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The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild - Nintendo Wii U

ESRB Rating: Everyone 10+
Fantasy violence, Mild suggestive themes, Use of alcohol
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    Overview

    What's Included


    • The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

    Ratings & Reviews


    Overall Customer Rating:
    100% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (2192 out of 2213)

    Product Details


    • Developer: Nintendo
    • Publisher: Nintendo
    • Platform: Nintendo Wii U
    • Genre: Action and Adventure
    • Release Date: 03/03/2017

    Synopsis


    Play as your favorite hero with The Legend of Zelda video game for the Wii U. Fans of the old NES game can revisit the original Legend of Zelda to gather the eight pieces of the Triforce once again. Set out on original quests as Link in The Legend of Zelda video game.

    Features


    Explore the wilds of Hyrule any way you like - Climb up towers and mountain peaks in search of new destinations, then set your own path to get there and plunge into the wilderness.

    More than 100 Shrines of Trials to discover and explore - Shrines dot the landscape, waiting to be discovered in any order you want.

    Be prepared and properly equipped - With an entire world waiting to be explored, you'll need a variety of outfits and gear to reach every corner.

    Battling enemies requires strategy - The world is inhabited with enemies of all shapes and sizes. Each one has its own attack method and weaponry, so you must think quickly and develop the right strategies to defeat them.

    amiibo compatibility - Tap the Wolf Link amiibo (sold separately) to make Wolf Link appear in game.

    For one player.



    Customer rating

    Rating 4.9 out of 5 stars with 2213 reviews

    99%
    would recommend to a friend

    Pros

    Cons

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Amazing! Beautiful! Challenging!

      Posted
      TBHMember
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      One of the reasons I bought the WiiU was to play the newest Zelda game. After waiting what seems like an eternity I finally got to play the game that was promised 4 years ago. Fortunately, the game does not disappoint. "Zelda: Breath of the Wild" gets back to the very roots of the Zelda franchise: open world exploration, fun combat, and puzzle filled dungeons. The game combines some of the best elements of its early entries with lessons learned from other games to form a masterpiece. The exploration is similar to Ocarina of Time but much more open and interactive. You can climb just about everything to get to where you are going, you can glide around in your paraglider to get to difficult spots, you can swim to a number of areas, and, of course, you can ride a horse to various places. While you are traversing the world you get to hunt for food, forage for mushrooms, salvage rusted out ruins, and gather a plethora of ingredients to make meals and elixirs to help you on your journey. Cooking is as much a part of the game as exploring and fighting moblins, and it is rewarding discovering recipes and finding those chase ingredients. Combat is fun if slightly frustrating at times. The controls can be a little tricky as you are getting used to them (for example, clicking the left thumbstick will make you crouch, so if you are too hard on the controls when fleeing sometimes you'll find yourself crouching instead of running). However, they are mostly familiar as they are similar to other 3D Zelda games and you will likely get into a rhythm quickly. At the beginning combat involves some fun tricks, like pushing a boulder on top of enemies, or shooting explosives near bad-guys to make them go boom, and these are quite satisfying. As the game progresses and enemies' healthbars go up, these tricks don't work quite the same, but the game gives you other tools (mostly runes which you use to interact with your environment) to deal with powerful foes. "Breath of the Wild" adds breakable weapons, which means that you can't rely on your trusty fairy-sword anymore. You need to be constantly picking up clubs, swords, spears, pitchforks, and whatever else you can get your hands on because your stuff WILL break and you need to have spares. This adds a bit of intensity to combat as you will have to change weapons (easily using options in the HUD) in the middle of the fight. However, if you manage to find the famed Master Sword, it will be a permanent weapon that will only need to recharge every couple of encounters. There are over 100 hidden shrines (like mini-dungeons) which you can do at your leisure as you pick your way through the story. They provide you with ways to increase your hearts or stamina. They have the typical Zelda puzzles: burning things, pushing things, moving things, blowing things up in order to move through them. They are still satisfying and unquestionably Zelda-esque. There are also strength trials that pit you against powerful foes in combat. They can be difficult, but are incredibly rewarding. The boss dungeons are good puzzles with challenging villains that evoke the feelings of previous Zelda games. In terms of graphics, the game is stunningly beautiful, even on the older WiiU. The character models are bright and detailed. The world feels lived in and real, as if it really does have a history. The landscapes are amazing, made more so by the fact that you can climb on them and interact with them: they aren’t just backdrops. A great game that I would recommend to everyone from Zelda diehards to newbies just breaking into the franchise. Fans of puzzles, exploration, and hack-n-slash will all find something to love about this game

