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Rating 4.3 out of 5 stars with 699 reviews

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Rating 4.4 out of 5 stars with 32 reviews

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  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Now this is a Pixel phone

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    Posted .

    When I saw the new design and specs for the Google Pixel 6 “P6” I knew I had to give it a try as I’ve always been a big fan of the Pixel phones, going back to the original. Unboxing: The phone comes in a nice retail box “pretty much how all phones are packed now” and inside was the phone, charging cable, USB A to C adapter, sim removal tool and a small information/quick setup pamphlet, that’s it, no charger “that’s ok I have plenty”. Setting up: Setting up is pretty much the same as all other Pixel phones, I installed my Verizon sim first, and then just followed through the initial steps, add your Google account “or create one” and you are off and running. There was a system update right away so you’ll want to make sure you do that before completing. Also, I didn’t try transferring anything from my other phone, I wanted to do everything manually. Design: The Pixel 6 is pretty good sized, it’s bigger than my S21, “not by much, a lot bigger than the P5, but it does weigh a good bit more than either as the S21 being the next largest comes in at 171.6 the Pixel 6 at 208.6g is which is a good bit heavier. I don’t mind thee weight difference as I like the little bit larger screen and it’s more squared in the corners “reminds me of a Sony screen, in a good way”. Colors are nice and vibrant and the 90hz refresh rate is a noticeable improvement over any of the 60hz screens I’ve had/used. The back is all glass this time, and I actually prefer the plastic back of the S21 or the plastic covered metal of the P5, just no worry about those being broken and for me this one went in a case the day I got it. The phone itself feels very substantial and well made, really no flex to it at all and seems more like a solid one pieced unit. The buttons on the side are nice and firm plus they have a definite “click” to them, a little better than the S21s. If you are familiar with Samsung products you’ll have to get used to the power button being on top rather than the bottom and volume buttons “while on the same side are in opposite positioning”. Use: Android 12 is installed on the phone from the box and it’s definitely different than 11 on our current phones. It has the very simple basic Android interface you will be familiar with if you’ve ever used a Pixel phone and much more basic than any of our Samsung phones we currently have. I did set up fingerprint unlock and it works well, plus I’ve installed a screen protector “PET” and did have to turn up the screen sensitivity, otherwise the FP reader works reasonably well especially if you register two sets for one finger. I also have trusted places turned on so the phone stays unlocked while at home and tied to my smart watch. You can adjust the screen layout and grid size, but this time those settings are under “Wall Paper & Style” after a long press on a blank area on any main screen. The 5x5 layout max isn’t to my liking so I installed Nova Launcher. I was initially skeptical that Nova would be ready for Android 12 but to my surprise it integrated perfectly “like it was made for this phone”. With Nova I was able to remove the search bar as that cannot be removed with the Google Launcher. Otherwise that’s all I needed for tweaking and getting things running the way I wanted. I do like the dynamic colors that apply the theme color to some apps, sort of how Windows can be set to do the same. Calling Features: The signal for Verizon here in NW Phoenix isn’t that great at our house, but it’s on par with our TMO phones, “we just don’t get great service “acceptable but could be a lot better”. So I went out to test the difference in two of our worst areas. My S21 with TMO and the Pixel 6 with Verizon, and from what my tests show TMO is faster but the Verizon isn’t far behind and the Verizon signal inside two different grocery stores was better than TMO by a good bit. I accidentally turned on “Direct my Call” and was surprised that there was a live transcription you can read as the conversation carries on. For me that would be extremely useful as I have some hearing issues and if I’m in a noisy environment I can’t make out what anyone says, so this feature itself will be very handy. Performance: I’ve been doing some speed testing between the two phones “P6 vs S21” and the Geek Bench CPU scores were very close the P6 got a 1031 single core score and a 2841 multi-core score, the S21 received a 1017 single core and a 3355 multi-core score, “very close for this new Google designed CPU”. Then I tested them with 3dMarks “Wild Life” test and those came back as 6398 for the P6 and 5810 for the S21. That’s pretty amazing and a good bit faster than the S21 so I’m impressed and the performance of the phone itself seems faster than the S21 during use. Camera: The camera is where this P6 shines “for me that is”, the photos come out better than the S21, and the details it captures when zooming in and comparing photos is pretty impressive “much better in some cases over the S21”, and I don’t even miss the telephoto “so far” that the S21 has over the P6. I also went outside on a clear night, and took a photo straight up using “Night Sight” and was really impressed that it actually caught the stars above without blurring them, “a lot more showed up that I had expected. The front camera is good as front cameras go and I have no complaints how the video looked during a Zoom meeting, it’s actually a lot better than my desktops standalone 1080 camera. We also live close to an AFB and was able to capture a really cool photo of a F35 flying through the clouds overhead. I have a hard time capturing them with my mirrorless camera so I’m very impressed with the performance of the P6. I also took a picture of a flowering bush in our back yard, using the P6 and S21 and they were within a few seconds of each other. I’ve cropped the photos to a spot at 100% and you can easily see there’s more detail captured in the flowers with the P6, the S21s colors sort of run together on the flowers and you can’t make out much detail. I’ve attached a photo so you can judge for yourself. Battery Life: I’ve had no issue with the battery lasting over a day and even at the end of the day with some pretty heavy use I still had over 50% left, the S21 would always be around 35-40%, not a lot but a big enough difference. I usually don’t charge with the power cord and 99% of the time use wireless chargers, I have them all over, but the wireless charging times are decent and using a Belkin high powered wireless charger it tops up the phone way before we get up in the AM. I also have a very heavy duty case on my phone and it has no issue with charging just placement, as you have to make sure it’s placed just right on the charger or it won’t connect. Conclusions: This is the way I wish all Pixel phones were from the beginning, I really like the P6, better than my S21 or P5 that’s for sure. The screen is larger than both “and getting older I need a large screen”. The build quality is impeccable and the phone feels premium in the hand “and not because it has a glass back”, it’s just a very solid feeling phone. I’ve tried out some of the new features and things like “Live Translate” are fun to use and was impressed how it overlays the translated text on what you are looking at with Google Lens and the camera. I’ve owned so many phones I’m embarrassed to count, but this new Pixel 6 is at the top of my list as a favorite. You get a plain Android experience and can tweak it anyway you like. There’s literally 0 bloatware and that leaves more space for all my apps “ones I prefer, not what a manufacture says I have to have”. I could go on for pages with all the new features of Android 12 and what this new Pixel 6 has but I can say if you are a fan of Android phones this is going to be one of the best phones this year and I’m sure you will love owning one.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    High Quality, Next Level AI

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    Posted .

