Kong: Skull Island [3D] [Blu-ray] [Blu-ray/Blu-ray 3D] [2017]

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    Overview

    Ratings & Reviews


    Overall Customer Rating:
    98% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (4900 out of 5044)

    Special Features


    • (Companion Archive): dive deep into the organization and MonsterVerse mythology
    • And more!
    • Creating a King: a 2-part exploration of the rebirth and re-creation of an iconic monster
    • Deleted scenes
    • Director's commentary
    • Monarch Files 2.0
    • Tom Hiddleston: The Intrepid Traveler: join the actor on a tour of the film's breathtaking locations

    Synopsis


    Kong: Skull Island
    A secret government organization mounts an expedition to Skull Island, an uncharted territory in the Pacific. Led by an explorer (John Goodman) and a lieutenant colonel (Samuel L. Jackson), the group recruit a disillusioned soldier (Tom Hiddleston) and a photojournalist (Brie Larson) to investigate the island's peculiar seismic activity. But once there, they discover that Skull Island is home to a gigantic ape called King Kong, and find themselves caught up in an ongoing war between the beast and the area's indigenous predators. Jordan Vogt-Roberts directed this reboot of the classic monster franchise. ~ Daniel Gelb, Rovi

    Cast & Crew


    • Tom Hiddleston
      Tom Hiddleston - James Conrad
    • Samuel L. Jackson
      Samuel L. Jackson - Preston Packard
    • John Goodman
      John Goodman - Bill Randa
    • Brie Larson
      Brie Larson - Mason Weaver
    • Jing Tian
      Jing Tian - San



    Customer rating

    4.6
    98%
    would recommend to a friend
    • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

      A well made, entertaining re-boot with sequels to

      Posted
      MichaelO
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      Chance of a spoiler. Well, I guess with this film and the recently released Marvel film, “Logan,” summer blockbusters have moved up to early March now. This story originated in 1933 with the RKO masterpiece that saved the studio from bankruptcy. This re-telling is different from a story line perspective but consistent with the idea. Director Jordan Vogt-Roberts has only one other big screen film to his credit. That was the excellent low-budget indie, “The Kings of Summer” (2013). Needless to say, he gets a lot more money to play with here. Bill Randa (John Goodman) and his science partner Houston Brooks (Corey Hawkins) have discovered a new island in the China Sea. It is constantly surrounded by violent storms and has never been explored. He needs money and approaches a U. S. Senator (Richard Jenkins) to get funding for an exploration. He also needs a military escort, not knowing what they might find. The film is set in 1973 as Nixon was closing the curtain on the Vietnam War. A gung-ho Lt. Colonel Packard (Samuel L. Jackson) isn’t too happy pulling out without winning, but is given the chance to lead this expedition. Randa also wants a “tracker” and enlists a former British special forces officer, James Conrad (Tom Hiddleston) for the job. A wartime photo-journalist named Mason Weaver (Brie Larson), goes along to document what they find. Things move along quite quickly as the ship, outfitted to carry several helicopters, closes in on the mysterious Skull Island. Unlike the original 1933 film and remake of 2005, we don’t have to wait long to see Kong. As the Huey’s break through the storm to a quiet tropical island, we’re reminded of “Apocalypse Now” but instead of “Flight of the Valkyries” we get some Credence Clearwater Revival. In fact we get a playlist of hits of the time throughout the movie including Jefferson Airplane, David Bowie, Iggy Pop, The Hollies, The Chambers Brothers and more. As the helicopters drop some seismic charges to the surface (to check the geology or something), it also stirs the 100 foot Kong to find out what’s what. Under Packard’s lead the helicopters charge the giant gorilla instead of retreating. Bad idea, the first of several by the delusional commander. While I had a hard time adapting to the fire-breathing Jackson as Packard, I had no problem with John C. Reilly as Hank Marlow. Marlow and his Japanese counterpart had nearly killed each other, having crashed on the island in the later part of WW II. They somehow survived, taken in by some natives. Marlow brings some needed comedic relief to the film. He also knows a lot about the island, something Packard usually dismisses. When asked about the high walls surrounding the village, Marlow says that it isn’t to keep Kong out. Kong is perceived as a god protecting them from the giant “skullcrawlers” who look like a light skinned, larger and quicker moving crocodile. Other various creatures tend to pick off the surviving crew as you might expect, which leads up to the epic battle between an already seriously wounded Kong and the largest of the skullcrawlers. And it’s a good one. Using a variety of special effects tricks, it all comes across realistically. And yes, there are moments of Kong’s loneliness and lack of a mate, especially when he confronts the beautiful photographer. Toby Kebbell gets some good moments as one of the military officers, injured and alone. Shea Whigham plays another Army grunt with a quick wit. Tian Jing plays San, one of the scientists. She isn’t given much to do but would appear to be bait for the Asian audience. The film isn’t perfect but it is much better than it could have been. The acting is very good and the action sequences are excellent. Recommended.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

      King Kong returns...and he's really big!

