Drive [Blu-ray] [Includes Digital Copy] [UltraViolet] [2011]

  • SKU: 4614796
  • Release Date: 01/31/2012
  • Rating: R
Includes Digital Copy
$9.99
Cardmember Offers

Overview

Ratings & Reviews


Overall Customer Rating:
96% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (604 out of 630)

Special Features


  • 4 featurettes: I Drive: the Driver,
  • Driver and Irene: the relationship,
  • Under the hood: story,
  • Cut to the chase: stunts
  • Drive without a driver: interview with Nicholas Winding Refn documentary

Synopsis


Drive
A lone-wolf Hollywood stunt driver (Ryan Gosling) moonlights as a freelance getaway wheelman, and he finds his solitary existence taking on new meaning after befriending Irene (Carey Mulligan), the lonely wife of convicted felon Standard (Oscar Isaac), and her young son Benicio (Kaden Leos). When Standard gets released from prison and is strong-armed into committing a bold daytime robbery, the Driver offers his services in an effort to help the repentant ex-con cut his ties to the criminal underworld. Things get complicated, however, when the robbery goes unexpectedly awry, and the Driver just barely manages to escape alive. When the take from the job proves to be stratospherically higher than the Driver was led to believe, it quickly becomes apparent that they were set up. Later, thugs threaten to kill Irene and Benicio, and all evidence points to transplanted New York crime boss Bernie Rose (Albert Brooks) and his hot-headed partner Nino (Ron Perlman) as the masterminds. As the Driver attempts to turn the tables on them, it becomes clear that the chain of command goes much higher than he could have ever anticipated. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

Cast & Crew


  • Ryan Gosling
    Ryan Gosling - Driver
  • Carey Mulligan
    Carey Mulligan - Irene Carey
  • Bryan Cranston
    Bryan Cranston - Shannon
  • Albert Brooks
    Albert Brooks - Bernie Rose
  • Oscar Isaac
    Oscar Isaac - Standard



Customer rating

4.5
96%
would recommend to a friend
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Visually Stunning

    Posted
    TheFallenJedi
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

    Drive is an enjoyable visual experience. Gosling's subtle acting is refreshing during the first viewing. However, after repeated viewings, it tends to come off as somewhat forced and wooden. There are a few scenes that are an absolute pleasure. The initial heist, elevator and hotel scenes immediately come to mind. The shower sequence that transpires within the hotel scene is a commendable nod to Scarface and a bona fide adrenaline rush. At times the film's art house style and visuals feel a bit forced and distracting. The dialogue can fall flat. Unnecessarily long pauses frequently occur within the dialogue, often resulting in discordantly simplistic lines . This can be frustrating at times, making the exchanges between Gosling and Mulligan distracting and strained. Talking to a character that has little to say can only work for so long before losing it's initial charm. Fortunately, scenes containing Brooks and Cranston provide a better platform for dialogue (especially when they are interacting with each another). Despite these issues, there's still something quite enjoyable about this film. Maybe it's the simplistic story with some beautifully executed visuals that helps distinguish itself from the current wave of bloated, self-absorbed, films that are currently engulfing cinema. Why are so many screenwriters filled with delusions of grandeur and a to need write stories in vein of Tarantino? There's a point where imitation goes from flattering to annoying. Drive avoids this pitfall and is content to be what it is-- a candid story with lush visuals, which seamlessly transition between elegant tranquility and appropriate doses of tenacious violence. All of this is perfectly complimented by a superb 80s influenced soundtrack. Drive's like that one girl every guy's met at a party once. She appears to be invisible to every other man in the room. But for some unexplainable reason there's an instantaneous wave of attraction that completely envelopes your body the moment you see her. You talk to her. It's exciting and refreshing. Almost surrealistic. Yet you leave without getting her number. Maybe the mere thought of making a move and getting rejected would tarnish a moment that's so pure..so perfect that it needs to remain just that--a moment. A much needed good memory to overshadow a bad one. But as soon as you reach your place to retire for the night, you realize you just walked away from something special. That girl electrified your senses. You're not sure what distinguished her from the rest. You'll never know. And that's why you'll always be left wanting more.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Wheelman extraordinaire