    Let’s start with the basics. The Google Pixel 6 is a 5G phone which has a 6.4” 90Hz display made of Corning Gorilla Glass Victus, a 50mp front facing camera ( with ultra wide lens), a fingerprint scanner located under the screen, and a high capacity long lasting battery. It is Google’s first phone with it’s own in house designed processor (Tensor). In the box you get the phone, a usb-c to usb-c cable and a usb-a to usb-c adapter for transferring data from your old phone. This greatly speeds up the setup process. You also get a sim key and brochures. You do not get a charger included. After the setup is complete you should update to the latest firmware in the System Settings and then go to the Google Play store and update all of your apps. You are not only getting a new phone, you are getting Google’s latest operating system Android 12. It has anew UI which allows you to personalize the phone more easily. Changing the wallpaper theme will be reflected throughout the apps on your phone. This phone is designed to take advantage of all of the AI features built in the Tensor chip, it is very speech capable and takes the Google Assistant to the next level. This is what I call the trifecta of features that separate this phone from the rest. 1)Phone Assist: Google can answer your phone, from non-contact numbers, and ask why they are calling you. You can watch the transcription of their response and then decide if you want to answer your phone. It will also silently decline calls from known robo callers. When you dial a toll free number a chart will appear with the approximate hold times for today and the rest of the week. So you can decide the best day and time to call for the shortest wait time. I called a retailer and the recording said a 10 minute wait, however Google showed a 15 minute wait. Sure enough exactly 15 minutes later the call was answered. So the Google Assistant was more accurate than the retailer. Should you decide to hold the Google Assistant will hold for you. It will notify you with an audible sound when a human voice is detected. I have used this feature for a long time on my Pixel 4 and it has been 100% accurate and has saved me from untold hours of waiting on hold listening to horrible music. 2)Speech, Translation and Transcribing: You can have a conversation or chat with anyone who speaks several of the most common foreign languages. You speak or type in English and it will immediately be translated to the other persons language. They can then respond to you in their native language and it will be translated back to English. You can even put emojis in your chat by using your voice. I live in a multi cultural area where many languages are spoken. This will not only help in every day life, it is a tremendous business tool allowing you to expand your client base. Live transcription is also extremely accurate even when speaking rapidly and can be used with translation. No need for punctuating, Google will do that for you. You can point your camera at a traffic sign or any document in another language and it will instantly translate to English. It can translate webpages and transcribe live caption videos. 3)Camera: Still photos are very clear, colors are accurate and detailed without being overly saturated. .(See above pictures). Night Sight captures beautiful detailed images at night. Skin tones of all shades are very natural. Great results for those of us who like to point and shoot. However, there are enough camera modes and settings to allow you to be as creative as you like. Videos are recorded in 1080p and have optical stabilization which you can adjust to account for the amount of movement. I found to adjustability of the stabilization to be very helpful. There are other new features: Magic eraser let’s you remove unwanted people and objects from your photos. You really have to see this. It is fun to use and can completely change the context of the photo. Whether at a particular location or with a celebrity and other people are around, you can make it appear as if you are the only person there. Motion Mode lets you blur objects in the background, such as moving traffic, while keeping the subject in focus. Face Unblur does exactly that when the subject is moving, such as jumping. Speech enhancement blocks out ambient sounds in noisy environments while recording videos on the selfie camera. All of these tools and enhancements are easy to find and use, either intuitively or by simply bringing up the Pixel Tools and Tips from your settings. You can search anything on your phone by swiping up on the screen. Just start typing what you are looking for and Google immediately starts bringing up results. Then just click on what you want, whether its a contact or and app or a chat. Privacy and security have been enhanced with additional settings that give you complete control over what information is shared with your apps, right down to being able to toggle the camera and mic on and off. Some things to note: The 5G is mid and low band. Though not as fast as millimeter wave, it is much more available and reliable. I am on the T-Mobile network. Walking around my neighborhood I was able to get 215mbps download and 48mbps upload speeds (see picture). This of course will vary depending on your location and your carrier. Connection of data and calls was always reliable. Phone calls were clear, the screen is bright responsive and easy to read outdoors. Battery life is excellent. Over 24 hour periods I was able to average about 6 hours of display time while still having 20% battery remaining. Easily getting me through a day with emails, calls (video and voice), camera use and some You Tube videos. There are however a couple of negatives. First the under the screen fingerprint reader requires you to keep your finger on it longer than you expect. This results in having to repeat the process because you lifted your finger too quickly. However, I did notice that today it seemed to be working quicker without issues. So either I am adapting to the phone, or the phone is adapting to me. The first day the auto brightness made the screen too dark, however that seems to have corrected itself and it now works properly. The volume does not get loud enough to hear anything until it reaches more than 50%. It will eventually get loud enough but that is at 80-100%. I hope this is a software issue that can be fixed with an update. Overall this is an incredible phone at an equally incredible price. It looks and feels the part of a flagship phone. Loaded with features designed to make your life easier, and it succeeds. To call this a phone does not do it justice. It is so much more. Google has stepped out of the ordinary with the new bold design and I love it, Especially in Stormy Black. We have been a Google family having used Pixel 4 phones for the past 2 years. Our house is packed with Google devices and we have become dependent on the google assistant. The Pixel 6 along with all of the added AI features allows us to get more accomplished with less effort. I would highly recommend this phone to everyone.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    The best Android phone for the money

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    Posted .

    ============================ >>>>> Bottom Line Up front: <<<<< ============================ Perhaps the title of my review should include “Arguably” in the front – since the “best” of anything is can be a highly subjective term to add to anything people often feel passionate about. With that being said, as a long-time phone power user that carries around 2 (sometimes 3 phones) for 6-8 hours at a time, there is A LOT the Google Pixel does excellently - right out the box. That means you can just pick the Pixel 6 up out of the box and start using it like “Pro” – within minutes. This is made possible by it’s super friendly Android 12 “Material” OS, super easy to follow “guided walkthrough” style pop-ups, and quality hardware specifications. In short – you’d be hard pressed to find a better phone (with performance/hardware), with an equally as impressive camera suite for the money. Is there room for improvements? – in my opinion yes, and you can read about them in my detailed observations below. ===================================== > Overall Design/Aesthetics and Installation: < ===================================== Style and beauty is one of those things where most people would say “is in the eye of the beholder”. In my eyes, the Pixel 6’s design is nice change of pace from many of the typical Samsung, Huawei, Xiaomi, and Motorola handsets you often see out there. Most phones lately seemed to have held to the “camera” island approach where all the lenses and sensors are off floating in their own little floating area somewhere along the upper back of the device. The Pixel 6 went BSG “Centurion” style here and opted for a single all encompassing black lens and sensor bar that runs the entire width of the upper back of the phone - from left to right. Cool. However, as this is new to me – I worry that having this giant “glass” bar that runs across the entire back is going to be the first thing to smash into a counter top or floor if dropped == a very bad day. This hasn’t happened to me yet, but even with Gorilla “Victus” glass - I feel very nervous about setting it down too hard on rough or very dense surfaces. I really like the “2-tone” styled color themes they have going on, as it makes the phone “pop” with a little extra burst of color to accentuate the boarder if you wanted to go that route. Personally, I would have liked to seem even more variations in colors, or some kind of design studio options to mix and match our create your own style – even if it cost a little more to produce/purchase. From an actual physical button perspective, pretty much everything is where you would expect it to be – i.e. speakers, mic and USB-C port on the bottom, extra mic location at the top, power/volume buttons, SIM card slot on the left, etc. As I currently have a Samsung Note 20 Ultra that I heavily use, I am accustomed to having the volume buttons along the right top edge – with the power button on the bottom – HOWEVER – on the Pixel is inverted with the power button on the top and the volume button lower along the side. Not a big deal, but definitely may require some time retraining of your muscle memory to get it down more smoothly. ================================== > Personal thoughts /Usage observations: < ================================== Now for the nitty gritty – actually using it. I am honestly a big fan of how the Pixel 6 cleanly integrates with so many of the applications and features embedded in the Google ecosystem of products. I have several Google Nest devices from speakers, smart frames, thermostats, and camera’s – throughout my home. And while other phones out there may support Google Assistant/Nest through their OS or apps, there is something extra “snappy” about the speed and precision of using the Pixel 6 to execute my commands and use my devices. This brings me to one of the most delightful discoveries of the Pixel 6 in the time that I have had it – the “voice recognition” has been OUTSTANDING. For many years, I have dabbled with voice to text with my other phones/cars/devices – but they always seemed a little “off” or would regular mess something up in part of the process. The Pixel 6 didn’t seem to suffer any of these issues and blew me away in voice-to-text commands, messages, and commands. The most utilized Google application in my house is Google Photos. My family and I regularly capture and share all of our adventures with the cameras on our phones and share them with each other (and the various Google devices) in Google Photos. The quality of the images/shots, along with the flexibility of the available camera options and modes- make for an amazing experience on the Pixel 6. With so many options, this could also be a minor issue if your un-initiated with more advanced photographic terms/knowledge – but you can rest assured that if you leave it in “auto” you’ll still get excellent photos that are a cut above most other smart phone. My favorite feature is the “Magic Eraser” – where you can “edit” out unwanted background images and things to present a more focused and personalized look in many of your photos. It really is as simple as using a little eraser styled curser and either shading or highlighting objects/things you want removed. That’s it…This makes sharing our photos on our Nests and Smart frames even more enticing as we don’t have to wait to edit them at home, and we can go back and touch some of the photos we deemed “un-sharable” due to background or person interference. Magic Eraser is not a “cure all” mind you – as in most cases – with careful scrutiny you can sort of see that the image was edited/altered – but from a general perspective (under most circumstances) – it works very well. The Pixel 6 sports an under-screen finger print senor that regularly and reliably worked for me. I like the fact you have the little thumb print guide on screen to remind you where to place you finger and I though it was cool that the screen would like up on the sensor area that your finger was on – as it was reading it. I though it was just as fast and reliable as anything else I have used. The Pixel 6’s 6.4 inch OLED screen was a little smaller than what I am normally accustomed to, but for the native 1080p HD resolution – it was spot on in color and performance. The screen has an adaptive 60-90Hz refresh rate depending on the content - that makes animations, games, and movies smoothly while conserving as much battery as possible. In case you drop your phone into a puddle (toilet) – you can rest easy knowing it is IP68 rated for water/dust resistance. If no one had mentioned that the Pixel 6 was rocking the first Google designed “Tensor” chip ever – I wouldn’t have noticed. From my perspective it was just as responsive and performed just as well to every Snapdragon based flagship I have ever owned. Your mileage may vary, but I never felt the phone was “laggy “ or struggling to keep up with the multitude of apps and windows I was working at any given time. The Pixel 6 could have done a little better, but I honestly don’t think there is really anything that I would consider a “deal-breaker” in my opinion. Chiefly among them is the (re) charging speed. The Pixel 6 is able to support up to 30W fast charge - with the appropriate USB-C cable and Charger (that isn’t include in the box mind you). That being said – my Pixel 6 has been charging slower than many of my other phones that I use on a daily basis that are limited to 25W – and those phones larger battery packs – yet somehow manage to get to 100% faster than my Pixel 6. From my rough estimation, it seems to charge just as fast as my other phones to roughly 40% battery - but then drops off significantly in speed/estimated time to reach the full 100%. My only though on this, is that the charging algorithm must ramp/offset the Amps/power to keep the battery healthy and maintain safety protocols – or some other technical reason I am not privy to. Like I previously mentioned, no charger is included in the box, so while I am not happy about that, this seems to be the new “normal” these days. My only concern would be centered on finding the “right” USB-C chargers that meet the power/cable requirements to achieve the “max” speed/power as many current USB-C chargers aren’t quite as “ubiquitous” as they should be – potentially leading people to get slower/underperforming/unofficial chargers from 3rd parties. From a battery life perspective, I generally made it through my daily routine with some power to spare – but regularly skirted with battery in low “teens” by the end of the day. This included topping off with small wireless charging sessions on my 12-watt wireless desktop chargers.... so if you are a “power user” keep that mind. I generally have 5-6 “apps” that are constantly running in the background (like my vehicle app, security system app, Nest services, etc), and I have several email clients and message services running as well. I also use a lot of video-based communication platforms for several hours a day, so I hope this gives you a better reference for the type of battery life you might see yourself. Secondly, I don’t know if it was only my personal experience, but when wireless charging my Pixel 6 – it got surprisingly warm. Warmer than any other phone I had/currently owned and wirelessly charged. It never got so warm that it felt unsafe – but noticeably so that it is worth mentioning. In the event you were holding out for a physical 3.5mm headphone jack – you won’t find one here. As much as I like the comfort of having a legacy port like this, I think phone manufactures have safely oved on. Although the days of the 3.5mm headphone jack are now behind us, there are a ton of wireless options on the market to choose from (if you don’t already have a pair).

