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Superman: The Motion Picture Anthology 1978-2006 (Blu-ray Disc) (Eng/Fre/Spa)

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    Rating Breakdown

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    (4 Reviews)
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    Plot:
    5
    Cinematography:
    5
    Acting:
    4.5
    DVD Extras:
    4.5

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    Ratings & Reviews

    Overall Customer Rating:
    100% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (4 out of 4)

    Rating Breakdown

    100%
    (4 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    0%
    (0 Reviews)
    Plot:
    5
    Cinematography:
    5
    Acting:
    4.5
    DVD Extras:
    4.5

    Special Features

    • Featuring the feature-length You Will Believe: The Cinematic Saga of Superman
    • Look, up in the Sky!
    • The Amazing Story of Superman
    • Informative documentaries
    • Tv specials
    • George reeves in Superman and the Mole-Man
    • The complete fleischer/famous studios 1940s Superman cartoons
    • Filmmakers commentaries
    • Rare tv pilot
    • Featurettes
    • Archival footage

    Synopsis

    Includes:
  • Mechanical Monsters (1941)
  • Superman (1941)
  • Electric Earthquake (1942)
  • Volcano (1942)
  • Japoteurs (1942)
  • Destruction Inc. (1942)
  • Billion Dollar Limited (1942)
  • The Magnetic Telescope (1942)
  • Showdown (1942)
  • The Arctic Giant (1942)
  • Terror on the Midway (1942)
  • The Bulleteers (1942)
  • Eleventh Hour (1942)
  • The Underground World (1943)
  • Super-Rabbit (1943)
  • The Mummy Strikes (1943)
  • Secret Agent (1943)
  • Jungle Drums (1943)
  • Snafuperman (1944)
  • Superman and the Mole Men (1951)
  • Stupor Duck (1956)
  • Superman: The Movie (1978), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Superman II (1980), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Superman III (1983), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987), MPAA Rating: PG
  • Superman Returns (2006), MPAA Rating: PG-13
  • Look, Up in the Sky! The Amazing Story of Superman (2006)
  • You Will Believe: The Cinematic Saga of Superman (2006)
  • Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut (2006), MPAA Rating: PG

    Mechanical Monsters
    The Mechanical Monsters is the second in the famous Fleischer series of Superman cartoons and contains two notable "premieres" -- the first time Superman uses his x-ray vision and the first time Clark Kent uses a phone booth to change into Superman. In this short, Metropolis is the scene of a series of strange crimes. Giant robots, under the control of the Mad Scientist that created them, are robbing establishments of money and jewels. Naturally, the Daily Planet's top reporters, Clark Kent and Lois Lane, are after the story behind these robberies and the mechanical monsters that are perpetrating them. They arrive at the scene of a robbery in progress at a jewelry store; trying to intervene, Lois somehow gets trapped inside one of the robots. Kent makes the switch to the mighty Superman and follows the robots as they make their way back to the scientist's lair, but he gets waylaid by some pesky power lines. While he deals with this distraction, the Mad Scientist discovers Lois, ties her up and plans to get rid of her by pouring a cauldron of molten steel on top of her. Superman arrives with barely a second to spare, rescues the intrepid girl reporter, makes mincemeat of the robots and brings the Mad Scientist to justice. ~ Craig Butler, Rovi

    Superman
    Directed by Dave Fleischer, brother of the legendary Max Fleischer (who serves as producer), this animated short film was the first cinematic adaptation of the classic comic book Superman. Long before George Reeves or Christopher Reeve donned the famous red cape, voice-artist Bud Collyer was Superman, providing the superhero's dialogue in dozens of shorts and television programs over the course of three decades. In this first adventure, Clark Kent must turn into his alter-ego Superman and save the people of Metropolis from certain doom at the hands of a maniacal scientist with a deadly energy cannon. Joan Alexander provides the voice of Lois Lane. ~ Matthew Tobey, Rovi