    Posted
    Treydle
    • Top 100 ContributorTop 100 Contributor

    Precision driving can mean the difference between a long prison sentence and a clean getaway. For the right price and with the right connection, those are services you can obtain once and only once and Ryan Gosling provides them. Starring as a character that is never given a name, Gosling works as a mechanic for Shannon (played by Bryan Cranston) who also allows him to use vehicles brought to his garage for servicing for his illicit activities. In addition, he does the occasional bit of stunt driving for Hollywood films. Not to mention the fact that Shannon’s (Cranston’s) associate Bernie Rose (played way against type by Albert Brooks) is considering a proposal Shannon made to have Driver race professionally with Bernie (Brooks) as their benefactor. Things appear to be going swimmingly until Driver offers assistance to a neighbor being coerced to perform a robbery. The neighbor, Standard (played by Oscar Isaac), was recently released from prison and fears what his associate will do to his family. A family that Driver became quite close to in the time between when he met them and the day Standard was released. The violence is a little gruesome, and the surreal nature of a character with no name is something that didn’t actually strike me until after I left the theater. That said, the story is interesting, the performances spectacular and the general feel of the film is right on target. It is light-years ahead of films like The Transporter that seek to turn their characters into superheroes.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    DRIVE was the best picture of 2011

    Posted
    AreaMang
    • My Best Buy® MemberMember

    DRIVE is not just about "driving cars" - in fact, the title of the movie has a lot more to do with character motivations than motor vehicles. People who are expecting THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS need not apply. In a way, DRIVE reminds me of A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE. A great slow burn film featuring interesting and complicated characters that climaxes in some violent shots of such intensity that you would probably close your eyes if it weren't for the fact that the film has already cut away by the time your brain has processed what it is seeing. While intense and sometimes unexpected, the violence is not excessive or unnecessary. The soundtrack is also amazing. Cliff Martinez does an outstanding job handling the orchestral side, while Kavinsky & Lovefoxxx, Desire, College and the Chromatics supply the retro '80s sound. I immediately bought the soundtrack after watching DRIVE in theaters and it has gotten a lot of play. I think DRIVE was easily the best film of 2011. It's a shame that it was snubbed by the Golden Globes and the Oscars. Albert Brooks absolutely deserved a Best Supporting nom for his wickedly evil portrayal of Bernie Rose. Gosling, as always, delivers 110%. If you skip DRIVE you're doing yourself a disservice.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Art house action

    Posted
    Treydle
    • Top 100 ContributorTop 100 Contributor

    Precision driving can mean the difference between a long prison sentence and a clean getaway. For the right price and with the right connection, those are services you can obtain once and only once and Ryan Gosling provides them. Starring as a character that is never given a name, Gosling works as a mechanic for Shannon (played by Bryan Cranston) who also allows him to use vehicles brought to his garage for servicing for his illicit activities. In addition, he does the occasional bit of stunt driving for Hollywood films. Not to mention the fact that Shannon’s (Cranston’s) associate Bernie Rose (played way against type by Albert Brooks) is considering a proposal Shannon made to have Driver race professionally with Bernie (Brooks) as their benefactor. Things appear to be going swimmingly until Driver offers assistance to a neighbor being coerced to perform a robbery. The neighbor, Standard (played by Oscar Isaac), was recently released from prison and fears what his associate will do to his family. A family that Driver became quite close to in the time between when he met them and the day Standard was released. The violence is a little gruesome, and the surreal nature of a character with no name is something that didn’t actually strike me until after I left the theater. That said, the story is interesting, the performances spectacular and the general feel of the film is right on target. It is light-years ahead of films like The Transporter that seek to turn their characters into superheroes.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    The Substance of Style

