Linksys - MAX-STREAM™ AC1900 Dual Band Repeater with MU-MIMO - White

Prevent dead zones around your home with the help of this Linksys Wi-Fi range extender. It works with all types of Wi-Fi routers, and it uses multi-user MIMO for speed and efficiency. This Linksys Wi-Fi range extender can be used to create a different access point or to extend the field of the router’s connection.
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Overview

What's Included


  • MAX-STREAM AC1900 Wireless-ac Dual Band Repeater with MU-MIMO
  • Owner's Manual

Ratings & Reviews


Overall Customer Rating:
91% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (845 out of 938)

Features


MU-MIMO

MU-MIMO for faster and more efficient throughput to every MU-MIMO connected device.

Up to 10,000 sq.-ft. range

Extend the range of your wireless router up to 10,000 square feet, eliminating dead zones.

Spot Finder Technology

Easy to use, mobile-guided range extender setup to extend Wi-Fi range throughout your home.

Works with any router

Works with any wireless router including your service provider's router.

Cross-band technology

Maximizes the simultaneous use of both bands for high-speed data transfer and uninterrupted streaming and gaming.

Simultaneous dual band (2.4 + 5 GHz)

Delivers a stronger connection at a wider range than a single band at speeds up to AC1900.

Beamforming technology

Optimizes performance by focusing wireless signal to connected devices.

Gigabit ethernet port

Connect a wired device such as a gaming console, Blu-ray player, Smart TV, or streaming player to your Wi-Fi network.


Customer rating

4.4
91%
would recommend to a friend

Pros

Cons

  • Just follow the included instructions and you will have it up and running in no time -Extended the range significantly and there are almost no "dead zones" in the house -The admin interface is very easy to use -The app is very easy to use and helps with the placement of the router Cons: -Sometime there is random interference where the signal drops - Pricing might be an issue since it's a bit on the high endchiron09
    See all reviews that mention interference as a con
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Crazy Range! Excellent Coverage

