The Best of John Lee Hooker 1965 to 1974 [CD]

  • Artist: John Lee Hooker
  • SKU: 593824
  • Release Date: 03/24/1992
$7.99
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The Best of John Lee Hooker 1965 to 1974 [CD] - Larger Front
The Best of John Lee Hooker 1965 to 1974 [CD]
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  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    A Sampling of One of the Most Prolific Bluesmen

    Posted
    Parkas4Kids
    • My Best Buy® MemberMember

    As a child of the '80s, I missed out on the Blues explosion of the '60s and '70s by a good five years or more. However, that doesn't mean I can't appreciate the music that inspired such prolific guitarists as George Thorogood, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Johnny Winter, and the like. I've been a huge Thorogood fan since my childhood (who doesn't like "Bad to the Bone"?#, and guys like Stevie and Johnny Winter are nothing less than gods on the guitar. But it was guys like John Lee Hooker that gave them the songs that made those men such popular performers. Now, I mentioned the guitarists above because, truth be told, their version of the blues is what I prefer the most. That raw, dirty blending of rock and blues is so visceral that it gets under your skin and into your bones. However, many of those guitarists best songs #in my opinion# were originally penned by The Hook, and it's an interesting study to hear the evolution of George Thorogood's rendition of "One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer," which is actually a medley of several Hooker songs. And while I prefer the Thorogood version to that of The Hook, there are more than a few true hits on this compilation album. My personal favorites are "Never Get out of These Blues Alive," which I first heard on the album of the same name, and on vinyl no less; "Mr. Lucky," which I find funny as so many blues songs come from the standpoint of being anything but; "I'm Bad Like Jesse James #1966/Live at Cafe Au Go Go#," which I'm fairly certain became George Thorogood's "Move on Over" either in whole or at least in part; "The Motor City Is Burning," which is an absolute barn-burner; "Think Twice Before You Go"; and "Bang Bang Bang Bang," which I first became familiar with when the Animals covered it under its original title of "Boom Boom." While I don't necessarily see myself listening to this CD as often as I listen to the like of Mr. Thorogood, Mr. Vaughan, or Mr. Winter, this collection of blues classics is nothing to bat an eyelash at. Without men like John Lee Hooker to blaze the trails they did in their time, we would not have been given the pleasure of such prolific bands as the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, the Beatles, etc. So, if you're sitting at home wondering about the roots of American music, order yourself a copy of this CD and enjoy a shot of bourbon, a glass of scotch, and a beer to chase your blues away.

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