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Simply the best Zelda game ever

      Posted
      Eddy
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      As a long, longtime Zelda fan (the first came out around the time I was born and I've grown up with the series, always playing each new major installment when they're new) I'd like to think I'm pretty qualified to give some pretty solid opinions on this series of games. I love every one of them, from the first up to Skyward Sword, though some especially shine -- generally either the ones that establish long-running traits of the series and mold it as a whole (Zelda 1, Link to the Past and Ocarina especially), or ones that stand out from the rest and try something unique (such as Majora's Mask or A Link Between Worlds). Breath of the Wild is, without a doubt, both of those things at once, and very strongly so. It's the new precedence for the series, and the entry that will likely highly inspire future Zeldas as much as Link to the Past and Ocarina did up until now. But at the same time, it's easily the most unique mainline Zelda yet, taking the open, challenging route of Zelda 1 as well as the "four races in four corners of the world need your help" concept of Majora's Mask, increasing the size and scope by what feels like a hundredfold and altering many basics you've become used to with the series. No ever-present hand-holding helper character, no familiar dungeon system, no myriad of tools that you must complete X amount of the game and Y dungeon to attain (you get MANY of the tools you'll need VERY early on and are set free to explore the rest of the world at your leisure). It's an incredible feeling of freedom, accentuated by things such as the fact that you truly can go anywhere you see, with climbing and scaling mechanics that rival the most open sandboxes out there, with even extremely steep cliffs traversible and nearly any completely vertical surface climbable like a ladder. Then there's the sheer openness of how you can approach and solve any problem you come across -- for this camp of monsters, shall I pelt them from afar with arrow, quaff an elixir of attack or defense and dive in to finish them off? Shall I sneak up and assassinate them, perhaps with stealth gear or potions, then switch to a giant axe to overwhelm the last guy? Shall I fire a carefully-aimed explosive arrow from a nearby hillside and knock the lot of them off a nearby cliff? Shall I lure this one to attack a Cuccoo until they swam him in a hilarious twist of the usual Zelda killer chicken attack? Shall I attach a bomb to a balloon, blow it over there with a wind-generating leaf, pop it with a cheap arrow and remotely detonate it to sow panic and light the surrounding grass on fire, then hop on a wild horse and stomp them in their confusion? Or do I simply fight classic 3d Zelda-style, employing sword, shield and jump-dodging, but adding this game's new mechanics such as perfectly-timed dodges generating wild counterattack combos and multi-level charged attacks reminiscent of Secret of Mana? The list truly goes on and on. It's incredible. And don't think this only applies to combat, either -- puzzles can almost always be solved in a variety of different ways, and considering how strong and realistic the physics are in this game, the possibilities are endless. Can't find a heavy weight to hold down this button? Why not find something lighter, and supplement it with one of each of your bombs to hold the button down? Or perhaps just cast a stasis spell that will keep the button down simply and freely, but with a time limit? Maybe you can't reach an important shrine because it's covered with traps and powerful enemy camps -- so why not swing around the back of the mountain it's perched on, cook some haste and stamina-restoring potions, equip your climbing-sped-buff headband and scale the thing with your bare hands to reach the shrine safely? Again, I could go on and on. Long story short: this game is absolutely essential. If you have a Wii U or Switch or ever plan to get either, you simply must own this game. It's Nintendo's greatest product in ages, and as defining an entry into their legendary catalog as the most genre-defining games of the past. Breath of the Wild *IS* this generation's Ocarina of Time. In fact, it might just be the most defining Zelda since the first.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Unprecedented.