    Electric Earthquake
    As Electronic Earthquake opens, the viewer sees a strange cable that flows into the harbor near Metropolis. The cable slinks along the harbor to the underwater lair of a brilliant Native American scientist. The scientist visits the Daily Planet, where he demands that Metropolis be returned to his people, who settled there long ago. Editor Perry White refuses to print the scientist's demand, at which point the scientist tells him that he will destroy the city if his demand is not met. He returns to his secret lab, followed by Lois Lane, who smells a good story. Unfortunately, Lois is discovered and captured, and the scientist proceeds with his plan. Utilizing his cable, he sends enormous surges of electricity under the ground, triggering a terrific earthquake. Superman finds the source of the earthquake and breaks the main cable, then begins dismantling various other cables from the lab. This unfortunately causes the lab to start flooding. Superman saves Lois in the nick of time, and succeeds in capturing the evil scientist as well. ~ Craig Butler, Rovi

    Volcano
    There are no volcanoes near the great city of Metropolis, but when word comes that a long-dormant volcano in the South Pacific is headed for a cataclysmic eruption, Daily Planet editor Perry White quickly dispatches ace reporters Lois Lane and Clark Kent to cover the big event. White hopes that the two rivals can put aside their differences and work in tandem, but Lois is not about to give away her chance at a solo byline on a story as big as this. She slyly purloins Clark's press pass. While he goes through the red tape of acquiring another, she takes off for where the action is. And there's a lot of action, as the volcano has entered into its full-strength convulsions. Lois finds herself in mortal danger, trapped aboard an overhead tram, the cables of which are breaking. Meanwhile, Clark has seen that the volcano has blown its top and changes into Superman. The Man of Steel uses his incredible strength and ingenuity to force the lava flow into the sea and away from populated areas, then manages to save Lois and the cable car in the nick of time. ~ Craig Butler, Rovi

    Japoteurs
    The first of the Superman cartoons filmed under the aegis of Famous Studios, Japoteurs begins with a Daily Planet headline letting the audience know that the U.S. has developed the world's largest bomber plane and that it will soon be making a test flight. The paper's top reporters, Clark Kent and Lois Lane, are allowed to take a tour of the plane prior to its flight, and see that, in addition to its other features, it can also serve as an airstrip for launching smaller planes. Lois stows away after the tour is over, but she's not alone -- a number of Japanese spies have also stolen aboard, and they hi-jack the ship soon after it takes off. The spies plan to fly the plane to Tokyo, but Lois manages to radio for help, and Superman flies to the rescue. Upon his arrival, he learns that Lois has captured and the spies threaten to release her from the bomb bay doors if Superman doesn't leave. He obeys, but the spy releases Lois anyway, but Superman saves her. Beaten, the agents have set the controls so that the bomber will crash into Metropolis, but Superman uses his massive strength to catch the plane just in time. ~ Craig Butler, Rovi

    Destruction Inc.
    Going undercover, reporters Clark Kent and Lois Lane investigate the murder of an elderly watchman from the Metropolis Munitions Factory. It turns out that factory owner Jones is the head of a gang of saboteurs, determined to commit various acts of mayhem before blowing up the plant. Stumbling onto the conspirators, Lois goes to great athletic lengths to avoid capture, but is ultimately bound and gagged and stuffed into a torpedo tube, which is then fired at a naval vessel. Looks like it's time for Clark Kent to assume his true identity as Superman and go into action--which he does, and how! ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Billion Dollar Limited
    The third in series of classic Fleischer Superman cartoons, Billion Dollar Limited starts with heavily armed guards keeping watch as a billion dollars of gold is loaded onto a train, to be taken to the mint. Clark Kent is also at the station, bidding farewell to fellow reporter Lois Lane, who has won the prize of accompanying the train to its destination and writing a story about the trip. As Kent leaves, he is almost swideswiped by a strange looking car. Inside the car is a gang of masked thugs, intent on getting that gold for themselves. In their technologically advanced car, they are capable of catching up with the train, and several sneak on board. They quickly turn loose the car that contains most of the guards, then climb over the train cars to the engine and seek to gain control of it. Lois, hearing noises, travels to the engine, just after the engineer and his assailant fall from the car. Lois grabs a machine gun left behind by one of the crooks and opens fire on the still-pursuing car, then tries to control the train, with little success. Kent, reading over the wire about the danger to the train, changes into Superman and flies off to the rescue. He saves the train from being diverted into a carload of TNT and rescues it as it falls off of a bridge dynamited by the gangsters. Although he almost succumbs to a tremendous load of tear gas, he finds the strength to overcome the villains and deliver the train to its final destination. ~ Craig Butler, Rovi

