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The George Eliot Collection [5 Discs] [DVD]

SKU:15444486
Release Date:04/17/2007
Rating:
$39.99

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    Overview

    Special Features


    • Middlemarch: A Reader's Guide
    • George Eliot: A Scandalous Life
    • Daniel Deronda: Behind the Scenes Photo Gallery

    Synopsis


    The Mill on the Floss
    Family ties and moral quandaries complicate the romance of an intelligent and attractive young woman in director Ronald Wilson's emotional adaptation of George Eliot's popular novel. A clever lover of the arts whose wit and grace are exceeded only by her striking grace and outward beauty, mill-owner's daughter Maggie Tulliver incurs the wrath of her stubborn father and prosaic brother when she forges a strong but unlikely bond with deformed nearby neighbor Phillip Wakeam. Her secretive relationship bitterly denounced by her disapproving brother, Maggie receives a devastating blow when her father dies of a stroke following a bitter feud with Phillip's father -- a powerful attorney with strong local ties. Upon becoming intimately involved with her cousin Lucy's urbane and handsome fiancée, Maggie's problems elevate from the merely objectionable to the outright scandalous. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

    Silas Marner
    This TV adaptation of George Elliot's 1861 novel Silas Marner was one of the rare single-episode presentations of PBS' Masterpiece Theatre. Ben Kingsley plays Silas Marner, who after being falsely accused of a crime and banished from his own town, becomes a miserly recluse in the small British community of Raveloe. When his precious cache of money is stolen by the town wastrel (Jonathan Coy) Silas can see no reason for going on with life. He is transformed from misanthrope to rehabilitated human being through the love of Eppie, an orphaned child left in his care. Patsy Kensit is featured as the grown-up Eppie. Originally taped in 1985 for the BBC, Silas Marner was first shown in the US on March 15, 1987. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Middlemarch
    Daniel Deronda
    Produced for British television, Daniel Deronda was adapted from George Eliot's final novel, written in 1874 (and first filmed in 1921). As was her habit, Eliot laid bare the hypocrisy and venality of Victorian-era "class culture," at the same time admitting that a certain amount of conformity was necessary if one hoped to survive in a world where nonconformity was not only looked down upon but actively suppressed. Essentially, both the novel and the TV presentation are comprised of two separate stories, linked together by the titular Daniel Deronda (Hugh Dancy), a young man of Jewish heritage. In the main narrative, Daniel is attracted to the spoiled, headstrong Gwendolen Harleth (Romola Garai), who is reluctantly poised to enter into a marriage of convenience with the wealthy, snobbish, and intensely anti-Semitic Henleigh Grancourt (Hugh Bonneville). This romantic intrigue is played against the curious relationship between Daniel and the Zionist visionary Mordecai (Daniel Evans), who tirelessly proselytizes in favor of a permanent homeland for the Jewish people. Things come to a head when Daniel finds himself falling in love with Mordecai's sister Mirah (Jodhi May). Originally telecast in three parts on the BBC beginning December 7, 2002, Daniel Deronda was re-edited as a two-parter for the PBS anthology Masterpiece Theatre, where it first aired on March 30, 2003. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Adam Bede
    Written by George Eliot (of Silas Marner fame), the 1859 novel Adam Bede trenchantly addresses the issues of ingrained social prejudices. Played in this British TV adaptation by Iain Glen, the titular Adam Bede is a humble carpenter, enamored of the beautiful but shallow Hetty Sorel (Patsy Kensit). Surrendering to the "political correctness" of her times, Hetty spurns Adam in favor of a wealthy marriage to a nobleman, Lord Arthur (James Wilby). Though he is deeply hurt by this, Adam never relinquishes his love for Hetty and spends the balance of the story trying to win her back in his own single-minded, diligent fashion. Counterbalancing the romantic melodrama is the calm, good-hearted presence of Adam's erstwhile sweetheart, Dinah Morris (Susannah Harker), perhaps the only character in the novel without an agenda. Adapted for television by Maggie Wadey, Adam Bede made its BBC debut in 1991, then aired as part of the PBS anthology Masterpiece Theatre on March 1, 1992. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Cast & Crew


    • Image coming soon
      Christopher Blake
    • Judy Cornwell
      Judy Cornwell




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