      Posted
      Victreebong
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      I wish I had screenshots to show you what this game's like, but take it from me, this is the apex of open world gaming. BotW and Horizon unfortunately came out at the exact same time and there's going to be comparisons, but let me just clear the air; this game takes the crown of open world experiences. I've been playing for a week and a half, and I've only scratched the surface of provinces. I've gotten to about four of them, and I believe there's twelve! That's just how freaking enormous this title is. From the get-go we're given fast travel to Shrines (mini dungeons that allow Link to upgrade his heart containers or endurance after completing 4) because you could spend half a day trying to get from one local to another. This is not an exaggeration. BotW doesn't hold your hand, it throws you into the elements with freezing weather, fast currents, rainy cliffs, lightning strikes, Moblin camps, wild fires, and mini bosses that double as Weapon enemies from the FF series. All the familiar LoZ elements are here, former enemies, bows, shields, Master Sword, hearts, rods. But BotW mixes up things with making equipment destructible. It takes a page from Resident Evil and makes you plan accordingly instead of running in guns blazing. Failure to not read enemies and situations appropriately means swords get broken fast, shields cannot defend you, and eye beam blasts that one-shot you into a flaming fetal position of anger. So one part Resident Evil and a second part Dark Souls. Also, while familiar dungeons do exist in-game, they're not what you typically encounter. Shrines are the new dungeons which are smaller yet just as calculating. The spoils from shrines vary, but typically they offer better gear for your travels over some progress important weapon we're used to. TL;DR, you don't get the Magic Hammer in a shrine to progress further, you get a melee weapon which might be better than the one in your inventory. The crux of the game is survival. My favorite part of the game (besides battling, riding, sight seeing, questing, and strategizing) is cooking! If you thought there was an excessive amount of items before, HA! Not only can you cook an entire bill of fare in this title, you can concoct a nearly limitless number of elixirs and dishes with endless constraints. If something really doesn't mesh, you get a piled of censored goo (no joke, pixilated censorship squares) that just gives you a heart container worth of recovery. But mother of God, you can double your heart containers with dishes, become Sonic with another dish, become nigh detectable with another, the list goes on. The best part, the dishes come from materials in the environment! Bugs, lizards, and monster parts typically get you elixirs (no health recovery), while normal fruits, meats, poultry, mushrooms and herbs net you full blown courses that heal you AND give you shorter term buffs. Only one attribute buff can be active at a time with cooking, so again you need to strategize a little on what you're trying to get with some trial and error. but if you're like me and loving farming stuff, this is probably bigger than Diablo or WarCraft for item collecting. This title is less heavy on fetch quests, but I need to mention an IMPORTANT ONE; after you get to Kakariko Village in Necluda, you can start increasing your equipment carrying via a character named Hetsu. He's on the southern road outside of town. All those Korok Seeds you've been mysteriously collecting are to give to this bum in order to increase slots in your inventory. YOU NEED TO DO THIS ASAP! And I suggest going for more melee gear and maybe one bow before shields. Rare items start piling up, and you need to save some gear for the enemies they're effective against (IE. Guardian Swords and bows against Guardian type enemies). Controls take getting used to. I'm not too keen on the Runes (abilities you acquire very early on), but it's important to remember you can control metal, throw infinite bombs, and take lots of pictures to get insight into how things work in BotW. Music is very soft. In the open world you're absorbing what's around you, so the music is subtle. And lastly... the sights. The freaking sights. Every time you save the game you get some panoramic landscape shot that would bring National Geographic to their knees in tears. Light from the west can obstruct rain beads to bring in a glow effect, there's typically a double rainbow if it's raining during the day, water blends light stratification on its surface, things illuminate at night that are inactive during the day, animals are on the oddest cliff faces, it never stops. The fire animation in BotW is some of the best I've seen in a title. One little hiccup though, and this is prevalent in the Wii U version and the docked Switch version, there's occasional frame rate drop. This tends to happen in villages, or forests where there's simply too many items. It'll drop from solid 30p to around 22p. It's noticeable, but not game breaking. Currently, Breath of the Wild is selling Switch consoles, but for those of us who finally wanted that new Zelda title on our loving Wii U's, this is it. This is what we've been waiting for since Skyward Sword, heck since Ocarina of Time! You don't have to read my longwinded review to realize that this game is THE game changer. Perfect scores across the board on sites like IGN, and they're not wrong.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