    The Magnetic Telescope
    An excited astronomer presents to the world his new creation, a magnetic telescope that exerts tremendous pull upon objects in outer space. Daily Planet reporters Lois Lane and Clark Kent, along with Planet editor Perry White are present at the initial presentation, and witness how the telescope succeeds in capturing a meteor and altering its path. Unfortunately, the telescope cannot adequately control the meteor, and fragments plummet down upon the city of Metropolis. The astronomer is forbidden to continue his experiments, for fear that greater destruction could come, but the stubborn scientist refuses to listen and tries to next capture a passing comet. The police try to thwart his efforts by disrupting the telescope's power supply, but it is too late -- the comet is now on a collision course with Earth. While Lois calls for help, Clark slips away and changes into Superman. The comet is too powerful for even the Man of Steel to send back into space on his own, but by welding together the telescope's power source and reversing its polarity, Superman is able to force the comet back into space and save the day once again. ~ Craig Butler, Rovi

    Showdown
    Can it be true that Superman has become an outlaw? Actually, it's a petty thief named Severn, who wears a Superman costume while committing various robberies, but the police don't know that. Reporters Lois Lane and (especially!) Clark Kent are anxious to prove Superman's innocence, but instead they're assigned to cover the opening night at the Metropolis Opera House. As luck would have it, the phony Superman picks this very moment to steal jewelry from the various operagoers--prompting Clark to discard his rented tuxedo, don cape and tights as the REAL Superman, and settle accounts with his larcenous lookalike. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    The Arctic Giant
    Explorers near the North Pole make a startling discovery: a perfectly preserved prehistoric dinosaur-like animal, frozen in ice. This invaluable discovery is brought to Metropolis, where the experts at the city's museum can study it more closely. Lois Lane, a reporter with a nose for news, is of course on the scene. Although she's all business, the engineer to whom she is speaking gets distracted by her shapely gams as she climbs the stairs in front of him. Not noticing what he is doing, he sets his oil can down precariously on a ledge; it gets knocked off into the engine which controls the museum's freezing unit and knocks the unit out altogether. The engineers work to restore power quickly, before the temperature rises and the ice surrounding the monster melts -- but to no avail. Freed from centuries in his frozen prison, the giant goes on a rampage throughout Metropolis. Fortunately, Superman is quickly on the scene, and although he gets sidetracked rescuing Lois -- who is determined to be in on the action so that she gets the best story -- he eventually defeats the reptile and all turns out well. ~ Craig Butler, Rovi

    Terror on the Midway
    The last of the Superman cartoons produced by the actual Fleischer studios, Terror on the Midway opens as reporter Clark Kent drops his friendly rival Lois Lane off at the circus. On assignment, Lois heads into the big top, ready to enjoy her work and relax. Unfortunately, a mischievous monkey has managed to unlock the cage that holds a ferocious gorilla. The gorilla makes its way into the big top, where it begins terrorizing the crowd and the performers. Although its handlers are quick on the scene, it overpowers them and continues wreaking havoc, forcing the audience to flee. Lois, seeing a little girl trapped, tries to rescue her, but ends up focusing the rampaging ape's attention on them both. Fortunately, Clark has heard about the melee, and changes to Superman. After subduing some other animals that have escaped in the fracas, he is attracted by Lois's scream. She has climbed a pole to escape the ape, but he is still advancing toward her, even as a fire rages around them. Superman rescues her just as the pole is falling, and subdues the ape into the bargain. ~ Craig Butler, Rovi

