Noah [2 Discs] [Includes Digital Copy] [Blu-ray/DVD] [2014]

Includes Digital Copy
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Overview

Ratings & Reviews


Overall Customer Rating:
85% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (763 out of 907)

Special Features


  • Disc 1: Blu-Ray feature film + special features -
  • Iceland: extreme beauty
  • The ark exterior: a battle for 300 Cubits
  • The ark interior: animals two by two
  • Disc 2: DVD feature film
  • Closed Captioned

Synopsis


Noah
Darren Aronofsky brings the story of Noah's Ark to the big screen with this Paramount/New Regency production. "In the beginning, there was nothing." So starts this version of the story centered on Noah (Russell Crowe), the man entrusted by God to save the innocent animals of Earth as the rising floodwaters cleansed the planet of mankind's evil. As the telling continues, we learn how Adam and Eve's sins have passed down through generations through their sons Cain and Abel, and how the descendants of their righteous sibling Seth were entrusted with defending creation. One day, while foraging in the country, a descendant of Seth, Noah, sees his father slain by a descendant of Cain. In the process, Noah's birthright is stolen from him. Decades later, as a father of three, Noah experiences a vision foretelling the great flood that will wash over the Earth, destroying every living thing that stands on the soil. That vision leads Noah to seek out his grandfather, Methuselah, in order to understand his mission. When a second vision reveals that Noah is to construct a massive ark designed to shelter every living animal during the great flood, Noah, his wife Naameh (Jennifer Connelly), their three sons Shem (Douglas Booth), Ham (Logan Lerman), and Japheth (Leo McHugh Carroll), and their adoptive sister Ila (Emma Watson) immediately begin construction on the vessel with the help of the Watchers, a race of angels created as beings of light, but encrusted in stone and mud and forsaken by God for their attempts to help man. Meanwhile, word of Noah's work soon reaches Tubal Cain (Ray Winstone), who gathers an army on a mission to overtake the ark, and survive the coming storm by any cost. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

Cast & Crew


  • Russell Crowe
    Russell Crowe - Noah
  • Jennifer Connelly
    Jennifer Connelly - Naameh
  • Ray Winstone
    Ray Winstone - Tubal Cain
  • Emma Watson
    Emma Watson - Ila
  • Anthony Hopkins
    Anthony Hopkins - Methuselah



Overall customer rating

4
85%
would recommend to a friend
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