      An Excellent Dive Into An Open World Hyrule

      Posted
      BVFire
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

      Having grown up playing various Legend of Zelda games, I found myself quite excited for the release of this "open world" Zelda game. And for the most part, it certainly did not disappoint. This game changed up a number of familiar aspects in its mechanics, with the most notable addition being the weapon durability system. While at first this system proved to be an annoyance as it routinely caused me to wear out my powerful weapons. I quickly learned from those mistakes and took better care in what I used. The durability system affects the weapons Link wields, his shields, and also his bows. As I progressed through the game though, I never ran into a situation where I was completely helpless. Weapons were also always right around the corner by either finding some off a soon-to-be fallen enemy, through purchasing them, or simply plucking some out of the shrines. With shrines being mentioned, the next big change worthy of noting was the handling of the dungeons in this game. In Breath of the Wild, there are four main dungeons directly related to the story. While they are not required, it is strongly suggested that you go through them. These four dungeons (the Divine Beasts) are all fairly simple, and a little disappointing in scope and repetitiveness when compared to the longer dungeons of Wind Waker or Ocarina of Time. That being said, each dungeon features a unique mechanic that affects the map layout, which you must make use of in order to finish it. The bosses of each dungeon are all various forms of Gannon, and are similar in appearance, but require different strategies in order to beat. The other type of dungeons you will run into are the various shrines scattered throughout all of Hyrule. These, for the most part, are min-dungeons that generally can take 5 - 10 minutes to complete, depending on complexity and player ability. Some shrines contain a handful of puzzles to figure through while others merely hold an enemy of varying power to defeat. The reward in each shrine (120 in total) is what is known as a Spirit Orb. These orbs essentially take the place of the heart containers that you would have searched out in other games. The main difference being that you may use four Spirit Orbs for another heart, or use four of them for an increase in the new stamina meter. A brief mention with the stamina meter: it's annoying at first, but as you move through the game and get more stamina, travelling becomes easier. Stamina is mainly expended when you run, climb, or swim. Certain gear allows your easier climbing. The gear (different clothing) is also a nice addition to the game, and allows for various stat boosts and abilities. The weakest element of Breath of the Wild for me is actually the story. It seems to have placed such a high focus on the open world element, that the story really feels like it has taken a back seat to everything else. While everyone gets something different out of the Zelda games, the story-telling has always been one of my favorite elements. In Breath of the Wild, the story is really up to the player to discover. Since it is open world, you could attempt to bypass almost the entire story and go straight for the final boss (not recommended). For those that want to get the story out, there unfortunately isn't much depth to it other than Link awaking from a long slumber and finding Gannon terrorizing Hyrule. The story mainly comes through flashbacks with Zelda, and also from what you learn from visiting the Divine Beasts. This is also the first Zelda game to feature voice acting. For this game, the quality of voice acting varies, but fortunately, you will have the option (via an update from Nintendo) to listen to the voice-overs in a variety of languages. While I haven't made use of the bilingual update, I am excited to listen to the characters in other languages to compare the voice-work. With the voices, it certainly is a personal preference, and I'm sure there are plenty who will have less issue with the voice-work then I. Overall, this game was a lot of fun to play. The exploration was certainly a great deal of fun, and sometimes, I enjoyed just letting my horse do the navigating so I could enjoy the beautiful scenery. The graphics in this game look gorgeous, and having the ability to travel pretty much anywhere very early-on made this to be that much more of an immersive experience. While this is certainly not a perfect game from my perspective, I certainly think it is worth your time if you are Zelda fan, or even if you've never picked up a Zelda game before, there is a lot to enjoy from this game.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Great addition for a series slowly growing stale

      Posted
      John
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      The Legend of Zelda series originally had it roots in an open world environment. The original game all of the way back on the NES had a giant world to explore despite whether or not Link was actually ready to deal with areas he couldn't fully explore and/or enemies he was too weak to fight. Didn't stop anybody for going where they weren't supposed to! As the series has gone on, the Legend of Zelda took a linear approach to its game design. In order to "explore" you had to get a new item from a dungeon in the order the game chooses or the game would outright stop you from going where you wanted using NPCs, giant indestructible rocks, or gimmicks that can only be solved with a usable tool from a dungeon. This isn't particularly bad; The series has done a good job making sure Link isn't too powerful before tackling the next exploration-limiting obstacle. I also presume this type of game design was made in order to structure a better narrative, as many story events wouldn't make sense if they were played out of order. As a long term fan, I often enjoy these narratives and I enjoy the linearity, but for me, the series' game design using linearity to advance has begun to overstay its welcome. In Breath of the Wild, the exploration limits are the borders of what makes the entire land of Hyrule. You are given all of the tools necessary to explore every facet of the game world after the tutorial. Then the game lets you go anywhere you want, whether or not Link is ready for what's out there. At this point, Link only has three or four hearts. A lot of things will kill Link in one hit. The cloth shirt and cloth pants Link wears at the beginning of the game is as effective at reducing damage as a real cloth shirt and real cloth pants: They do nothing to help Link survive when he suffers to swords, clubs, spears, fire, lightning, lava, freezing cold temperatures, scorching desert sun... the list goes on. These are still "obstacles," but they're lite in so far as you can still go... Link will just die. Really fast. The beginning of the game is quite cruel. As it should be. This is the game's way of teaching the player that you can't stroll your way along through many of the game's hazards (barring glitches some people have discovered). Yet, this is still a sandbox game. You have to learn the game by finding crafty solutions to do something to get somewhere. It may be absolutely cheesy, but you still found a solution. The player is rewarded for finding ways to bypass situations Link was supposed to tackle "properly". Or you may end up taking the long way around an obstacle to get to a certain place, if the player doesn't feel confident winning in a direct confrontation. I think that's really cool. But eventually, you will have to do that direct confrontation. Most sandbox games don't really have an "end". Usually you decide when the game ends. Skyrim doesn't truly end until you've done everything you've wanted to or really, gotten sick of playing. This sandbox game does have an actual end. Calamity Ganon is waiting for you at the end... or at the beginning. You can go to the final boss of the game as soon as you finish the tutorial level. And unlike Skyrim, it's not scaled to the Level of the Dragonborn (Link doesn't have Levels). Whether you're skilled enough to survive the final boss and the dungeon to get to the final boss is a different story, because the main story missions make the final boss easier and the trek there easier. You're in for a bad time if you go right away. And if you do, better have those reflexes polished and know those attack tells as if it was second nature. Breath of the Wild accomplishes what it aimed to do really well. The only issues I've encountered are some framerate issues while Link is running through areas heavy with trees and grass, but it lessens after leaving the tutorial area (my guess is they were trying to make the tutorial area as beautifully dense as possible). There are also times when the game freezes for a moment. Once out of a playtime of about 60 hours, it lasted about two seconds. I've noticed this only happens while fighting enemies. I don't know why, but it's there. This will definitely bother some players more than others, but it didn't affect my ability to deal with enemies.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Open World Zelda Game