    Posted
    Dragonhunter281
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
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    The Linksys RE 7000 Range Extender has been a real treat to use. Our Wi-Fi has been an issue for a while with horrible range coverage and speed inconsistencies so I was excited to finally test this. Setup is fairly straightforward and I am confident that most can set this up without any difficulty. The RE 7000 Linksys Range extender can be used in one of two ways: wired or wirelessly. The wired method involves connecting an Ethernet from your modem/router to the bottom of the RE7000, which then plugs in to the wall. The wired method is recommended as opposed to the wireless since it creates an access point directly from your source, thus providing maximum speed. The wireless method uses your Wi-Fi signal to talk to the range extender, and increases the range; however the speed will be less as you have to rely on an increased latency between your device to the extender then back to your original Wi-Fi signal. I tested both methods and while coverage did improve with the wireless method, our results were still inconsistent because our Wi-Fi built into our modem is inconsistent. I want to add if your connection is fast enough, either method will suit your needs, but my recommendation, as well as Linksys's recommendation, is to go in expecting to use the wired method. All my results shown here will be using the wired method as they represent what the RE7000 was designed to do: Increased range and fast, consistent speed. In addition, the WPS button on the RE7000 also worked as designed when connecting my phone and our Sony TV upstairs to the extender. I would try both methods if any problems should arise. Setup is done primarily through the web browser interface, but you can also connect via the IP address they give you for a manual based install. I did the web-based method as most will choose that way and surprisingly the interface is straightforward. After you create an admin password, it takes you to the settings. For each of the two Wi-Fi frequencies, 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz, they are split into separate access points, which can be enabled or disabled depending on your preference. On the wireless installation, your access point may use the same name as your old router but will add "_EXT" at the end of it. Likewise, you can always customize your SSID. As for any issues, the only one I ran into was after I had restored the RE7000 to factory settings, my Acer Iconia One tablet kept asking for the admin password that had been erased every time I tried to load the extender web address. I bypassed this by using the IP number used for manual setup; it redirected me back to the welcome screen. If that doesn't work, try clearing the browser cookies and cache. I would also recommend copy the welcome screen's URL during your first initial setup just in case you will need to start over. Above all, be patient, as networking sometimes requires you to redo things, often times working after the tenth time. In our house, we have had many Wi-Fi issues over the last year or so; mainly inconsistent speeds and coverage was nearly nonexistent if you were anywhere other than directly above the study, upstairs directly above the router or actually in the study. However, using the wired method with the RE7000, our range increased dramatically and the consistency was a HUGE improvement. Essentially, the second half of our house that previously had no Wi-Fi coverage before now had full bars and a strong consistent 18-22 MBPS download and 2.5 upload. In my room, with the door shut, the range extender provided full bars of coverage when before it was average even with the door left open. The range improved so much that places that would see very poor signal strength now had almost nearly full coverage! My room saw the biggest jump over the inconsistent numbers found on the old Wi-Fi in comparison to the strong consistent signal using the range extender. Using the same test server, I noted: Old Router (Pass 1) 8.28 MB Download/ 2.11 MB Upload/ 34 ms Old Router (Pass 2) 3.27 MB Download/0.66 MB Upload/34 ms RE7000 (Pass 1) 22.07 MB Download/2.37 MB Upload/33 ms RE7000 (Pass 2) 22.24 MB Download/2.30 MB Upload/33 ms In the dining room, I noted the results using an AE3000 Linksys USB Adapter connected to my newly built desktop. I noted the results below: Old Router: 6.00 MB Download/1.71 MB Upload/23 ms RE7000: 22.85 MB Download/1.93 MB Upload/22 ms As you can see, the RE 7000 performance is absolutely stunning and the consistency has drastically improved. Even places that still have only average bars are so much faster and smooth because our old modem simply could not handle the square footage of our home. In essence, if you need to improve your range and do not mind using the wired connection (perhaps you have a way to hide the cable) then this is absolutely recommended. Wirelessly, I caution to make sure your source is fast and consistent; once done, the RE7000 will tremendously improve your range of the signal. In fact, picking up the device in the backyard was mind bottling! I would like to mention that when you pair this range extender with compatible Max Stream Linksys Routers (EA7500/9500), the range extender will automatically detect this feature during setup. Next, a message will pop up noting that it will streamline the setup and that it recommends using the same settings used on the main network for a seamless experience. I tested this using the wireless method with my EA9500, since this would be the method you would use to activate such a feature. Thus, because of this, I cannot comment if this would work by using a wired connection from the router to the RE7000 but I imagine it would and thus provide a better experience. Anyways, once connected, on Wi-Fi devices you will not see what physical device you are connected to: both the RE7000 and whichever router used will appear under the same SSID. On extremely fast connections, where delay would be nonexistent, I assume this would be a nice experience, but on slower ones, like ours, I was noticing some spikes in latency and inconsistent numbers once again. Granted, they were not as wild as they were before. Conclusively, your connection will alter your experience here. Personally, I would prefer to see the two access points created by the RE7000, as well as those from the router so I know what I am connected to. Overall, it is a nice feature depending on your preference and connection. The RE7000 Range extender is an amazing product that I have no doubt will improve your wireless experience no matter which method used to setup. With my precautions, it has the chance to drastically improve your networking needs; much like it did when I used it with an Ethernet cable. The range and performance is definitely there. At its cost, it could prove quite drastically the most effective way to improve your range and access to Wi-Fi, especially in large or multistory houses. I would recommend that if you are purchasing this, check to see if you have the ability to use this with a wired connection. If you do, then I have no doubt you will be pleased like I have been. If you need to use the wireless feature, I still recommend this, but like before I caution that your results will drastically vary depending on your source connection, location of the extender, and your household construction. Fast connections should have no problem, but slower ones may experience some interruption or increased latency, as we are more prone to "feel" it when we do not have access to our full consistent speed. Overall the RE7000 is highly recommended and certainly performs like a five star product!

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Extends Range Nicely, But There's a Cost

