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The Imitation Game [Includes Digital Copy] [UltraViolet] [Blu-ray] [2014]

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    Overview

    Ratings & Reviews


    Overall Customer Rating:
    99% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (706 out of 716)

    Special Features


    • Feature commentary with director Morten Tyldum and screenwriter Graham Moore
    • The making of The Imitation Game
    • Deleted scenes
    • Q&A Highlights

    Synopsis


    The Imitation Game
    Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Alan Turing, the brilliant UK mathematician and computer scientist who helped the Allies secure victory in World War II by cracking the German enigma code, and who was later prosecuted as a homosexual by his own government. Keira Knightley, Rory Kinnear, Mark Strong, Matthew Goode, Matthew Beard, and Charles Dance co-star in this biographical drama from director Morten Tyldum (Headhunters)., Rovi

    Cast & Crew


    • Benedict Cumberbatch
      Benedict Cumberbatch - Alan Turing
    • Keira Knightley
      Keira Knightley - Joan Clarke
    • Allen Leech
      Allen Leech - John Cairncross
    • Rory Kinnear
      Rory Kinnear - Detective Robert Nock
    • Mark Strong
      Mark Strong - Stewart Menzies



    Customer rating

    Rating 4.7 out of 5 stars with 716 reviews

    99%
    would recommend to a friend

    Most relevant reviews

    See all customer reviews
    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      You Only Think You're In Control

      Posted
      MysteryShopper
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      When “The Imitation Game” begins we hear the narrator set the mood for a dire story. He informs us to pay attention, he will not repeat himself, and to make no mistake about the current situation; just because he's in jail does NOT mean he isn't the one holding the cards! This is, in a way, director Morten Tyldum making a statement that he is going to give us a challenging movie. It won't gift wrap itself for an audience and it will force you to use your brain, so you better pay attention or you will regret it. Such a claim early on is risky because the product needs to deliver on that promise, and the audience will not forgive you if you can't do that. So confident is this statement though, that “The Imitation Game” is more than able to back up this initial promise, and in many ways goes beyond that initial promise by delivering not only a complicated story, but a very human story about a forgotten man. That man is Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch#, a math genius who is applying for a position with the British government that is, shall we say, not a matter of public record. It is World War II, and the German's are winning the war with much efficiency and ease. A large part of this is because they have developed a complicated communication tool known as Enigma, which delivers messages over the radio airwaves in a special code that appears to be unbreakable. The code is so fool proof that the British Army actually have an Enigma communication machine on hand and they STILL can't crack it! Alan is an anti-social man who is brilliant in statistics, but seems unable to comprehend basic human interaction #for all we know he may have Asperger's#. Hated though he is, he might be the only one who can actually figure out how the Enigma code actually works and design a machine that can combat it. Despite his superiors not liking the man very much, he does have lots of radical ideas and manages to bring on several people who can at least bounce theories off of him. The most notable team member is the sole female of the group, Joan Clarke #Kiera Knightley#, who has difficulty getting through the front door by Alan's superiors on the basis that she is female, but who proves to be the only one who seems to match his intellect #as well as crossword puzzle skills#. Their relationship is an interesting one. Alan does everything he can to keep Clarke staffed, as she is the only one he seems to relate to, but their relationship always seems a little off. He visits her house at night and even performs the mating ritual of tossing stones at her window to alert her of his presence, but once he is let inside her room they spend the night discussing radio frequencies and numbers as opposed to human anatomy. Later we learn that Alan is gay, and keeps this secret as it is illegal for people to be gay at this point in time. The movie states this as a matter-of-fact but doesn't seem that interested in his sexuality for the most part. The screenplay is far more interested in the process of Alan making his Enigma cracking machine #code named Christopher), his utter devotion to this object, and how, in a very sad way, this is the most intimate relationship he has in his life. Heck, Alan himself doesn't seem that interested in his own sexuality. You'd think the movie would have a solid opinion on this state of mind, yet it wisely keeps this revelation at arm's length and lets us come to our own conclusion on how we feel about these events. All of this is held together by Cumberbatch's performance, which isn't really that different from his character on “Sherlock,” but fits this movie perfectly none-the-less. What makes the movie so interesting from beginning to end is that the promise of having to pay attention is on full display. The movie never visualizes Alan's inner thought process, nor does it give us an “in” to his world. We are simply watching a process. There is a man behind it, but he is so reclusive and stand offish that it's hard for us to relate to him. What “The Imitation Game” does do is make us emphasize with a troubled human being and bad situation. For all the great things this man did to help win the war, he died a lonely and broken man, never thanked for his contributions and forced to live a hellish final few years because of his sexuality. What may be up for debate is whether “The Imitation Game” is a war thriller or a character drama. In some ways it's neither, and in some ways it's both. Which makes it a fascinating conundrum of a film. Kevin T. Rodríguez The Movie Wizard.com