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality
    Cons mentioned:
    Fingerprint reader

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Great Phone with Excellent Camera

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    Posted .

    Short: This phone has a beautiful screen, a high-quality camera setup, and is equipped with plenty of on-board memory and a fast chip to keep up with everything you want to do. Battery life is reasonably good, and the call quality is fine. The phone is a strong performer as long as you stick with it to get the setup just right, and it’s undoubtedly easiest for Android users and existing google/Gmail users to get Pixel buzzing right away. To start: This is a flagship phone, but not the “Pro” version of the Pixel, which sports a telephoto lens and optical zoom on the camera and a larger screen/body. So—you can get fancier than this phone. However, it is by far the fanciest phone I’ve ever had, and it’s pretty impressive. The basic setup here is pretty stout. It’s running Android 12 and has 128 gb onboard memory, with the capability to expand through a memory card. Of course, there are also plenty of ways to use cloud storage, with the onboard google suite. The phone runs on a new chip—the Tensor—and it is supposed to have expanded security capabilities built into its operation. This is not something I have a strong understanding of, to be honest, but the idea of it sounds impressive in that it’s supposed to keep sensitive data safer and runs “Trusty OS.” This certainly sounds like at least an attempt to keep your data safer from outside threats. It has some anti-spam and anti-phishing capabilities onboard, that supposedly also don’t share data and keep information on-device. As well, there’s a “binary transparency,” which is supposed to allow those with the technical know-how to figure out if a device has been back-doored. That certainly seems like a cool feature, but it’s something I hope I never have to take it to an expert to try to analyze. So; that said, this actually alleviates some of the reservations I had about using a google phone—what would be they be watching and tracking? That said, I’ve long ago admitted that I like having google photos, using Gmail, and working with the practicality of the google drive. It’s, in fact, become a necessity for me to use some of these features, so a Pixel just makes all of that ecosystem work pretty easily. The phone itself has a beautiful screen and a slim design. On the screen: the settings also enable you to add a smoothing function, which raises the refresh rate to 90 HZ from 60. You can also choose to increase the touch sensitivity, which may be a good idea if you put a screen protector on the phone. Doing so hasn’t caused any real issues for me this way, though the fingerprint sensor is a little less eager with the protector on it. The outside of the phone is fine—not very exciting—except for camera band on the phone’s backside, which is weirdly chunky strip. I’m going to admit I don’t really love that design choice, but to be honest, the phone is super slippery, and I put it in a case almost as soon as I had it in my hand. So, the odd extra stripe of the cameras on the back ceases to be an issue once you take some precautions with it. And, since those lenses are sticking out, if you don’t protect them, they’ll get scratched immediately. That would be a horrible thing to do to a camera setup sporting 50 megapixels and a wide-angle lens. (More about that later.) That said, I think it’s a little odd that phones keep pressing the limits on how thin and light they can be—but that worrying about the fragility of a 500-1000 dollar computer in your pocket means housing it in a chunkier package anyway. Supposedly the back camera has gorilla glass protecting. I don’t really want to chance it. And, with the Pixel’s top-heavy backside, I don’t mind the case. Maybe some people like this design. Great if you do. The onboard looks are sleek. It’s a high-res AmoLED screen, and with Android 12 you can use the “themed” setups, with wallpaper and icons that complement each other. This is kind of neat—as you can coordinate wallpaper colors and icons. There are some really cool “live” wallpaper options too—which you can download if you so choose; “Marvelous Marble” for example gives you real-time live looks at your location from space. That said, I also still like the option to put my dog on the wallpaper instead of fancy live images from space. That said, the fonts, layout, and icons are pleasantly arranged. It is extremely crisp, bright, and well-balanced. Features on the phone include a more advanced google assistant—one super feature is letting the google assistant wait on hold for you. This has already been a nice helper during my everyday activities. As well, there is a storage saver option that helps optimize space and make choices about storage for photos and videos. This perhaps a good option, but arguably it is odd for this phone to have an incredibly powerful camera and video system only for the user to then choose to degrade photos and videos to store them as smaller files. That said, a 50 mp camera makes large files. I’d rather add an SD card and keep the crisp images than save them in lower resolution. Google Photos is a nice backup, but of course there are some resolution/space concerns there too. The phone has an additional interesting feature called “Now Playing.” You can enable the phone, on the lock screen, to listen to your surroundings and detect songs playing nearby. It will then tell you the name of the song. This is kind of cool, but I also dislike the idea of my phone actively listening while it’s in the locked mode. That doesn’t mean it couldn’t be used in isolated moments, or that all users would feel that way. But, I haven’t thoroughly tested whether it actually gets the song right when it’s listening. Basics: Call quality and reception work well. This is going to most likely depend more on your service than anything else. But I’ve had no difficulty with dropped calls or being heard. Battery: Battery life seems very good so far. I don’t use my phone as much as some folks perhaps—during work hours, I’m often not touching my personal phone—but regardless, with the phone charged in the morning, I’ve still got 80% of battery left. It will regularly last more 24-48 hours. You can also choose to prefer battery over optimized performance, depending on your needs at a given time. The phone charges via an included USB C cord, and charges quickly when plugged in directly. Camera: The camera (or cameras, I should say) are fantastic. Images are crisp and clean, whether shot close up at .7 zoom or trying to take in a gorgeous sunset or the images of bright fall leaves. The shutter also can focus quickly and captures subjects prone to motion blur with more ease than other phones. The “motion” setting will also capture a moving subject and allow isolating crisp images. Colors are true and contrast is good. There are a number of settings available as well—night, motion (which is different than the option I mentioned above—this isolates a moving image in a scene), portrait, etc. and in each mode, one can further tweak settings (like lighting, or using pans, or in the night mode even selecting “Astrophotography” for the next time you want that great moonshot). The video settings are also ample, and include some nice options for time lapse and slo-mo. In video, one can also choose Full HD or 4K, as well as 30 or 60 frames/second. There are also some nice after the photo editing features. Probably the ability to remove unwanted elements from photos will be the most utilized feature. Basically this lets one photoshop out an element by just circling it on the screen. For most smaller elements, or in easy backgrounds, this feature works really well. In some photos, shadows or textures are going to make it hard to work perfectly. However, it’s a pretty handy. I’ll say that the camera wants to share things with Instagram, it seems, as soon as a photo is snapped. At least, some Insta icon pops up every time I snap a photo. But I don’t use Instagram or other social media on this phone, so I have no idea how easy it is to share to these platforms. One last key thing for me: this has NFC technology. I have long had a need for an NFC capable phone, and this is the first one I’ve actually gotten. The technology works as it should, and has added a level of convenience to my life in being able to take advantage of an app and NFC tools that are useful for me. While the Pixel is not a cheap phone, it is one of the less expensive options for being able to use this tech reliably. If you need NFC but are tied of paying top-tier prices, this may be a great option for you especially. It was easy to setup because my previous phone was android. From the get-go, the phone basically guided me through transferring my data and contacts from the old phone to the new, despite the fact that the old phone was five years old. So, if you’re an existing android and google user, getting this phone going should be a snap. Paring Bluetooth earbuds worked ok; the issue seemed to be more that the earbuds were being claimed by another device than that the Pixel had any difficult. Once I put the buds back in pairing mode, the phone easily accepted them. There was one negative experience: for some reason, the Gboard permission for speech to text in the messages was turned off. And, the phone kept just giving me an error saying it didn’t have permission to do speech to text. I tried a number of fixes, including messing with the assistant and updating the Gboard, and it took me about a week to figure out how to turn the permission on. Once I did, the speech to text started working as normal.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality
    Cons mentioned:
    Use with apps

    Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    Best. Pixel. Ever.

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    I have been a long time Pixel user (most recently a Pixel 3XL) and an even longer Android user (dating back to the original Verizon Motorola Droid in 2009). So with all of the leaks over the past months and the eventual official announcement for the Pixel 6, I couldn’t help but get pulled into the building excitement. Now, with the phone in hand, let's see if the Pixel 6 and Android 12 live up to the hype. First, let's talk about the physical device itself. The frame is metal and finished in matte black. The front and back are both glass. The front is mostly flat and has a very thin, almost imperceptible, cushion layer between the screen and the frame. At the top, just between the screen and the frame, is an ultra-narrow ear slit and just below that is a cutout for the single front-facing shooter. The back is glossy, has more curve to the edges, lacks the extra cushion layer of the front, and features the distinctive camera bar. The camera bar frame is metal that extends from the main body frame then is filled with more glass covering over the dual cameras and flash. On the bottom, flanking the USB-C port, are 2 downward firing speakers. The right side features the power button and volume rocker while the left side is home to the single nano SIM tray. The overall design is both attractive and functional. The phone fits well in the hand, the power and volume rockers are placed well, and the camera bar keeps the phone from rocking when set down on its back. Construction seems top notch with excellent fit and finish and no noticeable flex in the body. On the downside, the glossy glass on the back makes the phone quite slippery. So best to protect your investment with a good case. Once powered on, you’re greeted by the beautiful 6.4 inch AMOLED display. The 2400x1080 resolution offers super crisp images with no perceptible pixels and the 90Hz refresh rate delivers ultra smooth scrolling and gaming. Colors are rich and vibrant and blacks are deep and dark. The screen offers a good brightness range from dark-but-visible up to significantly bright, even in broad daylight. Also, having just the slightest of bezels, apps fill the front of the phone while not creating unwanted touches just by gripping the sides, as compared to other curved, wrap-around screens that I’ve used. The Pixel 6’s speakers have been satisfactory. Playing games or watching videos, the Pixel employs the ear slit as well as the lower downward firing speakers to give a fuller stereo effect. The setup offers plenty of volume and clarity. Highs are crisp but lows are lacking a bit. Like other phones with this configuration, the lower speakers do tend to get covered by your hand when holding the phone in a landscape orientation and make me miss the dual front-facing speakers of my older 3XL a little. Calls on both the handset and speakerphone have plenty of volume and clarity. The in-display fingerprint reader has worked well for me. Its placed well on the front so my thumb can reach it naturally and its response has been plenty fast. Accuracy has been no different than the rear-mounted reader on my 3XL, with just the periodic miss-then-reread. That said, I do miss having it on the back: It just feels more natural to me. Also, I haven’t yet been able to test it with a screen protector installed as I’m still waiting for delivery. Battery life has been very good. Typical usage on the Pixel 6 for me includes calls, texts, emails, activity tracking, some casual gaming, periodic web research, media playback (Plex for music and misc streaming services for videos), and managing smart home items such as a robot vacuum, video doorbell, smart outlets, and Google Nest security camera. Through all of this, the battery lasts a full day with some left over without need for midday top-ups. Experience has shown that using 5G, both AT&T and Google Fi, is significantly harder on battery life. But this can be mitigated by being on wifi or dropping back to 4G, which can be managed in the settings on an as needed basis. Wired and wireless charging rates are fast, depending on your source. While 30w charging is possible, no charging brick is included with the phone. Wireless charging placement is not finicky, to the point you can actually rest the camera bar on the charger and still successfully charge. Also, the phone allows for battery sharing, which is a nice touch. The cameras are very, very good. The app launches very quickly with a double-tap of the Power button. There are plenty of modes available; the familiar Portrait and Night Sight, and now the new Motion mode. All produce stunning, creative, flagship-level photos with great detail and vivid color. The photo tools have been beefed up to include the much ballyhooed Magic Eraser. In my testing, while the Magic Eraser is interesting, it never seems to be convincing, frequently leaving smears or discolorations. Video now includes digital stabilization, which works very, very well. Covering a few other features: I tested Bluetooth with a new gen 6 smartwatch as well as various headphones and speakers. All worked well and demonstrated good range. NFC for contactless payments has been quick and effective. Casting to an older Chromecast has been fast and reliable (Note: There is currently a legal issue limiting access to volume control from the volume rocker while casting). Video calls using the front camera have been excellent. On the downside, there is no headphone port, no expandable memory, and no option for video out over the USB-C port. Now, let's spend a few moments talking about Android. The phone ships with Android 12 out of the box, which is the most significant visual update to Android in years. Most functionality is where you’re used to finding it, but has been given a fresh look with the new Material You design language. While its all very attractive, things like the quick toggles or volume settings just take up more screen real estate than before. Beyond the appearance, there’s a lot of good here. Boot time is super fast. Voice recognition and transcription has been incredibly accurate. The ability of the Assistant to work conversationally is amazing. The new wallpaper theming and icon theming are nice touches. 3-button navigation is, thankfully, still available (for those of us old fogeys who don’t like gestures). Also, scrolling screenshots work well (in apps that they are compatible with, which doesn’t include Chrome currently). Then there’s frustrations. The loss of the incredibly useful Power menu (Power Off, Restart, GPay, and access to smart appliances) is frustrating. Even if you go through the settings and enable the new Power menu (Settings/System/Gestures/Press and hold power button), it only gives you the power-related options and quick access to declare an emergency. Most, not all, of the other combined functionality is now available in a Home icon on the lock screen. Then there’s Google’s tendency to kill off mature products and forcibly replace them with products that simply don’t work as well. For example, the loss of Google Play Music still stings. But now, with Android 12, we’ve lost access to Android Auto for Phone Screens; a tool me and many others used profusely. Its replaced by the new Google Assistant Driving Mode. Which simply doesn’t work as well. That said, Android and its apps are an ever evolving adventure. Issues such as these will likely be addressed as updates are released. And because its a Pixel, you’ll have access to those updates immediately. All things considered, the Pixel 6 is simply the best Pixel ever made. Its not perfect, but no phone is. If you want a well built phone that produces great pictures, offers easy access to Google’s ecosystem, and delivers immediate updates, this Pixel 6 is a great choice.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    The Best Android Experience!