    Not Quite the Bible

    Posted
    AmosL
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase

    “Noah” Not Quite the Bible Amos Lassen “Noah” is Darren Aronofsky’s “uneven but undeniably bold, personal, visually extravagant take on the Old Testament tale will surely polarize critics and audiences”. The story of Noah is one that is steeped in tradition and fantasy. The film respects the Biblical story but it also takes liberties with it by adding to the basic foundation found in the Hebrew Bible and creates both a world and a scenario that add to the basic tale and this causes the story of Noah and the flood to be a distinct tale that sets it apart from the narrative of the Book of Genesis—for a religious person the message of the original is here and for the non-religious, there is still a story to relate to. Aronofsky who both directed and co-wrote the screenplay imagines the story as theater with beautiful tableaux and the backdrop of sky in bold colors. At first, everything is representational and then the scenes expand—the six creations are told to us orally and visually and then we move from darkness to the earth that is represented as a molten mass. The days are actually millions of years and we see the creatures enter the picture in time-lapse sequences. Humans appear in a golden glow in Eden, a paradise. We see Cain kill Abel and the soldiers killing each other throughout history. Noah (Russell Crow) tells us his vision from the Creator of an earth under water and then Naameh (Jennifer Connelly), his wife appears. We see them as ancestors, as shadows against a dark sky and science and religion, history and legend are blended as the lines between them are blurred. The story begins. We see Noah as a young man standing alone; the last in the line of Adam and Eve; he is the son of Seth and he was witness to Cain’s tribe that was responsible for killing of his father. The conflict between the tribes continues and it is the descendants of Cain who believe that humankind should hold dominion over the Earth and its resources. The line of Seth believes they are stewards of creation. The progeny of Cain, fueled by a mineral that emits energy, has overtaken the globe in a collection of industrial cities. As an adult, Noah is the father of three sons and his vision is to seek out his grandfather Methuselah (Anthony Hopkins) to discover the meaning of the world. The answer to the riddle of the submerged earth is a massive ark to hold two of each species of animal in the world, restarting the natural course of Earth while human being perish in a great flood. Here Aronofsky adds to the story with a group of fallen angels who are known as “Watchers” and it is their duty to come to earth and protect humanity after the expulsion from the Garden of Eden. “They are giants composed of rock and mud, with four arms and faces contorted into a gnarled version of the tragedy mask—a visage of perpetual sadness for those with no place in the Creator’s universe. They may appear out of place, but there’s a biblical basis for these creatures. They answer the question of how Noah and his small family construct a gigantic ark and also serve as the family’s guardians”. One of the problems in understanding the Noah story is if there is to be a watery apocalypse intended to wash away all of humanity, surely there would be other humans determined to survive. They arrive led by Tubal-cain (Ray Winstone), the king of the great cities of Cain’s descendants, and want their place on the ark before the rains begin to fall and geysers of water erupt from the ground. Within the family, there are divides, primarily on the part Noah’s son Ham (Logan Lerman), who is jealous of his brother Shem’s (Douglas Booth) romance with Ila (Emma Watson) and resentful of his father’s apprehension in finding a wife for his middle son. Aronofsky’s film is an ambitious, brave and visually stunning adaptation that offers a grandiose reinterpretation of Noah’s fabled salvation and the regular Bible reading. We know the story of Noah—God (or “The Creator” as he is referred to in the film) is angry at what his world has become and intends to wipe out all of humanity in order to start anew. His wrath is communicated to Noah who soon finds himself with the monumental task of not only building an ark so that he and his family can survive, but also gathering two of every animal so that the futures of entire species are assured. Of course, the ark is built, the flood arrives and the dove flies in at the end with the olive branch in its mouth. The basic elements of the story are all here. It’s what Aronofsky does in between and around the core story, however, that gives Noah its unique and intriguing identity. I do not want to spoil the story for anyone so I am going to write anymore about the plot but it is important to remember that this is not a simple retelling of the Bible. It’s a dark, gritty and fantastical adaptation that pulls no punches and presents a portrait of Noah that we’ve never seen before. What Aronofsky gives us will probably offend Biblical purists but with that said, the film is fascinating in every aspect. “Instead of writing Noah as a righteous, honest and upstanding man, the director gives us a complex character study of an almost obsessive follower of God, a zealot, who finds himself at the crossroads between serving a higher power and doing what he thinks is right”. Crowe is excellent but the screenplay by Aronofsky and Ari Handel is what makes the character so interesting. Noah is a man driven by faith and his duty to God. Above all else, he wants to serve God, and he’s willing to do almost anything to complete His will. And when I say anything, I do mean anything. When things get dark, the film ventures into very questionable moral territory. What makes Noah, the character, so interesting is the dichotomy between his actions and beliefs, and the constant struggle between blindly following his faith and doing what he believes is just. We ask these questions ––Is Noah simply carrying out God’s will? How can a mere mortal stand up to the Creator? Isn’t the very foundation of religion based around obeying what God says? Is it wrong if it’s what God commands? The film asks many tough about how far man can be driven by faith, and as a commentary on religious fanaticism; “Noah” is an extremely interesting piece of work. It leaves the viewer with so much to think about that we will have it in our minds for days after seeing it. Aronofsky’s film comes to us in five clear and distinct acts and each has its own special tone and feel. The special effects of the flood are spectacular (as we all thought that they would be). There is a battle sequence that is amazing and the acting is superior throughout the film. Soon after the battle, “Noah” becomes a whole other film entirely. “On the ark, it steps down in scale to examine morality, faith, religious fanaticism, family dynamics and pressure so great that it can sever life-long bonds between loved ones”. Because of excellent direction, the transition is smooth and natural. The film is more than just a film— it is a powerful but complicated experience that’s deeply fascinating in the way it subverts expectations. “It will crash over you like the flood itself, knocking you back, allowing you to take in awe-inspiring visuals but also forcing you to contemplate complex questions. As an absorbing character study and an action epic all at once, it is wonderful. The arrival of the animals, which appear to self-organize by phylum, is a similarly marvelous sight. This followed by the storm that is amazing in its beauty and it will difficult to forget “the image of humanity’s last dregs clambering for a foothold on a lone rocky outcropping as it, too, is finally swallowed by the sea”. After the tide has ebbed and a new day has dawned, the film finds its purpose— Noah, the man is an exhausted hero who can’t understand why, if all mankind was meant to perish, he and his family should be saved. Noah has no one to ask. Russell Crowe lets us feel his torment and then the film leaves us with the image of a man who feels adrift when he is finally standing on dry land — and all of us immediately relate to what we see on the screen.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

    HORRIBLE MOVIE BUT WORTH IT - READ WHY!