    Posted
    HappyDog44

    This is a movie for film buffs, not for car lovers. As you've probably noticed, the bad reviews come from car lovers who were hoping for a car chase movie. This isn't that movie. This is a movie about characters; people who draw you in and who you want to know more about. It's also a movie about the art of film making and how style can deliver substance. The director, Nicolas Winding Refn, brings a vision to this movie that is both fresh and yet familiar. Film noir meets street style. This is also an actors movie. The sparse dialog means they bring their characters to us through the play of emotions on their faces as much as through their words. Carey Mulligan and Ryan Gosling have a great chemistry and they really don't need to say anything because you can see what they're feeling. I also have to say that the "extras" that come with this edition are among the best I've ever seen. The interview with Nicolas Winding Refn is really great and the fact is, I've watched the extras more times than the movie. If you're a film buff, you will want to own this movie.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Man of few words

    Posted
    Treydle
    • Top 100 ContributorTop 100 Contributor

    Precision driving can mean the difference between a long prison sentence and a clean getaway. For the right price and with the right connection, those are services you can obtain once and only once and Ryan Gosling provides them. Starring as a character that is never given a name, Gosling works as a mechanic for Shannon (played by Bryan Cranston) who also allows him to use vehicles brought to his garage for servicing for his illicit activities. In addition, he does the occasional bit of stunt driving for Hollywood films. Not to mention the fact that Shannon’s (Cranston’s) associate Bernie Rose (played way against type by Albert Brooks) is considering a proposal Shannon made to have Driver race professionally with Bernie (Brooks) as their benefactor. Things appear to be going swimmingly until Driver offers assistance to a neighbor being coerced to perform a robbery. The neighbor, Standard (played by Oscar Isaac), was recently released from prison and fears what his associate will do to his family. A family that Driver became quite close to in the time between when he met them and the day Standard was released. The violence is a little gruesome, and the surreal nature of a character with no name is something that didn’t actually strike me until after I left the theater. That said, the story is interesting, the performances spectacular and the general feel of the film is right on target. It is light-years ahead of films like The Transporter that seek to turn their characters into superheroes.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    The essence of action

    Posted
    MogwaiJesus
    • My Best Buy® MemberMember

    Stripped to the bone. That's what "Drive" is, essentially. It's an action film that takes all the ancillary things normally associated with the genre and tosses them out the window, leaving only the core elements behind. If you're looking for "The Fast and the Furious, featuring Ryan Gosling," you'll be very disappointed. In fact, "Drive" is just about the polar opposite of that concept: where you might expect a convoluted story, characters with transparent motives, and slick action, you get a simple plot, an enigmatic hero, and shockingly brutal violence. How simple is the plot, and enigmatic the hero? Let's put it this way: Gosling's character doesn't even have a name. But that's the point: the Driver doesn't need a name. All he needs is a mission. To say more would spoil the surprises that the admittedly minimalistic plot has in store. Suffice to say the performances are great (Gosling is terrific, but the real treat here is Albert Brooks' vicious turn), the action sequences are pulse-pounding, and director Nicolas Winding Refn guides the film along beautifully. "Drive" was my pick for the best film of 2011, and it's well worth checking out.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Good story, great movie

    Posted
    VladSF
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® MemberMember

    First, the title can be a little misleading if you expect an action loaded movie. This is NOT A Fast and the Furious movie, this is a movie where you have a very good story, great visual, great development of characters, where "drive" is used in the sense of "keep going". The story is around Driver, who is a stunt driver by day and a getaway car driver by night. He stars a relationship with his neighbor, a single mother, and starts to open himself to her and the kid. In the meanwhile, a robbery goes bad and he realized he was going to be framed for that robbery. He is trying to figure out who is trying to frame him while the dad of the neighbor's kid gets out of jail and comes back to her, staring a love triangle. Driver is conflicted between the crime world he lives in (solitary, quiet) and the new perspective of the love he feels for her neighbor (that makes him warmer and more of a person), and he has to decide what side wins.

    I would recommend this to a friend



Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.