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    I've been a Samsung Note and galaxy user for about a decade. I've invested a lot in the android ecosystem and it's become an integral part of my personal and professional life. It's been quite some time since I've really immersed myself with a device that offers the purest form of the android operating system. Over the years I've grown extremely accustomed to a manufacturer's overlay on top of vanilla android. In my case, it's been the touchwiz user interface from Samsung. Coming from years of using a different user interface, it took me about 3 days for me to begin using the Google Pixel 6 from muscle memory; as if it was second nature. The experience has been a night and day difference - in a very good way! I've heard that Google's android phones are the purest and best way to experience the android platform. I finally understand why that's the case and it took me actually using the phone daily for me to understand. A big part of the reason this phone has really impressed me is because of the innovation that Google has brought to the android platform with their custom designed tensor chip on these new pixel 6 phones. The "Smart AI" features on this phone are incredible. I've listed some key highlights below of my experience with pixel 6. Design and Construction: --------------------------- The Google pixel 6 is an extremely premium feeling phone. The phone has matted aluminum sides and a glass back (definitely prefer this over the glossy sides on the pixel 6 pro!). The Gorilla Glass 6 on the back feels like it can withstand some abuse. The front of the display has the Gorilla Glass Victus and as someone who constantly keeps their phone in the same pocket as their keys, I can gladly attest to no scratches on the display. Initially I thought that the protruding bar on the rear of the phone that houses the camera sensors would be cumbersome and intrusive. That has turned out to not be the case at all. When gripping the phone normally (either one handed or two handed) never did it get in the way or did my fingers keep hitting it. When laying the phone flat (with no case) there's no wobble despite the protrusion. You'd really have to push down on the top of the phone to experience some wobble. I find the dimensions of the google pixel 6 to be perfect for one handed use. While the pixel pro has some minor upgrades over the standard pixel 6, I feel as though it borders being "too large" for my one handed use. In terms of bezels I was surprised that I didnt miss the curved bezels from my previous note android device. While this phone doesn't have the thinnest bezels, it's still one of the sleekest looking phones on the market. I also love that Google stuck with the small circular camera cut out and didn't go with a distracting notch! The one thing I would change in terms of design would be the placement of the volume rocker. I wish it was either on the left side or that it would have been moved further down on the right side to make it more central. I watch all of my content in landscape mode so having it more centrally located would have been a bit more convenient. Performance/User Experience: --------------------------- This is the most fluid and snappy experience that I've ever used on any phone. Applications instantly open, load, and close. I can leave several apps running in the background while playing a game, listening to music, watching streaming content, downloading large files, etc. Not once during daily use have I noticed even a minor hiccup. To test the phone I left several apps running in the backgroundc and played the very well known genshin impact android game as well as some warhammer and the experience was flawless. I've owned nothing but flagship Android phones this past decade and I'm convinced that the reason why the pixel 6 provides such a buttery smooth experience on android is due to to the combination of google's new tensor chip and the close to stock vanilla Android UI. Even though I knew the tensor chip was not going to outperform the top of the line qualcomm processors on raw numbers alone, I still benchmarked my pixel 6 out of curiosity. It still received pretty impressive numbers on geekbench 5. It received a single-core score of 1032 and a multi-core score of 2744. More than adequate to run all the latest and future applications. Camera: --------------------------- The camera sensors on this phone are a feat of engineering! The 50 megapixel main sensor and 12 megapixel ultrawide sensor takes stunning photos. When in camera mode, you have instant options to alter color and shadow. I've found myself using this feature a lot as it makes photos with dull colors come alive! The slight disappointment here is that we don't get the new coveted 4x telephoto zoom that's featured on the pro model. This means that we don't get any optical zoom and instead we're stuck with Google's "Super Res" 7x digital zoom. I've tested the digital zoom and it's not terrible but it won't compare to an optical lens. Some of my favorite camera features are the "Magic Eraser" and "Night Sight". Both are extremely impressive features. Magic eraser is similar to the magic eraser tool in photoshop. It does a fantastic job of removing people or objects that you don't want in the photo (so long as they're not the main focal points of attraction in the image). The night sight feature is a game changer for taking pictures at night. Please see the two images I have attached. There is very little ambient lighting in the room that the picture was taken in. The same object was taken with the same lighting conditions without flash. It's as if someone turned on the light when taken with the night sight feature! The whole camera ecosystem has been designed with convience in mind too. Google photos makes it incredibly easy to instantly edit, share, and upload all your content. Features: --------------------------- This is the part of the Pixel 6 that extremely impresses me. There's sooo many great features to list so I'll just name a few of my favorites. 5G speeds are ridiculously fast! When connected to 5G, I typically average 250+ Mbps down and 60 + Mbps up (see screenshot). One of my absolute favorite features on the pixel 6 is the automatic ability to screen calls. The amount of robocalls I receive has greatly increased within the last couple of years. If the pixel detects that either a phone call or a text message is from an unknown caller, it'll automatically decline the call without interupting you (it'll never decline anyone in your contact list). You can also set it so that the google assistant automatically answers unknown calls. The assistant politely asks the caller a couple of basic questions to make sure it's not a robocall, a faked number, or a potential scam. The transcript of the brief conversation appears on your phone so you know if it's legit. Display: --------------------------- While the standard Pixel 6 doesn't share the same quad hd resolution (1440p) and pixel density as it's bigger brother, the 1080p HDR capable display on the pixel 6 is still impressive. Also, I'd argue that at this six inch screen size, you're really not missing much with 1440p over 1080p. The 6.4 inch OLED display produces an impressive color accurate picture. It produces some rich reds, lush greens, vibrant purples, all while not over saturating the image. I also love the deep blacks that this display produces! The adaptive 90hz refresh rate makes a world of a difference coming from a 60hz display. Swiping through the UI, switching between apps, browsing through content on a browser, etc has attributed to the smoothest performance I've ever experienced on a phone. The pixel 6 doesn't have the brightest screen but it's certainly more than adequate. With the manual slider you get 500 nits of maximum brightness and about 850+ when set to adaptive. On a sunny day, I found myself having to turn up the brightness slider to at least 80 percent to get good visibility while being outdoors. I do wish it provided closer to 1000 nits of maximum peak brightness for optimum visiblity on these occasional situations but it's a minor gripe. Audio: --------------------------- Without a doubt, the most impressive stereo audio I've heard on any phone. This thing gets loud! The audio is produced by a bottom firing speaker and the earpiece. The listening experience has been decent enough to where I've found myself, on multiple occassions, not bothering to get up to turn on my bluetooth home audio speaker. At full volume, there's no distortion and music sounds crisp. However, as a fan of a wired music listening experience, the one thing I wish was included was a standard headphone jack. Battery Life: --------------------------- In terms of phone use, at the end of a standard work day, I easily still have over 30% battery left. On most days, I've had over 40% without ever charging it once throughout the day. This is thanks to the beefy 4600 mAh battery on the pixel 6. This phone should be able to easily get you through a full workday with a similar workload as I've just described. You also get 50% charge in 30 minutes if you're using a 30 watt charger. Overall, I've been very impressed with the pixel 6, especially at the price segment it comes in at. While the pixel 6 may not officially be considered a flagship phone compared to the pro model, I feel that it still retains enough flagship features to still be considered worthy of the flagship title. For all the flagship features that you get at this competitive price point, this is an easy recommendation!

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Stunning combination of performance and value

