all printers are capable of offering this service - communication between the ink cartridges and your HP 9025 printer will occur, and the information will be sent back to HP so they can monitor how many pages you've printed each month, and how much ink you've used. With that in mind, prices are tiered as such: Free Plan: $0 cost per month. You are limited to 15 printed pages free each month. Every 10 pages after that will cost you $1. Occasional Plan; $2.99 per month. You are limited to 50 printed pages each month. Every additional 15 pages will cost you $1 Moderate Plan: $4.99 per month. You are limited to 100 printed pages each month. Every additional 20 pages will cost you $1 Frequent Plan: $9.99 per month. You are limited to 300 printed pages each month. Every additional 25 pages will cost you $1 Let's assume you've signed up for the Occasional Plan, which for $2.99 a month you're allotted 50 free pages. If you print less than that a month, the balance of unprinted pages will be carried over to the next month - although the most carry-over balance you can accrue depends on your plan. So, the most carry-over balance for the Occasional Plan is 50 pages, 100 carry-over for the Moderate Plan, and 300 carry-over for the Frequent Plan. What's nice about these Instant Ink plans is you won't have to worry about ordering replacement ink because the printer is constantly communicating your ink status directly to HP. In short, they'll automatically ship you out replacement cartridges without any action on your part. I did read that they ship the cartridges out regular mail, so it can take as many as 10 days before the replacements reach you. Not sure how accurate that timeline is, but that could be problematic if you're real short on ink and have some big jobs to print out. I also read that the Ink program considers just one word on a page to be the same as a whole page of printed words. Consider all those times you've printed a two-page document that just happened to overflow to a third page where the third page has nothing but a page counter on it. Well, you've printed three pages to count against your monthly total. Or, consider the implications if you gave your family and friends your HP email address, and that they've been emailing you hundreds of photos and recipes from past family events. That can certainly eat into your monthly free page allocation. Overall, I'm favorable to this ink replacement plan. I typically spend $60-$80 a year on new ink cartridges, so even the Moderate Plan ($4.99) is a money saver for me. So, I'm not really complaining. I'm simply raising these issues because it's good to know the rules behind the plan. All in all, I'm impressed with this printer. Only time will tell how the Ink program will work for me, but I'm game to give it a good try.

    I would recommend this to a friend