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      You Only Think You're In Control

      Posted
      MysteryShopper
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      When “The Imitation Game” begins we hear the narrator set the mood for a dire story. He informs us to pay attention, he will not repeat himself, and to make no mistake about the current situation; just because he's in jail does NOT mean he isn't the one holding the cards! This is, in a way, director Morten Tyldum making a statement that he is going to give us a challenging movie. It won't gift wrap itself for an audience and it will force you to use your brain, so you better pay attention or you will regret it. Such a claim early on is risky because the product needs to deliver on that promise, and the audience will not forgive you if you can't do that. So confident is this statement though, that “The Imitation Game” is more than able to back up this initial promise, and in many ways goes beyond that initial promise by delivering not only a complicated story, but a very human story about a forgotten man. That man is Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch#, a math genius who is applying for a position with the British government that is, shall we say, not a matter of public record. It is World War II, and the German's are winning the war with much efficiency and ease. A large part of this is because they have developed a complicated communication tool known as Enigma, which delivers messages over the radio airwaves in a special code that appears to be unbreakable. The code is so fool proof that the British Army actually have an Enigma communication machine on hand and they STILL can't crack it! Alan is an anti-social man who is brilliant in statistics, but seems unable to comprehend basic human interaction #for all we know he may have Asperger's#. Hated though he is, he might be the only one who can actually figure out how the Enigma code actually works and design a machine that can combat it. Despite his superiors not liking the man very much, he does have lots of radical ideas and manages to bring on several people who can at least bounce theories off of him. The most notable team member is the sole female of the group, Joan Clarke #Kiera Knightley#, who has difficulty getting through the front door by Alan's superiors on the basis that she is female, but who proves to be the only one who seems to match his intellect #as well as crossword puzzle skills#. Their relationship is an interesting one. Alan does everything he can to keep Clarke staffed, as she is the only one he seems to relate to, but their relationship always seems a little off. He visits her house at night and even performs the mating ritual of tossing stones at her window to alert her of his presence, but once he is let inside her room they spend the night discussing radio frequencies and numbers as opposed to human anatomy. Later we learn that Alan is gay, and keeps this secret as it is illegal for people to be gay at this point in time. The movie states this as a matter-of-fact but doesn't seem that interested in his sexuality for the most part. The screenplay is far more interested in the process of Alan making his Enigma cracking machine #code named Christopher), his utter devotion to this object, and how, in a very sad way, this is the most intimate relationship he has in his life. Heck, Alan himself doesn't seem that interested in his own sexuality. You'd think the movie would have a solid opinion on this state of mind, yet it wisely keeps this revelation at arm's length and lets us come to our own conclusion on how we feel about these events. All of this is held together by Cumberbatch's performance, which isn't really that different from his character on “Sherlock,” but fits this movie perfectly none-the-less. What makes the movie so interesting from beginning to end is that the promise of having to pay attention is on full display. The movie never visualizes Alan's inner thought process, nor does it give us an “in” to his world. We are simply watching a process. There is a man behind it, but he is so reclusive and stand offish that it's hard for us to relate to him. What “The Imitation Game” does do is make us emphasize with a troubled human being and bad situation. For all the great things this man did to help win the war, he died a lonely and broken man, never thanked for his contributions and forced to live a hellish final few years because of his sexuality. What may be up for debate is whether “The Imitation Game” is a war thriller or a character drama. In some ways it's neither, and in some ways it's both. Which makes it a fascinating conundrum of a film. Kevin T. Rodríguez The Movie Wizard.com