    The Bulleteers
    The city of Metropolis is under siege by a nefarious group of terrorists that go by the moniker of the Bulleteers (because of their innovative Bulletcar). They've already struck some of the city's famous landmarks and the utility stations that are part of its lifeblood. Now they are making their demands known: Metropolis has 48 hours to hand over the city Treasury. If the city refuses, they will bring ruin upon Metropolis. The Mayor says that their demands are totally unreasonable and absolutely refuses to comply, prompting the terrorists to launch their attack (targeting the Daily Planet for special abuse). This prompts Lois Lane to take off after them, hoping for a scoop, and it prompts Superman to engage them in a final battle, during which he succeeds in destroying the mighty Bulletcar, capturing all of the Bulleteers and saving (once again) both Lois and the entire city of Metropolis. ~ Craig Butler, Rovi

    Eleventh Hour
    The year is 1942, America is at war with Japan, and American reporters Clark Kent and Lois Lane are under house arrest in a Yokohama hotel. Unbeknownst to Lois, Clark manages to elude his captors every night at 11 PM--at which time he assumes his true identity as Superman in order to commit various acts of sabotage against the enemy. Certain that the Americans are responsible for this michief, the Japanese High Command sentences Lois to death by firing squad if another ship or munitions plant is destroyed--and now Superman must figure out how to rescue Lois while simulatenously accomplishing his deadly mission. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    The Underground World
    The offices of the Daily Planet are visited by a man named Henderson. He tells the assembled that he is an explorer, as is his father, who has been missing for some time. Henderson wants to launch an expedition into the deep, mysterious caverns that his father was exploring when he disappeared, and he wants the Planet to finance it. Reporters Lois Lane and Clark Kent join the adventurer, with Lois to travel immediately with him down a river into the caverns, and Clark to join them via a separate boat. Lois and Henderson find land and disembark, but their boat slips away and crashes into a cavern wall, where it explodes. They are then captured by some fierce creatures, half-bird, half-man, who plan to sacrifice them by throwing them into a pit of fire. Clark, who had heard the earlier explosion, discovers what is going on and switches to his alter ego, Superman. Superman quickly mops up the birdmen, saves Lois and Henderson, and seals up the caverns leading to the birdmen's land. At the end of the film, editor Perry White burns Lois and Clark's story, saving he can't print it because it is too unbelievable. ~ Craig Butler, Rovi

    Super-Rabbit
    Instilled with incredible superpowers after consuming a fortified rabbit specially engineered by the brilliant Professor Canafrazz, Bugs Bunny dashes off to confront the notorious rabbit killer Cottontail Smith, soaring through the clouds with the greatest of ease, and making a complete mockery of the Texas gunslinger by surviving everything from a hail of bullets to a cannonball blast. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

    The Mummy Strikes
    As The Mummy Strikes opens, Miss Hogan, assistant to noted scientist Dr. Jordan, finds the doctor's dead body in the Metropolis Egyptian Museum, a syringe nearby. Miss Hogan is accused of murder and found guilty. After her trial, Daily Planet reporter Clark Kent is contacted by Dr. Wilson from the museum, who says he has evidence to clear Hogan. Kent goes to the museum, secretly followed by Lois Lane, who eavesdrops on their conversation. Wilson explains that he has translated some heiroglyphics Jordan had been working on and that he believes Jordan had injected an "elixir of life" into the four mummified guards that surround the coffin of King Tush, and then had tried to open the King's coffin, thereby bringing down upon himself the Tush curse. When Kent tries to open the coffin, he finds that doing so releases a poisoned needle, which must have killed the doctor. It also brings the King's guards back to life, and they promptly attack Jordan and Lois. Kent switches to Superman and makes short work of them ,and the film ends with the news that Hogan has been released. ~ Craig Butler, Rovi