    Posted
    ryanmcv
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    In large homes, a Wi-Fi signal will inevitably degrade as it travels through walls and other sources of interference. I was eager to test the Linksys RE7000 in a 4-bedroom house where the 2 farthest bedrooms have always had spotty Wi-Fi coverage. The range of my network has certainly been extended, but there are a few quirks and drawbacks that buyers should be aware of. Put simply: If you currently use a Linksys Max-Stream router, set-up and use of this range extender will be much smoother. Regardless of the brand of your router, there may be a noticeable degradation in overall network speeds when using this extender. Read on for my full experience. BACKGROUND - My current router is a Linksys Max-Stream EA7500, which currently broadcasts two signals and SSIDs: one for 2.4 GHz and one for 5 GHz. - The router and extender are used in a 2-story, 4-bedroom home. The router is centrally located on the bottom floor. The two bedrooms directly above it have always received a great Wi-Fi signal, even without the extender. The other 2 bedrooms on the far side of the house have spotty reception, at best - particularly on the 5 GHz band. - The installation guide offers two methods for configuring this extender: using the WPS buttons on the extender and your router (if equipped); or using a browser-based utility that will allow for more configuration options. GOOD: - Setup is relatively easy, but I would highly recommend using the browser-based setup rather than the WPS buttons. The browser-based utility will tell you whether or not you've placed the extender in an ideal location (Linksys calls this "Spot Finder"). If you have a dual-band network like I do, you can choose which bands you want to extend (both 2.4 and 5 GHz, or just one of them). After following the step-by-step instructions, the light on the extender will turn a solid green, indicating that you're good to go. Just make sure that Spot Finder utility indicates that the extender is in a "Just Right" location -- This will typically be about midway between the router and the areas where Wi-Fi is weak or non-existent. - Because I have a Linksys Max-Stream router, the new, extended network uses the same name/SSID as my main network. So when looking at the lists of available networks on my devices, I still see only my two SSIDs: one for 2.4 GHz; one for 5 GHz. Linksys calls this "seamless roaming." - In my case, the range of my network has certainly improved. The 2 bedrooms that previously had a weak signal now show full bars on both 2.4 and 5 GHz bands. Without the extender, YouTube videos and complex webpages would take several minutes to fully load. Now, videos and webpages load at acceptable/normal speeds. BAD: - I couldn't complete setup using the WPS buttons. I tried three times, but the light kept blinking orange (indicating an error). Luckily the browser-based setup (described above) seems to be the better option, anyways. - If you have a non-Linksys router, your extended network will be identified using "_Ext" at the end of your main network name. Not a huge issue, but you'll have to reconfigure your devices to connect to the "_Ext" network when you're out of range of your main network. - Speeds on the extended network are noticeably slower compared to the main, non-extended network. I ran several speed tests -- my Internet download speed drops from 150 mbps on the main network (the max provided by my ISP) to only about 75 mbps on the extended network. The speeds fluctuate greatly, but I have yet to achieve anything higher than 80 mbps on the extended network. Latency has also increased -- ping times (using speedtest.net) are around 45 milliseconds on the extended network, compared to 10 milliseconds on the main network. - Even as I move away from the range extender, my devices stay connected to the slower, extended network for some time before they finally jump back over to the main, faster network. This will, of course, vary by device, but it can be frustrating when you're within feet of the router and expect full download speeds. Usually turning a device's Wi-Fi off and then on again will force it to connect to the main network. OVERALL: For my purposes, the RE7000 range extender does its job and succeeds in blanketing my entire house with a usable Wi-Fi signal. However, I'm slightly disappointed that my overall Wi-Fi network speeds have taken a hit. If you need maximum Internet speeds in all areas of your house, then this might not be the right solution. But if you're just looking for a way to be able to browse the web or stream videos in areas where Wi-Fi is hard to reach, then give this a look.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Best AC Wireless Extender with MU-MIMO feature

    Posted
    Selva
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    This is world first AC wireless range extender with MU-MIMO feature from Linksys displayed at CES 2016. I am extremely pleased with this purchase and wireless extender performance. I am not a big fan of wireless extender and this one changed my assumptions. I had some dead spots at my 2800 feet home (especially second floor) and this extender resolved all the issues. This is one the fastest wireless extender in the market delivering superior Wifi speed. Before the setup, the wireless speed was only 30 mbps / 10 mbps download / upload speed. After the setup, I am getting 225mbps / 33 mbps in second floor which is unbelievable speed. The setup was very easy and configured dual band wireless (2.4Ghz and 5Ghz) less than 5 mins. This extender works with any existing wireless router and I have configured this extender with Netgear Nighthawk X8 router. If your router supports WPS mode, setup can be done quickly for dual bands or you can use the browser to configure the extender. By default, it will create new SSIDs for 2.4 Ghz and 5 Ghz. If you would like to use the same name as your existing SSID, you can change it in configuration page after the initial setup. This extender has many excellent features. The most useful features are the beam forming and the cross band technology features. This is the first extender supports MU-MIMO feature. It has 1 Gigabit Ethernet port which can be used for wired network. Wi-Fi speed is unbelievable in 2nd floor and speed tests delivered more than 225mbps on Galaxy Note 5 phone. With wired connection my results around 360mbps download and 35mbps upload. I have listed some of the technical specifications and features for this AC wireless extender • Wi-Fi Technology: AC1900+ MU-MIMO • Key Features: o Multi-User MIMO and Seamless Roaming for faster and more efficient throughput - Next-generation MU-MIMO (Multi-User, Multiple-Input, Multiple-Output) technology ensures your network can deliver faster and more efficient throughput to every MU-MIMO connected device. This means your whole household can surf the Internet, stream HD movies, play online games, and more simultaneously--without annoying buffering or lag. o Supports two Wi-Fi modes, to extend router's connection or create a new Wi-Fi access point o Works with all Wi-Fi routers o Easy setup with WPS and Spot Finder Technology o Eliminate Dead Zones and Boost Wi-Fi range. Extend your home Wi-Fi to hard-to-reach locations in your home such as your backyard, garage, or bedroom so you can get the Wi-Fi to smartphones, iPads, tablets, and laptops to enjoy streaming HD movies, online gaming, social media, and more. o Seamless Roaming - No more dropped connections for voice calls from iPhone, iPads, smartphones, or tablets when you move from one room to another or to your backyard when synced with a Linksys MAX-STREAM Router or other supported routers. o Dual Bands for Faster speed and reliability - The range extender offers dual wireless bands of 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz for combined speeds of up to 1.9 Gbps--double the performance of single band. Newer Wireless-AC devices are routed to the higher-speed 5 GHz band, while older wireless-N and G devices utilize the 2.4 GHz band. o Cross Band Technology to maximize simultaneous use of both bands for high speed connection o Beamforming Technology to focus the Wi-Fi Signal directly to your smartphone, tablet, and laptop for faster Wi-Fi connection o Spot Finder Technology for best placement o Works with Any router • Network Standards: o 802.11ac o 802.11n o 802.11a/g o 802.11b • Wi-Fi Speed: AC1900 (N300 + AC1733) • Wi-Fi Bands: Simultaneous Dual band, 2.4 Ghz + 5 Ghz • Wi-Fi Range: 10,000 SQ FT • Number of Ethernet Ports: 1x Gigabit It is one of the best and fastest wireless extender in the market. If you are looking for faster internet and longer Wi-Fi range, please go and grab this extender from the stores.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 2 out of 5 stars

