Roy Rogers Collection: Days of Jesse James/King of the Cowboys/Roll On Texas Moon [DVD]

Break out the six-shooters and mount your horses for the Roan Group Archival Entertainment and Troma DVD's release of three exciting Westerns in The Roy Rogers Collection, Vol. 1. Featuring digitally mastered prints taken from the best source materials available, this set of The Days of Jesse James (1939), King of the Cowboys (1943), and Roll on Texas Moon (1946) will have fans of the well-loved singing cowboy lassoed in with its solid presentation and some exciting extra features. Presented in their original 1.33:1 full-screen aspect ratios and featuring an English Dolby Digital audio mix, this release also provides viewers with an alternate version of King of the Cowboys than was seen in its original theatrical release. Featuring a Roy Rogers' "Riders Club" short used to open Rogers film festivals, an extended cut of King of the Cowboys featuring footage taken from a rare Armed Forces print, and the original uncut version of Roll on Texas Moon, nostalgic fans of the beloved cowboy will find this dual-layer disc a must-have addition to their collection. A King of the Cowboys theatrical trailer rounds out this fine DVD that ensures Roy Rogers a special place in the hearts of fans for generations to come.
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Overview

Special Features

  • Movie trailer

Synopsis

Roll on Texas Moon
Roll on Texas Moon was the first of 26 Roy Rogers vehicles directed by fast-action specialist William Witney. The plot concerns a deadly feud between cattle ranchers and sheepherders, with the villains playing both ends down the middle. Working on behalf of the cattlemen, Rogers tries to avoid an all-out range war, finding time to champion the cause of gorgeous sheep rancher Jill Delaney (Dale Evans). Dennis Hoey, best known for his portrayals of the thick-witted Lestrade in Universal's "Sherlock Holmes" series, is rather surprisingly cast as the main heavy. While the musical content of Roll on Texas Moon is as omniprescent as ever, the "thrill" content is considerably heightened by the expert contributions of William Witney. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Days of Jesse James
Donald Barry plays the legendary outlaw of the title in this Roy Rogers Western which, needless to say, plays fast and loose with history. Returning to Missouri from the gold fields of California, Gabby Whittaker (George "Gabby" Hayes) is persuaded by his granddaughter, Mary (Pauline Moore), to deposit his earnings in the Northfield bank, which is then promptly robbed. Assigned by the Bankers' Association to track down the presumed culprits, Jesse James and his brother Frank (Harry Worth), Roy Rogers soon learns that the Jameses are innocent in this particular crime, which was instead committed by the bank's greedy president, Sam Wyatt (Arthur Loft). Before Rogers can capture the wily banker, he must contend with the interference of Captain Worthington (Harry Woods), a railroad detective more interested in pocketing the 50,000-dollar reward than see justice done. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi

King of the Cowboys
The budget for this fine Roy Rogers Western was doubled and the title changed from Starlight on the Trail to the more descriptive King of the Cowboys, mainly due to Rogers' great reception on a personal appearance tour in the fall of 1942. Republic had lost Gene Autry to the war effort and this film, more than any other, brought the heretofore also-ran singing cowboy to the forefront, where he remained through the early '50s. Following the example of Autry, Roy played himself, a rodeo star assigned by the governor, Russell Hicks, to investigate a series of warehouse bombings. With sidekick Frog Millhouse (Smiley Burnette) in tow, Roy infiltrates the Merry Makers, a touring tent show whose phony mind reader, Maurice (Gerald Mohr), is the chief operative for a sabotage ring run by the governor's secretary, Kraly (Lloyd Corrigan). But Maurice catches Roy stealing his book of codes and is about to shoot him in cold blood when tent show owner Dave Mason (James Bush) interferes. Maurice then eliminates Mason and frames Roy for the killing but despite this setback, Roy manages to stop the saboteurs before they can blow up a supply train needed in the war effort. An "everything but the kitchen sink" action-thriller, King of the Cowboys came complete with seven songs performed by Rogers, Burnette, and the Sons of the Pioneers, including "Ride, Ranger, Ride," "Roll Along Prairie Moon," and Johnny Mercer's "I'm an Old Cowhand." The film was restored to its full theatrical length by the Roan Group in the late '90s and re-released on a DVD that also features the original theatrical trailer and alternate scenes from a separate version released only to the War Department. In these scenes, Lloyd Corrigan's character is a businessman rather than the governor's secretary, and his Nazi affiliation is more clearly established. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi

Cast & Crew

  • Image coming soon
    Edward Cassidy - Tom Prescott
  • Image coming soon
    Steven Darrell - Joe Cummings
  • Kenne Duncan
    Kenne Duncan - Brunnigan
  • Dale Evans
    Dale Evans - Jill Delaney
  • George "Gabby" Hayes
    George "Gabby" Hayes - Gabby Whittaker
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