    Secret Agent
    En route to a humdrum assignment, reporter Clark Kent is caught in the crossfire between Nazi agents and a beautiful blonde American counterspy. The girl has a cache of valuable documents in her possession, and the Nazis are determined to prevent her from delivering the papers to Washington. Though captured by the enemy spies, Clark manages to burst full-force into his true identity as Superman, racing to the female agent's rescue as she faces certain death on a sabotaged bridge. Bud Collyer does not provide the voices of Clark Kent and Superman in this episode, which may explain why the "two" characters only have one line of dialogue between them (Some historian believe that this line was delivered by Sam Parker, who'd voiced the title role in Fleischer's Gulliver's Travels). ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Jungle Drums
    A military plane carrying American Army lieutenant Fleming and reporter Lois Lane crashes in the jungles of darkest Africa. Before he dies, Fleming entrusts a packet valuable documents to Lois, warning her that the papers must not fall into enemy hands. Unfortunately, Lois is promptly captured by a tribe of hostile natives, led by a "white god" who is actually a Nazi agent in disguise. Rushing to Lois' rescue, Superman is faced with the triple dilemma of recovering the documents, destroying a convoy of Nazi submarines and preventing the plucky girl reporter from being burned at the stake. Don't miss the closing scene with a disgruntled Hitler listening to a robust rendition of Frank Loesser's "Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition". ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Snafuperman
    Transformed into Snafuperman by Technical Fairy, First Class, bumbling Private Snafu uses his newfound superpowers to defeat the Nazis, but only manages to display his complete incompetence in the process. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

    Superman and the Mole Men
    Superman, the comic-book "Man of Steel" created in 1938 by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, made his feature-film debut in Lippert's Superman and the Mole Men. The story takes place in the small town of Silsby, where the local oil company is drilling what will become the world's deepest well. When the drillers reach the six-mile point, the results are astonishing: four subterranean Mole Men (Jack Banbury, Billy Curtis, Jerry Marvin and Tony Barvis) emerge from the well. Though basically harmless, the Mole Men are regarded as a threat by the citizens of Silsby, especially lynch-happy Luke Benson (Jeff Corey). Reporters Clark Kent (George Reeves) and Lois Lane (Phyllis Coates) arrive in town to do a story on the well. When Kent realizes that the Mole Men are in danger of falling victim to mob violence, he tears off his glasses and street clothes to become Superman. In this guise, he endeavors to rescue the Mole Men and to convince the townsfolk that blind prejudice is both stupid and dangerous. Rather mild by today's standards (the audience never gets to see Superman fly), Superman and the Mole Men served its primary purpose: to act as a theatrical pilot for the very popular Superman TV series, which also starred Reeves and (for the first season, at least) Coates. The feature film was later edited into two half-hour installments of the Superman series, and retitled "The Unknown People." ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Stupor Duck
    Another of director Bob McKimson's TV satires, this one is a broad "Superman" spoof with Daffy Duck in the dual role of mild-mannered reporter Cluck Trent and that "strange being from another planet" Stupor Duck. Overhearing the sinister schemes of evil Russian saboteur I. Aardvark Ratnik, Cluck Trent ducks into a closet (located in the McKimson Building, naturally) and emerges as Stupor Duck, intent upon seeking out and neutralizing the bad guy--never once figuring out that "Ratnik" is nothing more than a character on a radio soap opera. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