    Standard range extender with some software issues

    Posted
    CraigB
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    I purchased this extender to address a particular problem. My house is long and the internet enters on one end. This means my wireless router doesn’t reach the opposite end very well. Signal strength is good but speed drops noticeably. I was hoping for this to compliment my EA9500 as it was said to be designed specifically for this router. In the end what I have come up with is a mixed bag. For the far end of the house my speed has definitely improved. The problem is it has done so at the expense of speed in the middle. The actual router itself has excellent speed and good range. Without the extender I can achieve over 300Mbps in the center of the house. With the range extender, the highest I regularly achieve is 200Mbps. The problem is this range extender, even when paired with the router it is designed for cuts the original speed in half. I have a 400Mbps internet. Directly connected to the primary WiFi I can get 376Mbps, on the WiFi. When the extender is involved it uses half the bands for a return signal effectively cutting any speed in half. This would be fine if the range extender only did this at the far end of the house. The problem is that in the middle sometimes the signal strength is stronger from the extender by just a little compared to the router and so I end up losing speed. I would push the extender further out but the signal strength to the extender is too poor. This brings me to another issue, the configuration. The box says it has an easy way to determine signal strength leading to believe there is some sort of meter on the outside of the unit. There is not. In fact you have to manually log into the unit to see signal strength. The problem with this is the documentation for setup isn’t the greatest. Once the instructions were sorted out another issue is that sometimes during the initial setup it just doesn’t connect to the source router but you can’t be sure if it is not connecting or just slow. The instructions tell you if you are extending a compatible router you can keep the same WiFi name but instructions are vague on how to do this. They mostly point you to using WPS. From what I can tell this can only extend 1 2.4GHz and 1 5GHz network and the companion router actually provides a total of 4, two primary and two guests. I wasn’t able to figure out if it actually extends the guest networks but reading the documentation I am led to believe it does not. There is a possible workaround to the speed issue is to use this as a hardwired extender as it has an Ethernet port. The far side of my house, like most, doesn’t have Ethernet as this point so I couldn’t test but from what I can tell it doesn’t exactly extend the WiFi when hardwired so much as create a _EXT WiFi. This means if you have a WiFi called MyHouse then the extender will create another called MyHouse_EXT. Again I didn’t have a way to try this but that isn’t exactly seamless roaming. Currently I have the extender paired to my router via WiFi. The WPS failed for me so I had to use the password method. The instructions don’t tell you but when pairing with a compatible router you enter the password for the WiFi you are extending. In regards to reliability it has been a mixed bag. I have had some power issues lately so I can’t blame everything on the extender but I have had to reset it at least 5 times in about 2 weeks. Sometimes everything will look ok but I just can’t browse the internet. I reset the extender and everything is good again. In the end it has been helpful and I am hoping if I can get a cable to the other side of the house it might be more helpful. At this point I have mixed feelings about this unit. All in all though this unit is still new and nearly every grip of mine can be fixed by future firmware upgrades which it doesn’t automatically. I’m hoping that it will improve over time. Pros Does extend range Improves speed in distant areas When paired wirelessly with a compatible router it offers seamless roaming Clutter free case with no external antennas means it can be installed in the open without getting snagged or bringing attention to itself Brings up a warning webpage if the main WiFi is not accessible making troubleshooting quicker. You know you have to reset your router instead of the extender. Can be wired or hardwired Can act as an affordable standalone wireless AC access point Automatically updates firmware Cons Cuts speed of main WiFi in half even when paired with the router that it is a companion for Overlaps the primary WiFi zone and can cause loss of speed in the overlap zone Can be unstable. Sometimes it just loses the connection with the main router and needs to be unplugged Poor documentation Leans heavily on WPS setup which is less secure to leave active Slow bootup and connection makes you think the unit is not connecting Signal Strength meter is software based slowing down placement and feels less intuitive Internal antennas don’t reach as far Final thoughts. Overall if this range extender can be an affordable way to extend your existing WiFi without requiring a complete change as long as you can accept its limitations, setup woes, and stability. It has no standout features but can get the job done. Stability issues will likely be sorted out in a future firmware upgraded, which are automatic. Hardware wise it is a decent box. It just needs software refinements. If Linksys could find a way to pair a unit such as this with their routers without cutting the speed in half then it could be a perfect solution for those who want a high end router without dealing with a mesh. This unit can still get the job done but it won't surprise you with great features and easy setup.