      Posted
      MikeO
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      Well, I guess with this film and the recently released Marvel film, “Logan,” summer blockbusters have moved up to early March now. This story originated in 1933 with the RKO masterpiece that saved the studio from bankruptcy. This re-telling is different from a story line perspective but consistent with the idea. Director Jordan Vogt-Roberts has only one other big screen film to his credit. That was the excellent low-budget indie, “The Kings of Summer” (2013). Needless to say, he gets a lot more money to play with here. Bill Randa (John Goodman) and his science partner Houston Brooks (Corey Hawkins) have discovered a new island in the China Sea. It is constantly surrounded by violent storms and has never been explored. He needs money and approaches a U. S. Senator (Richard Jenkins) to get funding for an exploration. He also needs a military escort, not knowing what they might find. The film is set in 1973 as Nixon was closing the curtain on the Vietnam War. A gung-ho Lt. Colonel Packard (Samuel L. Jackson) isn’t too happy pulling out without winning, but is given the chance to lead this expedition. Randa also wants a “tracker” and enlists a former British special forces officer, James Conrad (Tom Hiddleston) for the job. A wartime photo-journalist named Mason Weaver (Brie Larson), goes along to document what they find. Things move along quite quickly as the ship outfitted to carry several helicopters closes in on the mysterious Skull Island. Unlike the original 1933 film and remake of 2005, we don’t have to wait long to see Kong. As the Huey’s break through the storm to a quiet tropical island, we’re reminded of “Apocalypse Now” but instead of “Flight of the Valkyries” we get some Credence Clearwater Revival. In fact we get a playlist of hits of the time throughout the movie including Jefferson Airplane, David Bowie, Iggy Pop, The Hollies, The Chambers Brothers and more. As the helicopters drop some seismic charges to the surface (to check the geology or something), it also stirs the 100 foot Kong to find out what’s what. Under Packard’s lead the helicopters charge the giant gorilla instead of retreating. Bad idea, the first of several by the delusional commander. While I had a hard time adapting to the fire-breathing Jackson as Packard, I had no problem with John C. Reilly as Hank Marlow. Marlow and his Japanese counterpart had nearly killed each other, having crashed on the island in the later part of WW II. They somehow survived, taken in by some natives. Marlow brings some needed comedic relief to the film. He also knows a lot about the island, something Packard usually dismisses. When asked about the high walls surrounding the village, Marlow says that it isn’t to keep Kong out. Kong is perceived as a god protecting them from the giant “skullcrawlers” who look like a light skinned and quicker moving crocodile. Other various creatures tend to pick off the surviving crew as you might expect, which leads up to the epic battle between an already seriously wounded Kong and the largest of the skullcrawlers. And it’s a good one. Using a variety of special effects tricks, it all comes across realistically. And yes, there are moments of Kong’s loneliness and lack of a mate, especially when he confronts the beautiful photographer. Toby Kebbell gets some good moments as one of the military officers, injured and alone. Shea Whigham plays another Army grunt with a quick wit. Tian Jing plays San, one of the scientists. She isn’t given much to do but would appear to be bait for the Asian audience. The film isn’t perfect but it is much better than it could have been. The acting is very good and the action sequences are excellent. Recommended.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

      A Care-Free, Fun Time

      Posted
      VandyPrice
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      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member
      • Top 1000 ContributorTop 1000 Contributor