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    Summary In the new Pixel 6, Google has somehow managed to combine top of the line smartphone specifications and performance with outstanding build quality and a superb user experience for a remarkably reasonable price. There have been other players in the Android market who have claimed to offer value priced “flagship killers”, and while they have succeeded to a certain degree, this new Pixel completely redefines that value proposition with a device and experience which are almost entirely free of compromises while costing half the price of recent high-end offerings from the market leaders. If you’re looking for one of the best smartphone experiences available today, enjoy Google services, and don’t want to spend $1,000 on a device, you’ve just found your phone. 1. Differentiated Experience A key feature of Pixel phones has always been their “pure” Android experience. With less clutter due to pre-loaded apps and custom skins, the Pixel offers a smooth, clean user experience that’s fast and cohesive. The Pixel 6 debuts Android 12 and the revised “Material You” design theme which provides some great flexibility to customize the look of the interface. Especially impressive is the way the entire phone UI adapts to the colors in your selected wallpaper. Google also offers regular, timely updates. Security updates are offered for 5 years and major operating system upgrades for three years. Many of the other unique features of this device stem from Google’s decision to create their own “Tensor” SOC (system on chip). This design incorporates custom machine learning and AI capabilities alongside standard high performance ARM processor cores. This allows for some impressive real-time capabilities including: a) On-device speech recognition. Most phones send your spoken commands (or voice typing) to the cloud for processing, but the Pixel can understand speech input right on the phone. I tested this by entering airplane mode. The voice recognition, typing, and even live transcription features all still worked just fine. This is this great for privacy and also significantly enhances the speed at which speech is processed. b) Transcribing text from active phone calls in real time. This system also allows you to navigate automated phone system menus by tapping the option you want on the screen. I’ve posted a screen shot of this feature in action with a call to the IRS. The transcription is instantaneous and very accurate. c) Ability to hold on your behalf when calling a customer service number. Yes – just hit “hold for me” and the phone will wait, listening to the hold messages and elevator music and then ping you when your call is being answered. d) Live translation of text or recorded audio, including a two-way “interpreter” mode. The translation models can be downloaded so they work offline. e) Ability to touch up photos with the “magic eraser” feature where the AI can attempt to remove unwanted subjects from a photo after it has been taken. I’ve posted screenshots to show this in action. These features are genuinely useful and, even in this initial release, quite well executed. I’m looking forward to seeing how Google evolves the use of the on-chip AI capabilities over the next few years given this impressive start. 2. Design and construction. Unlike some previous Pixel phones, the Pixel 6 uses premium glass and metal construction for a very high-end feel. The glass is top-of-the-line Gorilla Glass Victus and the metal frame has a matt finish which helps to make the phone easy to grip. The most distinctive design feature is the camera “bump”, which runs horizontally across the upper back portion of the phone. Because it spans the entire width of the device, this phone remains stable when laid down on a flat surface, although the edges do also tend to collect dust. The one other thing worth noting is that for some reason Google has placed the sleep/power key ABOVE the volume rocker on this phone. I’m sure I’d get used to it, but coming from a Galaxy device I found I was constantly pressing the volume key when actually meaning to lock the phone. 3. Display The display covers almost the entire face of the phone (not quite edge to edge) with a small “hole punch” for the front facing camera. Although “only” FHD (1080p), it is very sharp at 440 pixels per inch and, being OLED, offers outstanding colors and contrast. Google offers “natural” and “vivid” color settings, along with an adaptive option which changes based on content. I used the latter and have no complaints. In everyday use, the display is excellent. Grey uniformity can sometimes be a little uneven, but this is not usually noticeable in normal use. High Dynamic Range (HDR) is supported for video services like Netflix, and the content I tried in this mode looked superb with bright highlights and an accurate HDR color palette. Watching video on this device is a joy. The display does also offer an “always on” mode which provides a clock and notifications on the OLED display even when the device is sleeping. This worked well in my testing, although I’m not sure if or how much long-term use might lead to image retention. 4. Performance Google’s “Tensor” custom system on a chip (SOC) provided smooth and efficient performance in all the applications I’ve tested so far, including 3D gaming, video, and apps like Excel. Sometimes I encountered very brief micro stutters in scrolling things like lists of news articles, but there were minor and I’d expect they will improve as the software continues to be optimized. Google has utilized standard ARM processor cores, including the high end X1 design also found in the Snapdragon 888. Most modern smartphone SOCs use a mix of high performance (and high power) and lower performance but more efficient processor cores to get the work done without burning through the battery too quickly. In the Snapdragon 888, Qualcomm opted for a single high power X1 core supported by 3 mid-range cores and 4 low power cores. Google has gone with TWO high power X1 cores (albeit with slightly lower clock speed). In order to save power and die space, they support these with two mid-range cores which are slower and less power hungry than the 3 mid-range cores in the Snapdragon. In theory this should provide higher peak performance, and some benchmarks support this, but actual performance will vary depending on how a particular application was coded. Added to this powerful mix of processor cores is Google’s Tensor Processing Unit (TPU) which handles machine learning and AI functions, including the superb on-device speech recognition, image processing, and video decoding. The bottom line is that these are high end, high power devices with excellent 3D graphics and AI support which should have no trouble with any workload you ask of them. 5. Camera Pixel phones have a well earned reputation for superb cameras, largely due to Google’s expertise in machine learning and image processing – something Google refers to as “computational photography”. The Pixel 6 continues this tradition with a 50 megapixel main camera and a 12 megapixel ultra-wide camera. The 50 MP unit usually bins to 12.5 MP but can also be used for high quality 2X zoom. Beyond 2X, the zoom is done in software and although you can theoretically zoom up to 7X, 3X is probably about as far as you’ll want to go in most situations. There’s also a 8 megapixel front “hole punch” camera behind the display for selfies and video calls. I’ve tried the new cameras in a wide variety of indoor and outdoor situations and as expected they perform very well, providing great images in auto mode almost every time. Low light performance is brilliant, even in spaces which are almost completely dark. Google’s AI chops also allow for some great effects, including live HDR, creative motion blur (see attached sample), de-blurring of faces, and what Google calls “magic eraser”. The latter allows you to highlight objects in any picture and have the software remove them after the image has been taken. The system automatically suggests potential objects for removal, but you can manually draw around any object you like and the system will attempt to remove it for you. Results are mixed depending on the complexity of the scene behind the object, but you can frequently get some great results. Video quality is also good, even in low light, and can be recorded in 1080p or 4K at up to 60 fps. Slow motion is available up to 240 fps and the stabilization features have been outstanding in my testing. 6. Battery life In my testing over several days of different use levels, the performance of the ~4,600 mAh battery has been superb. Despite using the always on display, a full day of use including photos, video recording, and 3 hours of active screen time left the battery at 61% by 11pm. I have no doubt that with moderate use you could stretch to two days on a charge without too much “range anxiety”. A power saving mode is provided for those times when you’re running out of battery before running out of day. Google has also implemented some battery saving tech, including adaptive throttling of seldom-used apps (with the ability for the user to prioritize critical tasks if needed), and a smart charging feature that allows you to charge overnight and aims to reach a full charge at the same time your morning alarm goes off. The device supports fast wired and wireless charging, and you can even place a device that supports wireless charging on the back of the phone and have it charge that device for you – great for charging wireless earbuds while out and about. 7. Conclusion. The Pixel 6 offers fast performance, great battery life, an excellent camera, unique AI features, and outstanding value in a high quality package. Easy to recommend.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality
    Cons mentioned:
    Use with apps

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Best Pixel. Extreme Value. Stock Android = Amazing