    No, I would not recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    A great WiFi extender for a dual band router.

    Posted
    Jsyschan
    • My Best Buy® MemberMember

    I recently received the Linksys Max Stream AC1900+ WiFi Range Extender for a review. This was through the Linksys Family and Friends program. The WiFi Extender claims to extend networks up to 10,000 square feet, and with MU-MIMO technology, there should be no dead spots with this wireless range extender. Packaging: When I received it, there was nothing really fancy. It was just the range extender, regulatory information, and a quick start guide. There was a wrapping of some kind around the device, and the device itself has a piece of plastic film on it. One thing I would like to note about this extender is that it has no power button or switch. It contains very little peripherals: a button for WiFi protected setup, a tiny little factory reset button, and an Ethernet jack. Also, there's only one LED that determines the status of the extender. I would have liked to see a power switch on the device. It would be nice to safely turn off the power before moving the extender somewhere else. Installation: I decided to place the router in the middle of my hallway. The router is on the first floor, and it's hard to reach a signal with my router in my room. I was reaching 2 bars on the 5 GHz band, and the 2.4 GHz band was spotty as well. I hoped the extender could fix all that. Please note that I did NOT set up using WiFi protected setup. I wanted to achieve some control with my device, so I opted to not use WiFi protected setup. Perhaps I could test it another time. First, after installing it, I waited for the lights to settle as indicated by the quick start guide. Then, after disconnecting and connecting to the Linksys extender network, I went to the website that they indicated to setup the extender. I would like to point out that access was limited on the Linksys extender at first, so I couldn't get to the website they mentioned. It takes a few minutes for the extender's network to settle. I followed the instructions online, and selected my networks. It took some time to find my router networks, and it lists them by the name and frequency. As I was waiting, the connection dropped, and I had to reconnect. For the first few times, I couldn't connect, and it took 5-6 times before I could connect again to continue my setup. Eventually, I found my networks, and after clicking on it, it synced up with my home network's connection. This took some time, and there were periods of disconnection, but it was okay for the most part. Once all that was done, it prompted me for names and passwords for the extender networks. It was the same as my router's networks, but with the "_Ext" at the end. Same password and everything. Testing: Once the network was set up, there was connection problems with both channel bands. The network was really slow, getting around 12.75 Mbps for a download speed. However, after an hour or so, it cleared up. After a day of letting the network run, I managed to get a maximum of 42 Mbps. This is much better than just with my router alone. After a few more days, it averaged around 30-40 Mbps, so I'd say that the extender works. Also, I would like to point out that the extender got a little warm near the power outlet, but that's to be expected when working with what I suspect to be a transformer to convert the voltage down. Using the extender, I managed to download a very large game update in around 2.5 to 3 hours, which when compared to my old router, was amazing. The extender really worked when I needed it to, though I wish my game system could better utilize the bands. Final thoughts: Overall, the device works well as a WiFi extender device. Setup without WPS was a little rough and spotty, but it just takes time to get used to the network rebooting. For what it's worth, I wish the design has a slide switch so that I can shut off the extender when my network is not needed. After setup, it was a little annoying that the extender networks needed time to "settle", but after an hour of waiting, they were rearing to go. With peripherals, I wish that that there was an FAQ that could help better explain the extender. Just having a quick start guide really doesn't tell much. After setup, just go to the wifi extender page. Can WPS still be used even if the extender has been set up, or do I have to reset the extender first before I try out WPS? Once I set up my network, what would happen if my extender networks have the same name as my router's networks? Questions like that would be helpful if explained in the guide. Also, the claim of "room to room" wifi with seamless routing is still being tested for me. I am getting a better reception at my dead zone spots in my house, but I can't really tell much about seamless roaming. I received some advice on how to setup the seamless roaming, which is nice, but I wish instructions for this would be in the box rather than having to search online. It's difficult to test the maximum limits of this device without some heavy duty devices that really perform streaming with the 5 GHz network. All in all, I think that this is a worthwhile extender for WiFi networks, and I highly recommend this for any household with a deadzone, though the setup might be a little long and annoying.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Generous Range Coverage For Large Areas