    Posted
    KingMidas69
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® MemberMember

    It took no fewer than a minute or two before I knew this movie was going to be a joke. Right when I saw GIANT ROCK GOLEMS in this movie I almost wanted to turn it off and break the blu-ray disc in half or just throw it a few hundred feet away from me. Did I say GIANT ROCK GOLEMS?? What a joke. My cursed curiosity kept me watching throughout this movie. Somehow during the second half of the movie, I felt like I was watching the Shining. Russell Crowe would definitely be a good candidate to reprise Jack Nicholson's role. I forgot to mention before all that drama, someone outside of Noah's family sneaked on-board the Ark! No joke! But what a joke!! There were absolutely more than 3 strikes throughout this movie but I'm running out of space. I still need to mention this - although this film is straight basura, there are pros to it. These two pros are - Steelbook and $10 Movie Ticket!!! I mean although this film is pretty bad, Noah aka Russell Crowe still look bad-a-- on the cover, with the Ark on the back side. I was also glad that this Steelbook Blu-ray + DVD combo came with a $10 Movie Ticket. Just used it on Guardians of the Galaxy and boy does that film blow this one out of the waters and infinity! Having this on Steelbook with a $10 Movie Ticket really makes me forget why I even wasted money on this film. If this movie did not come with any of those bonuses, I would not touch this film with a 10ft. pole. I would actually give this film 1 star, but added 2 stars for the bonuses. Don't say I didn't warn you!

    No, I would not recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Epic Film, Beautiful Blu-ray

    Posted
    adrielaugust
    • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

    For starters, I am not a religious person. I was brought up Christian, and while I do believe in something more powerful than myself, I don't subscribe to any specific religion, science is clearly the logical choice. Religion is not fact or fiction, it simply is what you choose to believe in to guide you as needed through your life. Noah is an adventure movie with action and phenomenal acting. It is beautifully filmed, entertaining and highly enjoyable on all levels. For the religious or non-religious. You must keep an open mind and while we know the story, it has surprises and over-all it is a dark story. Great PQ and AQ. Once the rain starts it gets very dark, and some scenes seem blotchy. But overall a wonderful presentation. Highly Recommended, for the story it tells and the visual pleasure it brings.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    "Noah" is Breathtaking

    Posted
    dramadoctor
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® MemberMember

    NOAH does not necessarily follow the Bible, BUT- It still provides the basic story with a few twists and turns that does not go against Biblical beliefs- embellished for Hollywood and the general public. Great film none the less. The Cinematography was breathtaking and realistic. The Acting was excellent- just watch the relationship between Noah and his daughter-in-law, Iila, grow strong, fall to the depths and heal. Well worth the experience. Just do not go in with too many realistic Biblical ideals, for example: Rock angels that explode. Let me try to help you get through that: Angels fall to Earth and become part of the earth (the soil) and hardened to rock- but still alive and angry. Seeking the goodness that is still part of their spirit (we all fall short of God), they help Noah. At the end, they open up their hearts and souls and let their inner light shine- just before being destroyed and ascending into Heaven- just like Christ.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    A better movie based on the Bible

    Posted
    DraculaDevours
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

    Most of the Biblical movies that I have watched have been very uninteresting and extremely slow moving. This movie only moves as slow as is needed to portray the movement of the times and give the necessary back story (for those who have less familiarity with the bible). The movie does stray from what is written in the Bible but it does so to keep the interest of those of us who do not focus on it. Everyone who I have showed this movie to enjoys it. Even my 7 year old Autistic nephew (who has ADD) sat down and watched most of the movie. Normally, we cannot bribe him to sit for anything. There are special features on the Blu-ray (they show the "beauty" of Iceland, the Ark exterior, and the ark interior) but they were not interesting enough to fit my tastes.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Movie was good.

    Posted
    Lakerist
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® MemberMember

    This was a movie that I really wanted to see because i have been wondering how it would look like compared to previous movies, especially now that we are in the high tech gen. For me, the special effects did not disappoint, especially on how they created all these different kinds of animals going to the ark. That was a joy to watch. The lead character was played really well by Russell Crowe, and nice to see Emma in a character that is far away from what she was known for from her Harry Potter days. I just noticed that the story line was different from what i read from d Bible. I can understand it if was modified to become more commercially appealing, it is meant to entertain and make money. Overall, i give it 4 stars.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    good mythological version of the Bible account

    Posted
    PastorsWife
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase

    Noah is an extremely dramatic retelling of the violent events of a worldwide flood in ancient times. Many cultures have a story similar to the Biblical Old Testament account. This movie incorporates some aspects of other culture's tales in its telling. This does not hurt the basic premise of the evils of mankind. But there is a definite juxtaposition of views on whether man is to "subdue" nature or "protect" it. I am disturbed by Noah's conclusion that this event means all humans must die out and that is part of his mission from God. But it is also logical that we humans can be wrong and can learn that justice is also tempered with mercy.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

    not the bible version!

    Posted
    JTeal
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase

    What would happen if Noah met Gandalf? A whole lot of special fx! Only loosely based on some characters in Genesis, the whole story takes on a Peter Jackson atmosphere with fallen angels that become rock monsters out of Galaxy Quest, an anti abortion subtext, animals that never made it onto the ark, a dangerous and treacherous stowaway, and an angry mob dispatched like a battle scene from the Two Towers. They have taken a page from the bible and folded it into an origami video, fun to look at, but with only some of the original words visible. Recommended as an interesting comparison to the original.

    I would recommend this to a friend



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