      In the vein of Marc Webb going from (500) Days of Summer to The Amazing Spider-Man and Colin Trevorrow from the quaint Safety Not Guaranteed to Jurassic World, Warner Bros. and Legendary Pictures have plucked indie director Jordan Vogt-Roberts from the safety of his summer getaway that he so lovingly crafted in his 2013 break-out, The Kings of Summer, and thrust him into the world of blockbusters with literally one of the biggest stars in Hollywood history: King Kong. In an effort to re-boot the property that hasn't been touched since Peter "Lord of the Rings" Jackson's epic attempt in 2005 and build a cinematic universe a la Marvel with Gareth Edwards 2014 iteration of Godzilla, WB and Legendary have given Vogt-Roberts the keys to Skull Island AKA the home of the titular Kong and several other species of creatures, most of which are prehistoric in nature, but in other cases-are species that come straight from the pages of an old school horror/fantasy novel. A place where those who own the earth really reside, the place that God forgot to finish. The place where not only a human tribe somehow still resides, but so is there proof of dinosaurs, of more than one Kong, and of devils from the deep that the best character in the film affectionately refers to as "skullcrawlers". And so, the question is-what has the director done with such an environment to elevate the mythology it inherently carries? What has he done to give this mythical island a real sense of place and of substance and of tangibility? Well, the answer to that question is more positive than what the response might be to, "How good is the movie overall?" as the movie itself is pleasant and fun enough, but the real value in the piece comes from seeing that of Kong do what audiences want to see him do on a large scale and creating a full-on world in which these unbelievably thin characters and rote plot exist. It is because this world in which these things exist does indeed feel so lived in and palpable that much is forgiven. Even the special effect that is Kong himself holds more weight and authenticity than one might expect with the film eliciting a real soul from the beast which is more than it can say for the majority of its human cast. This is all to say that Kong: Skull Island certainly has its issues and could benefit from having at least one protagonist other than the movie's eponymous monster that we could sympathize with, but in a strange turn of events the spectacle holds more significance than the non-existent emotions and ideas it seems to have never had any ambition of carrying. In that regard, this is very much decent enough popcorn entertainment-fine if not completely forgettable.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

      Great start for Kong in Monsterverse

      Posted
      doc8998
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      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

      Off the bat: If you're expecting anything remotely close to Peter Jackson's 2005 movie, you're probably going to end up disappointed. This isn't a movie interested in telling a great story, although it hits the mark if you confine it to "giant monster action movies". It's not even the same species as the Kong from PJ's retelling. As a setup for the eventual crossover between Godzilla and Kong, Skull Island hits the marks, and in some ways, does so better than the recent Godzilla film. There's less downtime and more humor. (And, if you're a Chicago Cubs fan, there's several meta-jokes you'll get a kick out of, as well). The action is extremely satisfying, although I found the monster vs monster fighting (and original monsters,) of Godzilla to have the edge over Skull Island. The cast is amazing; Samuel L Jackson, Tom Hiddleston, Brie Larson, John Goodman are all at their best, and John C Reilly is even better than the previews showed in his comic relief turn. There's not a ton of originality here; you'll likely find that many of the scenes will have you recalling other films. At their worst, they come off as respectful homages, and at their best, as interesting takes on old films. (Everything from PJs Kong to Predator can be found throughout). Where Godzilla and PJs Kong both require a timesink to appreciate the story, Skull Island comes across much more like Stephen Sommers' Mummy films: After viewing the movie once for the story, you can pop them in even when you're distracted as background noise to entertain between chores and still enjoy it all the same; and there's a place for these kinds of films- some of my favorite types. All this said, there's one knock against it (personally,) and one high point left to mention. If you've seen the previews, you've seen the "main baddies" (monster-wise) the Skullcrawlers. I found the design didn't ring with me that well. They just didn't bring the fear. If you found the design to your liking via the previews, there's no issue. Perhaps they'll grow on me, but they just seemed "meh". On the high note of the Special Effects department, a tip of the hat to the EFX crew- Kong spends a ton of time in and around water, and the varying shots of Kong getting wet, water pouring off him, etc must have been a nightmare to pull off, yet the crew makes every shot involving Kong and water impressive. Skull Island is a fun ride to take, and one that appropriately sets the stage for the upcoming battle with Godzilla.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      GREAT Movie, Even Better with 4K & Dolby Atmos