    Posted
    pauldar
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    Eagerly looked forward to receive this complimentary Linksys AC1900 Dual Band Wi-Fi Range Extender and run it through its paces. The router at my existing vacation/retirement home had serious range and dead-spot issues, especially since I expanded the network with additional Wi-Fi enabled clients. My network router could not serve all of the devices, which are spread out over two stories, that have spacious, wrap-a-round decks and also a walkout basement with patio. Lots of area to cover especially when roaming around with two laptops, reading tablet, several smart phones, I-Pad, and portable Wi-Fi speakers while expecting my router to provide adequate range coverage wherever I am at the time. Add to this list more fixed Wi-Fi devices like my security system, smart thermostat, printer, and a Wi-Fi enabled sewing machine. Before starting I bought an inexpensive, surge protector, power strip from Best Buy with a rating of 3,000 joule surge suppression. I then plugged the extender into the strip and followed the 'set-up' instructions (see attached pic). Although surge protection is not mentioned in the guide, I highly recommend surge protection for all electronic equipment, to include this Linksys Range Extender. You can still move it around for best location of signal strength. It's inexpensive insurance. The Linksys AC1900 comes with a 'Quick Start Guide', which is easy to read and also includes helpful, detailed drawings and illustrations. It basically outlines the procedures to set this unit up either in wireless mode, or as a wired range extender. At first I connected the range extender in the wireless mode using the WPS buttons on the router and extender as outlined in the guide. It was simple and quick. I initially mounted the unit at normal receptacle height in the surge protector, about 18” above the floor, on a back wall on the first floor. For several days I continuously moved the range extender everywhere that was practical as the guide suggested to improve signal strength using 'Spot Finder Technology'. However, in wireless mode it just did not give me the coverage I had hoped for. I still had dead-spots and low signal strength in the basement and on the decks. Overall, just a modest improvement in signal strength and coverage. So, I went back to the 'Quick Start Guide' and decided to wire the Linksys Range Extender to my router with a temporary 100' Ethernet cable to reach any of the floors of my house. Once the range extender was powered up and connected to my router's LAN port I located the last three digits of the extender's MAC addy on the back of the RE7000 unit. On my desktop I entered extender.linksys.com to gain access to my extender's login page. This was the most confusing part of the wired setup because my main network and extender network had the same name. As indicated on the extender.linksys.com page I entered the last three digits of the extender's MAX addy (http://RE7000-XXX) on my Android desktop. You can use (http://RE7000-XXX.local) for an Apple MAC. After placing the Android URL in my address bar it took me to the LOGIN page to access my 'Basic Settings'. Here, I addressed both of my 2.4 and 5.0 GHZ extended settings. I found it was very important to provide separate passwords for both network settings so I could log on to that particular setting on my Wi-Fi devices. I wanted my smart phones and smart TVs on the 5.0GHZ network and all others on 2.4. Having separate passwords enables you to logon to either network, 2.4 or 5.0GHZ, depending on your priorities. We stream lots of videos over the internet and want to eliminate buffering on our smart TVs using the 5.0GHZ network and also on the smart phones. Also while in 'Basic Settings' I made sure the security modes matched my main router settings. All in all it takes just a little bit more time and effort to setup the Linksys Range Extender as an access point, but it is much more efficient, powerful, and, the preferred choice by Linksys. You will find it is worth the effort. Plus, it is not really difficult to do. When I finished the wired range extender 'set-up' it took me another week to 'tweak' the entire system. At first I was very pleased with the results – better range coverage and signal strength and only one dead spot, a 100% improvement. YooHoo! But, I thought if I spent a little more time experimenting locations more could possibly be done. So, I went back to the basics. First, I relocated my router as close to the center of the house on the first floor as high as possible, about 6' above the floor and 6' feet away from any other electronic equipment. Then I started to experiment with elevating the Linksys Range Extender as high as possible on various walls of the first and second floor instead of the normal electrical outlet height of 18” above the floor. WooHoo! I found the best location for optimum range coverage and signal strength was approximately 6' above the floor on the front wall of the first floor, roughly 40' from the router. There were only two walls in the way separating the equipment. So, I wired the Ethernet cable from the router to the range extender under the first floor through the basement rafters, using approximately 60' of cable, for a more permanent fix. No dead spots and good signal strength throughout the entire house What I found interesting is that if I am using my smart phone with four bars on the first floor I can wander almost anywhere on the property and still get great Wi-Fi signal strength. I believe it is from the 'beamforming' technology, which, when it connects to a device it focuses a signal directly on that particular device and follows it even as I move around from the first floor to second, outside decks, and even a good signal in the basement. Not working on this full-time, it took me over two weeks to get the router and range extender maximized, but I am now one 'happy camper' and have learned a lot about router placement and the Linksys Range Extender. I highly recommend the Linksys AC1900 Dual Band Wi-Fi Range Extender if you have a large area to cover, or, if you just want the fastest speeds and best signal strength your router and extended network can handle.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Nice extender with deployment options