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    The Pixel 6 (and 6 Pro) is Google’s latest generation of the Pixel lineup. The Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro offer Google’s first home built processor, Tensor, with Titan M2 security chip for enhanced protection. Both of these chips provide the phone with faster processing and enhanced security over every other Pixel before it. This paired with all new camera sensors and a fairly groundbreaking exterior design prove that Google takes Pixel very seriously. I will be focusing my review on the Pixel 6 as this is the device I have been using but some of these items can be applied to the Pixel 6 Pro as well. Design: The new design for Pixel is a bit of a controversial one. Personally I really like it. The horizontal camera bar houses the new camera hardware as well as provides a differentiating look compared to every other phone out there. The bonus of the camera car is the phone sits very stable on a flat surface! (No wobble) Google continues offering several color options just like the last few generations which is a nice touch. The stormy black unit I received is a great neutral color for those who may not want a colorful device and I assume the white would be similar. Screen: The Pixel 6 features a 6.4-inch 90Hz AMOLED panel with FHD+ resolution stretching 1080 x 2400 pixels. This comes with a 20:9 aspect ratio, 411ppi pixel density, and an 83.4% screen-to-body ratio. The Pixel 6 Pro features a 6.7-inch adaptive 120Hz LTPO AMOLED panel with QHD+ resolution stretching 1440 x 3120 pixels. This comes with a 19.5:9 aspect ratio, 512ppi pixel density, and an 88.8% screen-to-body ratio. Both phones come with Corning Gorilla Glass Victus on the front and support HDR10+ content and always-on display. The biggest difference is the curved display on the Pixel 6 Pro, higher resolution/refresh rate, and Gorilla Glass Victus on the back too instead of Gorilla Glass 6 like the regular Pixel 6. My Pixel 6 has been enjoyable to use however this is the one area I did downgrade vs my last THREE phones believe it or not. I love the upgrade to a 90Hz screen but I do not like the downgrade in resolution vs QHD displays I have used in the past. With this said it wasn’t as big of a drawback as I originally feared. The 6.4” display has great colors, great blacks, and a higher refresh rate which is pleasurable to use. I just wish the PPI was higher as I have had QHD displays on my last three LG phones. One other notable feature is the use of an optical finger print sensor under the front display on both devices. The sensor works ok but it one of the other minor disappointments of the phone. It can be slow to respond or not recognize at all. I would recommend registering your same fingerprints at least two times for a better chance of the phone getting it on the first try. Android 12: The Pixel 6 launches with Android 12 which is the latest version of Android. The Pixel 6 gets, at minimum, 3 years of software updates and 5 years of security updates. As far as I know this is the longest period of support for Android phone makers. This is nice because you know as long as the hardware is solid, Google will be there is support the phone for many years to come so you are not forced to upgrade in just 2-3 years just to have the latest software features. If you would like to find in depth details of this version of Android, I would recommend searching YouTube for a video review highlighting the changes. Overall the UI looks new and fresh. It implements new design features to provide accent colors throughout the interface depending on your background colors. The overall interface isn’t so far removed from other versions of Android it should be easy to adopt for those used to Android. The settings menu has an easy to use key word, search bar to find the specific setting you want to find so you are not digging through menus. Overall, lots of customization abilities, multi-device integration through your Google account (If wanted), and easy to navigate UI. Only gripe so far is I get some occasional accidental back/forward swipes while using some apps. I have changed the sensitivity to be at its lowest setting but it can be easy to accidentally swipe back (Swipe right from edge of screen). Battery Life: I have had outstanding battery life compared to my last device. The Pixel 6 features a 4,614 mAh battery which is larger than all the smaller Pixel’s of the past. I have easily been able to make it through a normal day with plenty of battery to spare. In fact, I have not been able to drain it (through normal usage) below 50% while using Wi-Fi and 4G data. I have gotten between 3-4 hours of screen on time within my battery usage and I have no doubts many more is possible depending on the type of usage. I have seen reports than 5G can impact battery life more significantly but have not been able to verify myself. Speakers: The speakers have good quality especially for a smartphone but are a little on the quiet side. I routinely find myself using the top 30% of the volume range in anything but the quietest of settings. Cameras: The main camera on the Pixel 6 is a new 50MP (f/1.85) sensor that does Pixel binning to create a final 12.5MP image. The Ultra Wide camera is 12MP (f/2.2) sensor. The front camera is an 8MP (f/2.0) sensor. So far I have been very happy with images from all three sensors. The new, main camera sensor combined with Google image processing and computational tools. Android 12 adds Magic Eraser which lets you remove objects/people from an image. It works very well in some scenarios and just ok in others. The fact you can do this from your phone so easily now is impression nonetheless. Other software tools involve removing blur from faces and improvements to skin tones. I have been very happy with image quality and it is heaps better than my prior phone as Google’s software has been optimized to take advantage of the sensors capabilities. My only minor complaints is the Ultra Wide sensor takes good but not great pictures and could be a tad wider overall. The phone’s video shooting abilities have been greatly improved compared to Pixels of the past and it shoots video up to 4K at 60FPS. The main camera features Laser Autofocus and Optical Image Stabilization (OIS). If you are looking for the best camera specs, you’ll want to opt for the Pixel 6 Pro which features the same Main, and Ultra Wide sensors but adds a 48MP f/3.5 telephoto lens with OIS and 4x optical zoom and a better front facing camera with 11.1MP f/2.2 which also shoots 4K 30FPS video instead of 1080p 30FPS on the Pixel 6. Three attached images (Outside of two of phone) are straight out of camera with no editing. Performance: The Pixel 6 and 6 Pro features Google first in house processor named Tensor. This is paired with 8GB of ram on the Pixel 6 and 12GB on the 6 Pro. Google claims the Pixel 6 has 370% higher GPU performance and 80% higher CPU performance compared to the Pixel 5. I came from a phone with the Snapdragon 845, Adreno 630 and 6GB of ram. I have been very pleased with the performance of the Pixel 6 as it has been overall much smoother than my prior phone. The software optimization here obviously helps a bunch compared to the other phone but I think the processor itself has good performance all around. Overall, I haven’t experienced any real performance challenges so far. I don’t game on my phones but the photo editing and multitasking with apps is hassle free for the phone. Verdict: The Pixel 6 has been amazing to use! It is clearly the best phone Google has ever made. The cameras on the Pixel 6 are great along with the software to back them up. The new editing tools bring another level of power to the photos you capture. Tensor, the new processor, seems like promising venture for Google. Performance has been great with no issues and I am happy to see the dedicated support for years to come. It will be interesting to see its Machine Learning capacities as time progresses. Battery life is another strong point in my usage of the phone. I have enjoyed ending the day with more than 50% left on the phone compared to struggling to make a full day with my last device. I would highly recommend upgrading to the Pixel 6 if you have an older Pixel device or just want a stock Android device with good performance. The value Google has offered with this phone is incredible. Do I believe the $300 premium for the Pro is worth it? Maybe. I prefer the flat display on the regular Pixel 6 but I would love the higher resolution display and the Telephoto camera found on the 6 Pro. The Pixel 6 is by far the stronger value of the two however.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality
    Cons mentioned:
    Fingerprint reader

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    A Google Flagship Through & Through

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    Posted .

    PROS + Camera system is genuinely excellent, with frequently stunning final photos + Photo editing suite is amazing, with the magic eraser in particular living up to the magic name + Some of the best voice-to-text I have ever used on a phone + Beautiful, big display + Plenty of battery life to get you through the day + Google’s new tensor chip is a performance winner and the Titan M2TM security chip provides extra security + 90hz high-refresh rate makes everyday usage feel nice and smooth + Translations features can be VERY useful if you have a need for them + While subjective, I love the design and the use of a camera banner/visor, rather than a block + PRICE, in the age of 4 figure flagship phones, the Pixel 6 feels like a bargain CONS - Display fingerprint reader is slow by modern standards and is quite bright - The camera preview often looks noticeably noisier/different than the final processed photo, which can lead to some guessing for final photo quality - Night Sight photos can take a long time to capture - Camera banner makes the phone a bit top heavy, which takes some getting used to - 4K video doesn’t look particularly sharp - Might be a bit large if you have small hands MY OPINION I have owned phones from almost every major brand you can think of, but Google has always impressed me with their ability to make a phone that provides class-leading features that actually matter, at a class-leading price, while making compromises in all the right places. With the Pixel 6, the amount of compromises have shrunk, and the amount of class-leading features have grown. In the age of flagship phones now frequently premiering in the four-figure price bracket, Google has provided a large and beautiful phone with the best mobile photography system I have ever used. Yes, there are areas where the phone falters, but compared to most phones, these cons are getting dangerously close to nitpicks, as the pixel 6 just gets so much right. Read on to learn more, but if you stop here, just know Google has crafted a phone designed to compete with the best of the best, without sacrificing the core of what makes a smartphone such an amazing piece of technology. PERFORMANCE I am not a heavy mobile gamer or developer, so I can’t relate to top-of-the-line chips of today, but for my needs, which mainly consist of everyday multitasking with some light gaming here and there, the phone performs amazingly. Its 90hz refresh rate feels nice and smooth, the battery life easily lasts me a full day of moderate usage at 75% brightness with plenty of charge left in the tank, 5G provides speedy performance if it is available in your area like it is in mine, and the Titan M2TM security chip provides extra security features which are much appreciated. This is a snappy, effective, and all-around great performer. SIZE This is a big phone, there is no way around it, and I personally love it. As flagships tend to get larger and larger, Google has made the jump headfirst by making the Pixel 6 available in one 6.4” size, and it feels it. It’s a bit bulky on top due to the banner camera, and it definitely feels like a hefty phone. Its got weight and size going for it, and so if you have small hands, or are used to smaller phones like I have been, this will take some getting used to. It certainly feels solidly constructed, far more so than many past Pixel phones I have used, but just know it is big and it feels it. CAMERA This is the big one, the one that differentiates the kids from the adults, and is the feature that put Google on the map with their original Pixel phones. I am pleased to say that Google has once again nailed it. The photos, such as the ones I have included here, frequently look nothing short of amazing. You have an excellent Night Sight mode which can generate low light photos that, while less accurate, often pull-out amazing detail. Daytime photos, in good light, are amazing and reproduced very faithfully. Even high-contrast photos, an area of difficulty for many phones, look amazing. This being said, there are a few areas where the Pixel 6 camera system falls short for me. Firstly, the Night Sight mode is slow, and often VERY slow in real low light conditions. I have used this feature on past Pixel phones, and I think this is the slowest its every been, often taking anywhere from 1-2, or upwards of 4-5 seconds to capture a photo. For stationary pictures, this is no problem, you just need to hold still, but for anything with movement, such as a pet or urban environment, you will likely end up with a blurrier final result. I understand all of this time is going into processing the final photo to make it look amazing, but I hope they can speed this up with updates. Secondly, I find that the camera preview, while not bad, frequently looks noisier or softer than the final product after the Pixel processes it. While this can be fun as you often get to see your photo assemble into something amazing, it can also mean your photos sometimes feel like guesswork, with the final result looking noticeably different to what you expected. Neither of these are anywhere near deal-breakers, but points worth mentioning for serious photographers. Thankfully, the photo editing suite is amazing, with the magic eraser feature in particular being really cool. Essentially, this allows you to photoshop out individuals or objects in your photo by simply highlighting them. Its fast and stupidly effective. Yes, you can easily trip it up by trying to remove an object too large or connected to other objects, but even then it still turns out largely great, and without looking for it, you’d be hard-pressed to notice. Finally, the 4K video performance is just okay, with it looking perfectly fine, but not nearly as sharp or detailed as you’d expect from 4K capture. On a phone screen it looks great, but blown up on a TV or larger screen, and you can pretty easily tell it was captured on a phone. SOFTWARE & THE BEST OF THE REST The final major point to talk about here is the software side of things, which once again is a killer feature among Google phones. While there is far too much to list here, a couple of the highlights for me have been the integration of Google Assistant, which can not only control all of your connected devices, but can also do things like serve as an interpreter with the live translate mode, which is amazing. While we are on the subject of live translation, you can also use Google Lens to translate text in photos, as well as messages and media you receive. It is really effective and really cool to have this much translation power in your pocket. On another note, the voice-to-text of the phone is amazing, to the point where I find it almost flawless when creating texts with my voice, you barely need to slow down when speaking for it to get everything you say clearly. Finally, the Android software integrates amazingly with the phone. The UI can adapt to the color of your wallpaper if you’d like, and the various shortcut gestures work great with the phone’s size. One area I don’t really care for here is the fingerprint reader under the display, which is both noticeably slower than Google’s own previous fingerprint readers on the back of the phones, as well as less accurate at detecting my fingerprint overall. It still works most of the time, but when compared directly with my previous Pixel phone, it feels like a step back. Also, another minor complaint here is that the fingerprint reader is very bright, which I suppose is to allow the device to read your fingerprint accurately, but can be quite jarring when using it in the dark. All-in-all however, the software on display here, like the camera system, is great and frequently the best-of-the-best in the smartphone space. Google has really built a tight Android ecosystem and has provided a phone which takes advantage of it in all of the best ways. The amount of utility and customizability here is frankly amazing.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality
    Cons mentioned:
    Fingerprint reader