      Posted
      Jacob
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      Differences Wii U version compared to Switch: The core experience is the same just some technical issues that doesn't make it the definitive version of the game like: -Slightly lower resolution -Slower loading. Dying can result in 5-10second loading screen which is maybe half of that or less on the Switch version -Lower Audio Quality -Requires a mandatory 3gb install Wished the Wii U version have duel screen/gamepad compatibility (like in Wind Waker HD, Twilight Princess HD) to make it stand out from the Switch version, but it doesn't which is very disappointing. Overall if you can deal with the loading times for the most part, you are essentially getting the same experience. Now onto the Review: Like how 'Zelda Link Between Worlds' harken back to 'Zelda Link to the Past' in the 2D games, Zelda Breath of the Wild goes back to the open world design of the original Legend of Zelda (although technically not a 3D game). The game is very open world. You can just rush though and go to your main objective, but there's a lot of side quests and detours along the way to detract you from saving the world. Also without upgrades along the way it's a very hard game to beat, unless you're a very skilled gamer. So for those who like more linear games and do not like to exploring or crafting then this game may be a bit off putting. This game has a lot of resource management involved in terms of stamina, weapon/inventory management, weather and health. Weapons are breakable in this game so you are not able to hold onto an attack item or shield for the duration of the game. Crafting is involved for some weapons. Items are easy to come by, but will not be the same for every play session, so a great conversation piece when comparing experiences with your friends. The weapon variety is amazing, even if you break a weapon, you are able to obtain another one from a fallen enemy making a enemy defeat a satisfying victory. Not everything is expendable as there are some permanent upgrades you gain in your adventure Inventory management is a bit troublesome especially if you're used to the gamepad screen in Wind Waker HD or Twilight Princess HD and you have to scroll through menus instead of a simple blind press(if you know where the weapon/item is), but is is manageable Enemies in the game do a lot of damage. You have to get used to the battle animations of most enemies. It's not Dark Souls hard, but some trail and error is required especially if you go against enemies that does high damage. The checkpoint system is forgivable though. The world is very massive and you can go anywhere in the world with no invisible walls. There's also mini dungeons or shines sprinkled through the mass landscape so there's a lot to do. There's a sense of wonder and discovery as you learn as you go instead of the game hand holding you through it The 4 main dungeons does not have keys like in past Zelda games, instead you have to manipulate your surroundings to progress which is a nice change in the series and feels more life like/realistic Overall very good game if you're the explorer type and like to learn game mechanics as you go.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Great new Zelda adventure