    Superman: The Movie
    Richard Donner's big-budget blockbuster Superman: The Movie is an immensely entertaining recounting of the origin of the famous comic book character. Opening on Krypton (where Marlon Brando plays Superman's father), the film follows the Man of Steel (Christopher Reeve) as he's sent to Earth where he develops his alter-ego Clark Kent and is raised by a Midwestern family. In no time, the movie has run through his teenage years, and Clark gets a job at the Daily Planet, where he is a news reporter. It's there that he falls in love with Lois Lane (Margot Kidder), who is already in love with Superman. But the love story is quickly sidetracked once the villainous Lex Luthor (Gene Hackman) launches a diabolical plan to conquer the world and kill Superman. Superman: The Movie is filled with action, special effects and a surprising amount of humor. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

    Superman II
    Between giving up his super powers, confronting criminals from outer space, and having problems with his girlfriend, it's a bad time to be the Man of Steel in this sequel to the 1978 blockbuster. When terrorists threaten to destroy Paris with a thermonuclear device as they hold reporter Lois Lane (Margot Kidder) hostage, Superman (Christopher Reeve) comes to the rescue and flings the weapon into space. However, its blast outside the earth's orbit awakens Zod (Terence Stamp), Ursa (Sarah Douglas), and Non (Jack O'Halloran), three villains from Superman's home planet of Krypton who were exiled to outer space for their crimes. Zod and his partners arrive on Earth and use their powers in a bid to take over the U.S., and then the world. However, when Lois realizes that mild mannered Clark Kent and Superman are actually the same person, he brings her to his Fortress of Solitude, where his decision to marry Lois costs him his remarkable strength. Without his super powers, how can Superman vanquish Zod and save the world? Gene Hackman, Ned Beatty, Susannah York, and Jackie Cooper return from the first film, which was shot at the same time as parts of the sequel. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

    Superman III
    In a major departure from the tone of the preceding two Superman adventure films, this mix of vile deeds and fantasy heroics drops the "S" out of cosmic and goes for comic instead. Right at the starting gate, Gus Gorman (Richard Pryor) and a subsequent slapstick sequence upstage (Christopher Reeves again), who later develops an identity crisis. Gorman, newly trained as a computer whiz, starts working for a conglomerate run by the corporate nemesis Ross Webster (Robert Vaughn), intent on world domination. Gorman is sent to Superman's small town of Smallville to wipe out Columbia's coffee crop by fiddling with the computer side of a weather satellite. Clark Kent is in town for his class reunion, leading Superman to clash with Gorman, which in turn, leads Gorman to develop a hybrid red Kryptonite. Unwittingly, since Gorman's wits are always in doubt, the Red Kryptonite causes Superman to split into a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde schizophrenia -- but in two separate bodies. As the evil Superman swaggers around town, megalomaniac Ross Webster has other tricks in mind -- and in one of the more memorable action scenes (interspersed with a video game sequence), Superman is chased through the Grand Canyon by a fast-flying, very determined missile. Lana Lang (Annette O'Toole) is on hand for romantic interest (Margot Kidder only appears briefly -- she was growing tired of Lois Lane). ~ Eleanor Mannikka, Rovi

    Superman IV: The Quest for Peace
    Superman (Christopher Reeve) tries to save the world from nuclear destruction at the hands of Lex Luthor (Gene Hackman) in this action film featuring the man of steel. In a speech to the United Nations, Superman declares he will rid the world of all nuclear weapons. Arch-villain Luthor emerges from prison obsessed with killing Superman and creates an adversary known as Nuclear Man (Mark Pillow). The two engage in a fight to the finish in various landmarks on Earth before taking their battle into outer space. When Lois Lane (Margot Kidder) invites both Superman and Clark Kent to a double-date dinner, Superman's powers are tested so that both men can be present. Jackie Cooper plays the gruff veteran newspaper editor Perry White, with Marc McClure as Jimmy Olsen. Sam Wanamaker plays tabloid tycoon David Warfield, the millionaire who buys the Daily Planet. Mariel Hemmingway is Warfield's daughter Lacy, Clark Kent's date at Lois' luxury apartment. This is the least interesting of the four Superman movies starring Christopher Reeve. ~ Dan Pavlides, Rovi