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Dramatic And Riveting

      Posted
      wisdomseeker
      • Top 100 ContributorTop 100 Contributor

      I eventually decided to take a chance on seeing Imitation Game after seeing it featured enough times at my job. For some strange reason, I was also curious to know more about the story behind the character (Alan Turing) that Benedict Cumberbatch was playing and the one that Keira Knight was playing (Joan Clarke). Both Turing and Clarke collaborated together during their professional/decryption work that was indirectly affiliated with helping to stop World War II. I understand that the movie is not a direct representation of what actually happened. However, one informative aspect tied into how the film carefully tied certain events into the work that they were doing (such as the heart-wrenching scene where Turing has to tell his coworker that they must withhold certain news even with the lucid awareness of one of their family members being on a certain sub). Additionally,I know that you are not supposed to use Wikipedia (academically speaking) as a guaranteed reference. However, if the birthdates cited are correct, it is interesting to note that their birthdays were just one day apart from each other (Clark and Turing’s birthdates). Anyhow, this is a good movie for those who are open to watch films indirectly related to key events in history and/or a case study in a person who did their best to endure being different from others in a time period that appeared to show contempt towards anybody outside of the mainstream.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      The Adventures of Christopher The Computer

      Posted
      MarkTwainTimeTraveler
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      I was recommended this film by a friend and definitely enjoyed it over-all. Top-notch acting with an excellent cast, especially with Benedict Cumberbatch portraying Alan Turing, in a more unusual story of cryptoanalysis during WW2. While the film is brilliantly laid out and has excellent filmography, it is one of those films that pretends it is a "true story," which more accurately should be labeled as "sort of" or "loosely." Alan Turing was a real man, but in this film he is portrayed as somewhat Autistic with Asperberger's where he has difficulty understanding social situations. The film also makes you think Cumberbatch's Turing built the Turing machine ("Christopher") on his own, but he was truly assisted by Gordon Welchman who is not in the film at all. A 5 star film on its own, but a 3 or 4 five star film for taking too many liberties from a historical perspective. The historical inaccuracies of the character won't stop you from enjoying the film, but I do recommend reading about the real Alan Turing so you know what is real and what is not in this portrayal.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Great war movie, even without the war

      Posted
      bobogirth1
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      This is probably the best war movie that shows that shows that what a select few did without ever firing a bullet did to saves countless lives. I love the little snippets of war scenes put in, but the real story was that of Turing. I really hope people realize how much of a genius this man was. If he were able to live out his life normally and continue his work, we would have easily been decades ahead of our current technology scheme now. We would have had computers probably as humans were landing on the moon and we would have been on the moon probably a decade or so earlier. It's people like Turing that change the world and it's so unfortunate that he lived in a time like that to shorten his genius. I thought the really genius part of the movie was after they broke Enigma how they had to keep THAT a secret so the Germans didn't catch on. Great film.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      A Suspenseful Spy/Espionage tale

      Posted
      cwlw
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      This film, which was based on actual events, is a suspenseful Spy/Espionage tale that holds your attention throughout its’ length. The story-line is coupled with a marvelous and talented cast who acted their characters in a believable manner. Flashbacks are used extensively throughout to tie this story-line together. The events of this film were portrayed in a historically correct manner; and it’s a provocative account as-well-as celebrating people who have differences. It also deftly tells the saga of cracking the German Enigma Code with “Christopher,” the de-code machine developed by Alan Turing who was a young British genius Mathematician – lots of Spies, Counter-Spies, Lies, Co-Lies and Intrigue at its best.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Library quality movie

      Posted
      EricL63
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      For a historical piece, this movie hits all the highpoints (and some of the lowpoints as well). The writing, even for the smaller characters, is excellent. The story line provides a good re-telling of history, and why we may not have been aware of Alan Turing and his contributions to the war efforts. The video is near reference quality, and although the sound is very good, not quite reference quality for a Blu-ray. But that is understandable considering this is not a Michael Bay movie... The extras are very good, but shorter than I expected for this type of movie. I couldn't wait to pick this copy up and consider it a must-own for the library.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Great and compelling movie.

      Posted
      pogikunu

      I have seen this movie from Showtime and or HBO,multiple times. The Director had done a great job of making the film compelling to watch from beginning to end together with a great cast of actors/ actresses who did an excellent job on portraying their respective characters. I know of Alan Turing from computer books that cited his success in cracking enigma which we now enjoy on proliferation of computer in our every day lives but not to the extent what the movie narrated. Alan character alone is so compelling and so complex like a Greek tragedy. A must watch movies from those tired of watching films inundated with high tech.

      I would recommend this to a friend



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