    Posted
    DickieUK
    • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

    In amongst the craze of 'whole home wifi' there is still a need occasionally to fill a specific 'not-spot' in your home, where you can either; (a) run some ethernet and setup a new WIFI access point (expensive and can be tricky depending on the house) or (b) drop in a wireless extender to extend the existing SSIDs Thankfully this little gadget from Linksys offers you an either/or option. If you're looking for a small plug-in access point then this will do the trick nicely as long as you have an AC outlet handy to the ethernet cable run. I suspect the majority of people reading this , will be looking more for the quick-fix wireless extender, and I can report this Max-Stream AC1900 does the trick nicely. In either access point or extender, the setup is pretty straight forward. I deliberately made my life difficult by plugging it in without any hardwires and trying to setup directly from my phone. Other than me needing to add a static IP address to the phone wireless config, I easily discovered the local setup WIFI SSID on the device, there was nothing clunky about the setup process at all- in fact the setup was very simple and straightforward. Gold star to Linksys in this case for not over complicating something simple. Once I entered in my 5Ghz and 2Ghz network info, the extender attached and offered me the extended network names of SSID-Ext. Now I get why sometimes this is a good idea to help you understand when you are on the main network and when you are on the extended one, but of course that means you have to visit every wireless device in your house and add a config for the 2nd SSID - and you potentially have to give your guests 2 SSIDs as well. So although it sounds logical, I still prefer to mirror the same SSID as I have on the main access point and despite some warnings, this unit happily lets you do that so you're only ever working with the one SSID (I have tried other extenders that don't allow you this flexibility - again, gold star for Linksys). Once its up and running theres not a lot to say that would surprise you. As an extender it does indeed extend the range of your main wireless network with impressive results. Where I was only getting 8Mb/s download from the location I placed the extender running on the main 5Ghz network, this jumped up to a very usable 48MB/s when roaming to the extender (which of course the devices do seamlessly). I pushed it to the extreme end of my house/garage and was still getting ~20MB/s download speed. In my 2400sq ft house, the 2Ghz tends to cover all not-spots, so my primary use would be the 5Ghz 802.11AC but I can confirm the 2Ghz gives similar extended network properties, its just that there less relevant in my particular circumstance. Which brings us to the extender/repeater 'bandwidth tax'... As you may or may not know, when you add a repeater/extender to your existing wireless network it acts as both a client (connecting to your existing wireless network) and an access point (that your devices connect to). The net effect of this dual-connection technology is that you pay a 'tax' of anything up to 50% of your potential throughput - so while I was getting a strong signal and ~50MBs download on the extended connection, when I moved back to the main SSID (and in range of the router) I get almost ~100Mb/s. Don't get me wrong if its a choice between 8MB/s and 40MB/s in a remote location then I'll take it every time, but just set your expectations correctly that 'full signal' doesn't equate to 'full internet speed'. And I should stress of course this is nothing unique to this device - *ANY* repeater/extender will demonstrate the same bandwidth tax. If of course you decide to run this as a hardwired access point, you don't have this bandwidth issue and you get the full power of the wireless radios as if you were standing next to your main router. In closing, its a very, vary capable dual-band Access point with 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz radios , and with the AC-wave2 technology you get the benefit of multi-user MIMO which gives you a dedicated bandwidth stream rather per device, rather than a shared experience that you get with traditional wireless access points and routers. The net effect being that multiple devices should get a better throughput in densely connected wireless networks, especially those single antenna devices like phones and tablets. The only thing to watch out for, is the size. Obviously as the WIFI radios get more powerful , the power and size of the unit gets larger. So while it doesn't eat both sockets in an outlet, you do have to make sure you allow for suitable clearance from the wall (see pictures). Again I wouldnt consider this a criticism of this unit specifically, it just goes with the territory of higher power radios, so just be aware when you decide where to locate it. I received a free sample from Linksys in exchange for my honest feedback, but I consider myself a bit of a 'wifi perfectionist' when it comes to my home coverage so all my testing and opinions above are my own comments. Based the experience with this little device, i'll be replacing my main wifi access points from another vendor with Linksys ones on the assumption that this great experience carries over. I still can't cover every corner and get a signal through every wall in my house, so this will give me the options to drop in tactical wifi coverage, when and where I need it with the minimum of fuss.

    I would recommend this to a friend

    • Brand response

      Linksys Staff

      Hi, DickieUK,

      We're glad to hear your experience with the RE7000. Having different extended SSIDs are helpful to identify where are your devices connected. However, if you prefer using the same SSID and password as the router's, then check out this article for the easy steps: http://www.linksys.com/us/support-article?articleNum=187984

      With regard to the speed, it shouldn't be cut by 50% when your devices are connected to the range extender. To fully utilize its potential, get in touch with us via LinksysCares@linksys.com with your phone number and the link to this post. Our Escalation Engineers would be willing to assist you.


