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Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb [DVD] [2014]

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    Overview

    Ratings & Reviews


    Overall Customer Rating:
    98% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (1707 out of 1759)

    Special Features


    • Deleted/extended scenes
    • Improv, absurdity, and cracking up - the comedy of Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb
    • Gallery

    Synopsis


    Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb
    Ben Stiller and director Shawn Levy return for more after-hours mayhem in this third outing of the successful Night at the Museum series. When the magic that brings the exhibits to life begins to fade, Larry (Ben Stiller) rallies his historical friends for a trip to London and the adventure of a lifetime. Owen Wilson, Steve Coogan, Ricky Gervais, and Rebel Wilson co-star. ~ Jeremy Wheeler, Rovi

    Cast & Crew


    • Ben Stiller
      Ben Stiller - Larry Daley
    • Robin Williams
      Robin Williams - Teddy Roosevelt
    • Owen Wilson
      Owen Wilson - Jedediah
    • Steve Coogan
      Steve Coogan - Octavius
    • Ricky Gervais
      Ricky Gervais - Dr. McPhee



    Customer rating

    Rating 4.5 out of 5 stars with 1759 reviews

    98%
    would recommend to a friend
    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      One Last Night

      Posted
      segeld
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      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      This is the third and perhaps last of the "Night in the Museum" series, featuring Ben Stiller as Larry Daley, the night watchman at an American Museum of Natural History which comes to life each night. Much of the cast from the first two movies returns, along with a few new characters. In this outing, Larry discovers the magic tablet which animates the people and animals at the museum seems to be running out of juice. A couple of clues lead him to Cecil Fredericks (Dick Van Dyck), the former night watchman, who gives Larry a reason to go to London's British Museum. The expedition to London turns into a madcap scramble around the British Museum, dodging its animals and characters come to life, through a performance of "Camelot" (featuring Hugh Jackman as King Arthur), and finally to a rooftop showdown over the tablet with Lancelot from the Knights of the Round Table (an excellent Dan Stevens). Along the way, Larry must deal with a teenage son who doesn't want to go to college, a boss who loses his job over Larry, and a bored British security guard who gets in the way in London. The ending is bittersweet, as Larry decides to move on with his life, and as the audience knows this was the final movie appearance for Robin Williams and for Mickey Rooney. However, there is plenty of fun left in the franchise, with sight gags galore and the impressive CGI that makes it all work. Recommended as decent entertainment.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Bittersweet ending...

      Posted
      AandJ091108
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember
      • Top 500 ContributorTop 500 Contributor

      This is the third and perhaps last of the "Night in the Museum" series, featuring Ben Stiller as Larry Daley, the night watchman at an American Museum of Natural History which comes to life each night. Much of the cast from the first two movies returns, along with a few new characters. In this outing, Larry discovers the magic tablet which animates the people and animals at the museum seems to be running out of juice. A couple of clues lead him to Cecil Fredericks (Dick Van Dyck), the former night watchman, who gives Larry a reason to go to London's British Museum. The expedition to London turns into a madcap scramble around the British Museum, dodging its animals and characters (especially Dan Stevens as Lancelot) come to life, through a performance of "Camelot" (featuring Hugh Jackman as King Arthur), and finally to a rooftop showdown over the tablet. Along the way, Larry must deal with a teenage son who doesn't want to go to college, a boss who loses his job over Larry, and a bored British security guard who gets in the way in London. The ending is bittersweet, as the audience knows this was the final movie appearance for Robin Williams and for Mickey Rooney. However, there is plenty of fun left in the franchise, with sight gags galore and the impressive CGI that makes it all work. Recommended as decent entertainment.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Great conclusion to an underrated trilogy

      Posted
      Scarecrow09
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      I find the Night at the Museum movies to be criminally underrated. I've always been a big fan of Ben Stiller, but these movies are really special for some reason. The first one came out when I was about 15, so I don't think they appeal only to kids (and it's not a childhood nostalgia thing) and I've enjoyed each one immensely. The casting is fantastic, too, and this one is no exception. I know some people aren't on board with Rebel Wilson's schtick, but I think she's awesome and hilarious. The storyline in this one is a little more involving than the last, and it makes more sense with the continuity of the others. Speaking of continuity: the only complaint about these films is that it is non-existent when it comes to Larry (Stiller) and his personal life. In the first one, he falls for a woman who works with the museum (Carla Gugino's character). In the second, she's nowhere to be found but he runs into a Amelia Earhart look-alike (both played by Amy Adams) and presumably falls for her. In the third, neither are present, and Larry kind of ends up alone (with his son, anyway). That was never a big part of the story, though, so it's not really a big deal in the end. The movies may have received mixed reviews and okay returns at the box office, but as long as fans are enjoying the films, I think that's all that really matters.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Very fun and entertaining... Robin William's R.I.P