    Superman Returns
    The Man of Steel returns to the big screen with this continuation of the icon's film legacy that picks up after the events of the first two Christopher Reeve films. Some time has passed since the events of Superman II and the world has gotten used to life without Superman (Brandon Routh) ever since his puzzling disappearance years earlier. Upon his return, he finds a Metropolis that doesn't need him anymore, while Lois Lane (Kate Bosworth) has moved on with another young suitor Richard White (James Marsden) in the meantime. As the hero begins to tackle the fact that life on Earth has continued without him, he is forced to face his old arch-nemesis Lex Luthor (Kevin Spacey) and restore the life that was once his. Directed by Bryan Singer from a script by the writing team of X-Men 2, Superman Returns marks a return to the screen for the man in tights, whose production history has seen many failed attempts including a famous near-miss from Tim Burton and Kevin Smith with Nicolas Cage in the lead role, along with another from director McG and writer J.J. Abrams (Lost). Singer eventually won the prestigious gig when he pitched the idea to not tackle the origin story again, but continue with director Richard Donner's original vision. ~ Jeremy Wheeler, Rovi

    Look, Up in the Sky! The Amazing Story of Superman
    From the comic book to the silver screen and beyond, few superheroes have left such a lasting impression on the fantasy-loving masses as mild-mannered "Daily Planet"-reporter-turned-high-flying-bulletproof-do-gooder Superman. In this documentary set to celebrate the release of X-Men director Bryan Singer's 2006 film Superman Returns, the exciting history of the Man of Steel is told through interviews and archival footage of past Superman films, television shows, and comics. A special sneak preview of newly released footage from Superman Returns ensured that fans received a comprehensive history of their favorite caped crusader that led right up to the release of the highly anticipated film. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

    You Will Believe: The Cinematic Saga of Superman
    No synopsis available.

    Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut
    Reconstructed using archival film and sound elements long thought to be extinct, this special cut of Superman II pieces together unseen footage shot by Richard Donner in order to present the most comprehensive version of what was to be the original cut of the blockbuster sequel. As initially planned, the first two films were to be filmed back-to-back using the same sets and actors to save on production costs. However, with a budget escalating out of control and Warner Bros. breathing down the producers' necks, the decision was made to drop any further filming on the sequel in order to finish the first movie and usher it into theaters. Of course, the first Superman was a wild success, so then it was just a matter of ramping up production again, though this time, Donner was not asked back. Instead, producers went with Richard Lester, who had served them well with his Three Musketeers films. Decisions were made to drop most of the key scenes that were already in the can, including all of the footage featuring Marlon Brando as Jor-El, the Man of Steel's father. After completion, the sequel found much success in theatrical and home-video box-office returns, though that didn't stop die-hard fans from speculating what Donner's cut would have looked like. Once the Internet was spawned, Warner Bros. saw interest grow more and more for this alternate version, even prompting the company to send cease and desist letters to individuals who had posted a re-edit of the film using deleted footage taken from an alternate TV version from the U.K. With the release of Superman Returns, the company saw this as a chance to finally deliver what people had wanted for years and enlisted Michael Thau to oversee the restoration process. Under the tutelage of Donner's notes, scripts, storyboards, and the director himself, the new version was delivered to home audiences in 2006, thereby not only giving people a look into what could have been, but giving a director an unprecedented chance to realize a vision long thought lost in the annals of movie history. ~ Jeremy Wheeler, Rovi

  • Cast & Crew

    • Christopher Reeve
      Christopher Reeve - Clark Kent/Superman
    • Gene Hackman
      Gene Hackman - Lex Luthor
    • Margot Kidder
      Margot Kidder - Lois Lane
    • Ned Beatty
      Ned Beatty - Otis
    • Jackie Cooper
      Jackie Cooper - Dino/Perry White
    Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.