      Posted
      Panther6834
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      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      I already owned this movie on standard Blu-Ray,. and it's an excellent movie. However, if you want a review of the movie, itself, read other reviews (especially those found on the internet, not the Best Buy site). This is purely about the 4K Ultra HD version. Prior to purchasing the 4K version, I was running a 7.1-channel system, with side & rear surround speakers. I recently upgraded my system to utilize the Dolby Atmos feature of my receiver, and it has made an INCREDIBLE difference. Just so you know, I am playing the movies on a Sony UBP‑X800, and the audio (and video switching) is handled by a Sony STR-DN1080. I disconnected the rear surround speakers, rerouted the wires, and used them for the Dolby Atmos speakers. Within the receiver’s setup utility, I activated Sony's "PhantomSound", which, through some digital trickery I haven't bothered attempting to understand (yet, as I plan to research this), it uses the side surround speakers to "trick" you into believing you also have the rear surround speakers still attached. In other words, while I'm actually running a 5.1.2-channel configuration, your ears WILL believe (if your system is properly calibrated) you are listening to the movie’s audio through a 7.1.2-channel system (front, center, Dolby Atmos, side surround, rear surround, & subwoofer). I’ve already watched two movies, and it’s almost identical to watching a movie in a movie theater, as you are COMPLETELY surrounded by audio.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

      Mega sized monster action!

      Posted
      Mapster
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      The film opens with John C. Reilly's character as a young WWII fighter pilot. His fight with a Japenese fighter pilot has devolved to hand-to-hand after both their planes crash on a mysterious island. The two are engaged in a fight to the death, which is interrupted by the titular character. It is later established that the two became friends as they learned to survive on the island over the course of many years. It's a backstory evocative of Enemy Mine, which was a movie that centered around this very premise. It's a premise I would have loved to have seen as the main plot in this movie. The main plot is derivative, but effectively strings together all of the action centerpieces. The characters are established well enough, but few have much to do outside of simply being creature fodder. As previously mentioned, John C. Reilly's character is the most interesting and the most appealing. The visual effects are fantastic with 100% hand animated creatures by Industrial Light & Magic. No motion capture to be had here, which makes for deliciously over the top animation reminiscent of Ray Harryhausen's work. The score is serviceable with interesting theme ideas by Henry Jackman. The cinematography is another highlight with clever and focused camera angles that clearly show massive battles between creatures the size of buildings. This must've been a challenged considering the wide screen scope that was used.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      A great new take on the classic movie monster icon

      Posted
      SeaSalt
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      I'll have to admit first of all that a lot of my interest in seeing this movie was due to the fact that it's set in the same universe of Legendary's 2014 Godzilla movie (which goes under the title of the MonsterVerse), so I was curious as to what sort of nods to that would appear. But, I was actually surprised at just how much I enjoyed the movie, considering that, while I don't necessarily mind the character of King Kong, I was never one to seek out material related to him (again, lifelong Godzilla fan). And certain elements of this movie seemed to be a response to the criticisms of Legendary's previous film (mostly a more frequent appearance of the title monster). I think the best way to describe this would be to say that it's a Vietnam-era war movie, crossed with a giant monster movie. It's got a little bit of everything; lots of action, frequent moments of suspense, and a lot of intrigue that makes you wonder just what's going on in this universe. There's also plenty of nods to older King Kong movies that should get a smile out of fans. And without spoiling anything, I will say to make sure you do not turn off the movie once the credits roll, as the scene afterwards will get you primed for what's to come. If you're a fan of giant monster movies, you'll probably dig this one, too.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 2 out of 5 stars

      Kong bests Sam Jackson and saves Skull Island

      Posted
      Fred
      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      This is the third reboot of the 1933 classic and, I believe it is fair to say, the original continues to retain its title as the best. In this latest reboot, Sam Jackson and his Vietnam era attack helicopter unit are tasked with escorting a group of scientists/researchers (led by John Goodman and John Ortiz) to Skull Island. Despite their apparent level of training and combat experience, Kong manages to knock all of the unit's helicopters out of the air in a couple of minutes. (In the original, a few WW1 vintage airplanes were able to dispatch Kong, but, in this film, Kong was impervious to the firepower of over a dozen highly maneuverable Vietnam era helicopters.) The director/screenwriter(s) also want us to believe that, despite the impacts experienced by the helicopters that were not destroyed in the air, almost all of the personnel on board somehow managed to survive the crashes (at least for awhile). That's a tough couple of improbabilities to accept. While some of the survivors team up with John C. Reilly to escape the island, Sam Jackson seeks the utter destruction of Kong as revenge for the attack on his helicopters and men, only to learn that Kong is not the most dangerous critter on the island. Overall, this is a watchable action film with a good cast and an ok story.

      No, I would not recommend this to a friend



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