      Posted
      Stylez
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      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      The third part in what absolutely no one is calling the Night at the Museum “trilogy” turns out to be a good-natured and entertainingly surreal panto fantasy, set partly in London’s British Museum, with nice cameos from Dan Stevens as Sir Lancelot and Rebel Wilson as Tilly, the stroppy, sulky museum guard. An opening flashback makes it clear that an explorer’s century-old defilement of an Egyptian tomb has triggered a delayed curse: an ancient tablet – resembling a keypad – is failing in its magical power to bring the museum exhibits to life. No one is enough of a spoilsport to point out that the “Epyptian curse” trope was an imperial fiction invented to stigmatise the Egyptians as irrational and malign. To rectify things, Ben Stiller’s long-suffering guard, promoted to the director of what he’s passing off as “special effects”, must take his entire gang to London to talk to the ancient Egyptians there. Perhaps inevitably, this means a high-camp cameo as a pharoah for Ben Kingsley, and there are loads more wacky walk-ons. It’s all likable fun, and includes a bizarre sequence set inside an MC Escher drawing. There is some sharp, unintended pathos from the late Robin Williams, making his swansong as Teddy Roosevelt.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      It's about as good as the first movie

      Posted
      MyNameIsNotBaymax
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      I really enjoyed this movie. It has the same type of humor as the first two movies in the series without necessarily repeating jokes, but it still gives you more of what you want, if that makes any sense. It's what movie sequels strive to be - more of the same but different. They make great use of old favorite characters while still introducing new ones, and there are many laugh-out-loud moments. It is also a nice wrap-up of the series, which makes it sad, but they did a great job of making sure it's not TOO sad to say goodbye to these great, lovable characters. And also watching it as Robin Williams' last film performance makes it extra poignant, but fitting and a nice way to sort of say goodbye to him as well. There are also some special features on the blu-ray, which is very cool. More and more movies get are doing fewer special features nowadays, so I'm glad to see there's a good number of them here. I haven't watched them yet, though, but one is an audio commentary by Shawn Levy, who always does a great job of explaining what they did behind the scenes to get a particular shot or performance, cool stories on set, and sort of teaching you how to be a filmmaker. So I'm looking forward to listening to it.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

      Better Than The 2nd

      Posted
      reviewinlu
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      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

      If your like me than you were surprised to see the "Night at the Museum" franchise return this past year after a little while away from release of the second film, it would have seemed maybe there would be a third picture, but alas it came in due time. By now there's a formula to these movies and this one is much the same, its debatable if this third and perhaps final film in the franchise is better than the first but I think its fairly easily better than the second. Ben Stiller does his Ben Stiller thing, at times almost coasting through the 90 minutes runtime and the supporting cast is serviceable as well. Rebel Wilson particularly seems to be giving it her all to provide a comedic performance. Its a little sad that this one will go down as Robin Williams final film but its not because he doesn't give a good showing its because he's unfortunately trapped in the Teddy Roosevelt character box. Obviously these Museum movies are more geared to the younger crowd but there are moments in Secret of the Tomb that will possibly give the older viewer a chuckle.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

      Decent ending to a fun trilogy

      Posted
      coverstory
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      Night at the Museum 3 is a decent ending to am inventive and colorful trilogy, Ben Stiller reprises his role as Larry the Night watchman who rides herd over a bunch of museum exhibits that only come alive at night thanks to an ancient Egyptian tablet. We finally learn the origins of the tablet and its powers in this effects filled adventure. Robin Williams is great in his final role as a wax version of Teddy Roosevelt, but I'm afraid the true star of the film is Dexter the little monkey with a very active bladder. I'll leave that for the viewers to discover for themselves. The film is a treasure trove of CGI effects that dazzle the eye and pop from the screen. Moving the action to London adds a bit of freshness to the script and the addition of Rebel Wilson as Larry's English counterpart is hilarious. The film leaves us with a serious message about growing up and letting go that makes it worthwhile family viewing.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

      Robin Williams goodbye to us

      Posted
      Mamo
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      I enjoyed the movie and treasured Robin Williams' last performance in the series. The only issue I had was the monkey urinating scenes. I'm just not into potty humor. As far as a movie to take your children to, I liked the father/son story lines. People can relate to being a single parent and a young adult trying to find his way. Jedediah and Octavious are predictably entertaining and offer offer insight into friendship as do the characters of Cecil and Gus. It was refreshing to meet a new character in Sir Lancelot. And of course no one else can sell a believable Pharaoh like Ben Kingsley. A star-studded film indeed, I loved the reference to The Wolverine. The viewer is bewitched from the opening scene till the very end.

      I would recommend this to a friend



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