5 Film Collection: Music Movies [DVD]

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Overview

Synopsis

Rock of Ages
A small-town girl and a big-city boy find their fates intersecting on the Sunset Strip, riding a wave of romance through the height of the "hair metal" scene as the off-Broadway musical rocks its way to the big screen courtesy of choreographer-turned-director Adam Shankman (A Walk to Remember, Hairspray). Arriving in Hollywood with stars in her eyes, Sherrie (Julianne Hough) meets Drew (Diego Boneta), and together they plunge headlong into the local rock scene. Meanwhile, as Sherrie struggles to stay afloat in a churning sea of rock 'n' roll excess, she gets swept off her feet by audacious rock star Stacee Jaxx (Tom Cruise). Russell Brand, Paul Giamatti, and Bryan Cranston co-star in a movie featuring music by Journey, Def Leppard, Poison, Whitesnake, Bon Jovi, Foreigner, Joan Jett, and REO Speedwagon. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

Little Shop of Horrors
It started as a 1960 Roger Corman horror comedy, filmed in two days; it then inspired a lavish 1982 Broadway musical with music and lyrics by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman. Finally in 1986, Little Shop of Horrors (1960) graduated into a multimillion-dollar, all-star film musical. Rick Moranis plays nebbishy Seymour Krelborn, who works in a rundown flower shop on Skid Row. While his boss (Vincent Gardenia) bemoans the lack of business, Seymour seeks a way of bringing the shop -- and himself -- fame and fortune. He purchases a strange plant from an even stranger oriental street vendor (Vincent Wong), naming the plant after his girlfriend Audrey (Ellen Greene, one of the few carry-overs from the Broadway version). Gradually, Seymour learns to his horror that "Audrey II" (given the voice of R&B performer Levi Stubbs) craves blood and flesh. With each of Audrey II's "FEEED MEEE"s, Seymour must scare up human food to satisfy the plant's appetite. One such victim is dentist Steve Martin, a leather-jacketed Elvis type (the dentist's ultra-masochistic patient played by Jack Nicholson in the 1960 original is here impersonated by Bill Murray). The lighthearted tone of the film darkens as Audrey II grows in monstrosity, but the unhappy ending of the Broadway version is avoided herein. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi

Hairspray
Adam Shankman's adaptation of the stage musical Hairspray, itself an adaptation of the non-musical John Waters film of the same name, stars Nikki Blonsky as Tracy Turnblad, an overweight high-school student whose only dream is to be on a local Baltimore teen dance program. While her father (Christopher Walken) tells her to follow her dreams, her mother Edna (John Travolta in drag) reminds her that she doesn't look like the girls on that show. After impressing the show's host (James Marsden), Tracy earns a coveted spot on the program, but when she becomes a popular addition to the cast, she earns the wrath of the prettiest girl in school -- a girl whose mother (Michelle Pfeiffer) just happens to operate the local television station. Tracy's visit to detention hall opens her eyes to the racial tension on the show, as does the budding relationship between her best friend (Amanda Bynes) and an African-American boy named Seaweed (Elijah Kelley). Thus empowered, Tracy attempts to integrate the races on her favorite program. ~ Perry Seibert, Rovi

Joyful Noise
This light, gentle comedy from director Todd Graff stars Dolly Parton and Queen Latifah in the tale of a small-town choir determined to win a national choral competition. As the choir leaders, G.G. Sparrow and Vi Rose Hill (Parton and Latifah) band together and set out to win at any cost, supported by their eager young participants (Jeremy Jordan, Keke Palmer and others). ~ Nathan Southern, Rovi

Jersey Boys
Adapted from the 2006 Tony Winner for Best Musical, this bittersweet saga dramatizes the rise and fall of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons - one of the key pop groups of the early '60s, responsible for such iconic hits as "Sherry," "Walk Like a Man" and "Big Girls Don't Cry." The story opens in New Jersey, where young Francesco Castelluccio (John Lloyd Young) and his buddies face a narrow window of future career options. Their possible paths include show business on one hand and organized crime on the other, embodied by the slightly menacing yet avuncular kingpin, Angelo "Gyp" DeCarlo (Christopher Walken), who runs the neighborhood and keeps an eye on them. The boys begin to nurture dreams of becoming musical stars, goals that seem far out of reach until they invite Francesco to perform with them in their band, then rename him Frankie Valli; his unique falsetto vocals captivate the girls in the audience, which provides a sign of things to come. The young hopefuls sign a contract at the Brill Building and begin doing backup vocals for record producer Bob Crewe (Mike Doyle), but experience frustration when Crewe drags his feet on recording them as a solo act. Later, the performers name themselves The Four Seasons after feeling inspired by an unusual source. They add songwriter-musician Bob Gaudio (Erich Bergen) and the equation is complete; Crewe hears Gaudio's composition "Sherry," decides to double-track Valli's voice, and helps create a national sensation. Later, however, certain difficulties begin to take their toll on the band - including financial problems, inner rivalries and tensions between the bandmates, and Valli's long periods on the road away from his wife and daughters. Clint Eastwood directs, from a screenplay by the co-authors of the original musical, Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice. ~ Nathan Southern, Rovi

Cast & Crew

  • Julianne Hough
    Julianne Hough - Sherrie Christian
  • Diego Boneta
    Diego Boneta - Drew Boley
  • Russell Brand
    Russell Brand - Lonny
  • Paul Giamatti
    Paul Giamatti - Paul Gill
  • Catherine Zeta-Jones
    Catherine Zeta-Jones - Patricia Whitmore
Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.