      Posted
      bluehobbes
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      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      [4.5 / 5 stars] (rounded up to 5 on the Best Buy scale) This is a great new entry in the Zelda series. It draws on a mix of gameplay mechanics that worked well in past Zelda games and brings them into a fresh open-world experience. Gameplay is great. I love that this game rewards curiosity and experimentation. There are a lot of different ways you can approach combat, for example. You can creatively use tools and the environment to deal with enemies, or you can rush in for a close-quarters brawl if you wish. Most of the time, if you ask yourself "I wonder if this will work...?", it usually will - and it's awesome! It's very fun to experiment with different creative ways to solve problems. The combat itself is challenging, especially at the beginning. You can easily encounter enemies that are vastly more powerful than you and can one-shot you. The swordplay is similar to Wind Waker but I find the timing for perfect dodges/parries more difficult than Wind Waker, which is a good thing because I think the Wind Waker swordplay was too easy. The swordplay in Breath of the Wild, thankfully, has a little bit more of a learning curve to it, and I find to be more satisfying than past titles. Weapons do degrade and break, and it seems like this has drawn a mixed reaction from people. Personally, I love the weapons system because it keeps you constantly scavenging for weapons and forces you to be creative and strategic in combat situations. It creates fun situations - for instance, in dire situations you might have to race monsters to pick up the last weapon on the field before they do! And never fear, you can find some special weapons that can be rebuilt after they break, and the Master Sword never breaks. The world is huge, and beautiful. There are many different biomes to explore and many things to encounter. I am very deep into the game and still find something new virtually every time I sit down to play. There are some graphical issues. Draw distance is very poor for a modern game, resolution is relatively low for a modern game, and there are frequent frame rate drops. However, these don't ultimately hinder the enjoyment of the game at all, at least not for me. The world is so awesome and fun it was easy for me to overlook the graphical drawbacks. I'm playing on the Wii U version and can say I have felt no reason whatsoever that I might have missed out on something by not getting the Switch version. The game is perfectly fine on the Wii U. One last thing I will say is that the main story and dungeons seem weaker to me than past titles, but again I didn't mind this so much because the world as a whole is so fun to explore. This is a Zelda game in which you can almost write your own story with all the fun you will have adventuring out in the vast wilderness! Highly recommended to past Zelda fans and newcomers alike, I think this is easily one of the funnest games out on the market right now.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Amazing Zelda experience. A must own.

      Posted
      QuickSciFi
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      After 71 hours of gameplay, I can attest this game is definitely a masterpiece. I felt all throughout like I last did with A Link to the Past; my favorite Zelda game. After beating BotW, I can safely say it instantly rose among the top of my favorite Zelda games. The game was obviously optimized for the Wii U GamePad. The motion-aided aiming controls were as excellent as I found them to be in games like Uncharted: Golden Abyss on the PS Vita. You don't have to aim all the way via motion controls. You do your usual aiming via the right analog stick, bring the crosshairs within range of your target, then use the motion controls for that final pinpoint precision aim. It was flawless, IMO. Now, this, is the proper use of motion controls. I cannot imagine having this same flow when playing in handheld format on the Switch, though; as it is exactly what playing on the Wii U GamePad screen is like. You have to tilt the screen when aiming to at least 45 degrees at times; which took me away from the visual dynamic slightly. But the most important reason why it just won't play with motion controls as beautifully as it did with the Wii U GamePad on the Switch is during some of the shrine puzzles; which are so easy to do with motion controls; but would prompt you to use that tablet like a literal plank, twisting it upside down and sideways to balance one or several rolling balls, etc. I will admit, it took me a while to get into the gameplay; primarily because I went into it right after finishing-up with Horizon: Zero Dawn on the PS4. At this point, tbh, I don't consider one game to be superior to the other. They are their own entity, each offering as polished an experience as any gamer could ask for. But, as I said, I will go on to admit that it did take me a while to really get into BotW. It may have been just a couple of hours out of the whole 71+ hours I invested into it, but those were 2 solid hours that kept taking me away from the experience from not fully grasping the textures and solid sharp colors I got so used to seeing in games like, even, Mario Kart 8; or the funny climbing mechanics of BotW (akin to Spider-Man) that I found downright unimaginative at first glance. But all of these and more managed to quickly find their way into a very congruent gameplay experience, shock-full of what I now consider awe-inspiring graphics. In the end, the textures were there when they needed to be; and so did the sharpness in graphics as well as solid colors. It is an art style akin to a waterpainting; which I absolutely love. It reminded so much of J.R.R. Tolkien's personal illustrations for The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings; for which he used watercolors. He, too, had a predilection for depicting flora and landscapes with inlaid ruins and fantastic characters. Tolkien is my favorite writer. Needless to say, I was right at home.

      I would recommend this to a friend


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