      Regards,

      Irish
      Linksys Support Linksys

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Great Mini AP

    Posted
    aarondr
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
    • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

    I won’t bother going into the advantages of a MU-MIMO setup, but to sum it up at this point it's more about future proofing your setup. MU-MIMO clients are forthcoming and this is the 'next wave' of devices that can unlock their potential. Either way it’s about a device that can match the capability of your router - and like I mentioned earlier - you can pump N300 + AC 1733 through this device making it a great pair with the Linksys EA7500 for extending the range of your network. Personally I always have shied away from this sort of hardware in the past. Generally they’re priced in the same class as full routers but without the external antennas, powerful CPUs, built in Ethernet, and USB ports of their full sized brethren. Of course many consumers aren’t aware of this, and look for these purpose built devices to fill the weak signal spots in their homes. Most routers support AP mode, but not every device supports a wireless range extender mode which this device can do. This basically means you can plug this little guy into a convenient power outlet, configure, and BAM stronger signal! Now it’s never that simple - as your wifi speeds will suffer (and the UI is clear to point this out). That said if you’re trying to extend your network for better Internet coverage, even in wireless range extender mode this device should max out most Internet connections. Truly a device like this doesn’t fit my normal use case. That said after receiving it I fell in love with it. I’m in the minority of the population that crawled under their house and pulled CAT6 cable to most rooms. But that’s a good thing for the RE7000 - since using AP mode helps paint it’s performance in the best possible light. When you do initial setup the device plugins into your wired network for config and gives you the choice: Wired range extender (Access point) or wireless range extender. The second choice comes with this disclaimer: “Extend your Wi-Fi signal without using any cables. This reduces clutter but doesn’t give you optimal Wi-Fi speeds.” Makes sense right? Every WiFi transmission basically gets rebroadcasted to the router. That’s fine and all, but this is an AC1900 device, I have gigabit Ethernet everywhere so let’s go with option A! (In all reality, I know most people interested in this device will want to know how option B goes. No promises, but I’ll try to give it a test). So given that we’re testing how fast this device can act as an AP. Using a 2x2 AC device (866Mbps) I was able to hit very close to the theoretical max my client could maintain (Peaking out around 70MB/sec Windows share copying). Even with 4-5 clients connected, speeds were fairly consistent. My iPad Air 2 and Nexus 6p clients both support 2x2 antennae configs, but their ability to saturate these connections is hampered by their storage and app selection. Even so multiple clients running bandwidth intensive applications still yielded impressive results, with close to 50MB/sec average transfer rates on my Retina MacBook from a local file server while 2 other clients were running speed tests. Using a MacBook Pro w/ a 3x3 antenna configuration yielded good results as well with sustained trainsfer rates around 75MB/sec line of sight. Not the fastest I’ve seen on 3x3 AC, but given the lack of antennas it did well. Even with a few walls I was able to get around 30-40MB/sec sustained. Signal strength was strong on both 2.4 and 5Ghz bands. Performance aside, the web interface built into the device is basic, but clean. No extraneous ‘admin’ username, just a password to manage the device. Once in you can change the operational mode of the device, set a static IP, and set basic wireless settings. While the menu presented encompasses very standard things you’d see on a router, you’ll find their functionality rather shallow. Most settings shouldn’t be touched, or provide basic diagnostic information. If you’re interested, the WLAN statics item will provide a client list. You can ‘ping’ which probably would be helpful if you were diagnosing network uplink issues. Interestingly you can disable one of the bands, but the firmware won’t let you disable both. While this is very much a 1.0 firmware, it’s also pretty stable - even with many clients connected, I never had a dropout. So would you want to drop $150 on this item? At first glance I probably wouldn’t have, but what I’ve realized about these devices is: they’re stealthy! Just like small cube surround speakers took over for the giant floor standing speakers that fell out of fashion, this device can blend with it’s surroundings easily. While it may not look as impressive, the fact you can place this device line of sight with many devices without upsetting the significant other’s feng shui makes it a win in my book. While AC clients tend to handle walls better, older 5Ghz and 2.4Ghz clients will especially benefit from this line of sight. Case in point, I have this placed right next to my entertainment center but line of sight to my couch/family room. I have a Nvidia Shield Portable, which is a 2x2 802.11n 5ghz device. Using the GameStream feature tended to chug a bit even on my high end Netgear R7000, since it was 2 walls and about 12ft away. With this AP plugged in, I have flawless performance - and that’s mostly due to line of sight. If you have living room scenario, where the family sits with their phones/iPads/gaming devices having an AP in the same room can make a big difference, sometimes a staggering difference depending on the generation of device. I can wholeheartedly recommend this device as a wireless AP if you have a room or non-ac clients with high bandwidth requirements. No where else can you get an AC1900 setup in such a tight package that blends in with your environment and provides decent range.

    I would recommend this to a friend




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