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Great Hardware and Features, 5 Years of Updates!

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    Posted .

    Google combines excellent hardware, software, and features at a remarkably reasonable price making the Pixel 6 a standout value smartphone. Setting up the phone couldn’t be more seamless. If you’ve used Google pixel phones before, then you know that all you have to do is connect your old phone to the Google Pixel, and it will transfer all of your apps and information over to the Pixel. After updating the android software to the latest version, you are ready to begin enjoying the phone. And what a joy it is to use. The exterior of the phone is all glass except for the aluminum edges. The portion that contains the rear camera has a raised rectangular glass bump out. It might annoy some users, but I find that the raised bump out allows my index finger to rest on the bottom ledge of the bump out to provide stability to the phone when holding it. The glass exterior makes the phone difficult to hold because it is so slippery, but that is easily remedied once a cover is placed over it. The Google Pixel 6 has a 6.4” Corning Gorilla Glass Victus screen and a 20:9 aspect ratio. It has a FHD+ (1080 x 2400) OLED screen at 411 ppi. I found it difficult to use only with one hand, but then again, my hands are roughly medium size. So, those with larger hands will not have any issue with one hand use. The fingerprint sensor is integrated with the screen. I registered my thumbs and index fingers. The sensor requires a firm press on the screen for it to recognize my fingerprint to unlock the phone. Often times, the sensor could not recognize my finger print, and I had to resort to entering my PIN to unlock the phone. Google developed its own Tensor chip for the Pixel 6, a powerhouse under the hood that makes the whole user experience more fluid, the Assistant smarter, the camera more powerful, and the Android system more secure. Apps open with no hesitation, swiping is smooth and responsive, and the user interface is improved. Google developed customizable color themes that allow personalization of icons and widgets for the user interface, calling it Material You. It’s pretty, it works well, and gives the phone that personal touch. The Google Assistant is even more powerful with the latest Android 12 iteration and the hardware in the Pixel 6. There are too many features to go over in this review. Here are some of the main ones. Speech recognition is improved. Dictation for voice typing is now more natural, with the ability to recognize when punctuation is needed and when a sentence ends and a new one begins. The Pixel 6 also introduces the Live Translate feature that will translate messages into a different language as you type; it will translate incoming messages; it will translate live captions. The pixel 6 retains the ability to translate text with Google Lens. It is very useful when traveling to a different country and needing to read text such as street signs, restaurant menus, etc. Finally, the Assistant will translate for you when you tell it to “Be My Interpreter.” I had fun using the Assistant as an interpreter because my Korean mother-in-law and I can communicate with each other since she doesn’t speak any English and I don’t speak Korean. Such a practical tool! The Pixel 6 also offers Calling Assistance. For toll free numbers, it will provide an estimate for the current and projected wait times for the rest of the week. Also, when making calls, the Google Assistant will transcribe the automated menu options in real time and display them on the screen. Finally, with the Hold For Me feature, the Google Assistant will wait on the line for you and notify you when the hold is over. Again, this only works for toll free business calls. The camera is also very good on the Google Pixel 6. The Pixel 6 sports two rear cameras, a 50 MP wide angle camera and a 12 MP ultrawide camera. The front camera is an 8MP shooter. The camera allows greater photo editing capabilities with the Magic Eraser function. You can now delete unwanted things from photos such as distracting background objects. It’s fun to use and works most of the time, but it is no substitute for real photo editing software. For simple backgrounds such as blue skies, the Magic Eraser works well. However, for photos with a busy background, the Magic Eraser has a more difficult time eliminating the unwanted objects. The camera can also capture motion blur with the Action Pan feature, and also allows you to create Long exposure shots such as the gorgeous light trails you see on photos without needing to use a tripod. The Google Pixel 6 retains the Night Sight feature found on the pixel phone lineup that enables the ability to take natural looking photos in dark environments without any flash. It works amazingly well. The camera also features Portrait, Panorama, and Photo Sphere modes. Google does an excellent job with computational photography, which uses its intelligent software to capture a series of images to blend together with a wide dynamic range to produce a single photo. Pictures, both in daylight and low light, taken using the Pixel 6 are clear, vibrant, vivid, and detailed. Video on the Pixel 6 is also excellent. The rear camera records in 4K (30fps and 60fps) and 1080p (30fps and 60fps). The front camera records in 1080p (30fps and 60fps). You can also get creative with making time lapse and slow motion video. The internal stereo speakers sound as tinny as any other smartphone. And don’t kid yourself, there is zero stereo separation. No surprise here. Battery life will vary depending on how you use it. I got around 6-7 hours of moderate use from web browsing, emails, picture taking, video streaming, and music before needing to recharge. Google now offers an impressive 5 years of updates and security patches, a marked improvement when it used to only offer 3 years of updates. In summary, Google crafted a feature rich, practical smartphone at a price that is hard to beat. It is an amazing phone, and I haven’t been as excited about a phone as I am about the Pixel 6. The user experience is quite phenomenal, and combined with the latest Android 12 features, Live Translation, and a splendid camera producing beautiful photos, the Pixel 6 is really all I need in a phone without needing to spend more than $600. And with an insane 5 years of Android updates, the phone is guaranteed to have 5 years of future proofing. No other manufacturer can match this. This 6th iteration from Google is the one worth buying! What’s in the Box -Google Pixel 6 -Usb-c to Usb-c cable -Usb-c to usb-a adapter -Sim card ejection tool -Warranty and regulatory booklet

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality
    Cons mentioned:
    Use with apps

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    great upgrade for me

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    Posted .

    Coming from a 3 year old Stylo 5 this is a great improvement in camera, storage, security and processor. First, the design. When unboxing I noticed it was quite a bit heavier than my old phone but smaller in size even though the screen is bigger. That's because the screen is the size of the phone, there is no edge around the screen taking up space. The sides of the phone are really smooth, almost to smooth. Before I got a case for it I felt as though it could easily slip right out of my hand. With the case though it adds a little more bulk and grip to make it feel secure in my hand. Next, performance. The Google Tensor processor works great. The ease of switching between apps is so easy. Just swipe up and hold to find all your apps that are open. Swipe left or right and you and can scroll super fast to find the app you want. Pages load incredibly fast too. Move your favorite apps to the home screen and with one tap your apps loads in about 1 second. Very quick!! Setting up your home screen and unlocking features is a breeze too. Swipe up to find all your apps, long press an app and move it right to your home screen. If you want to group your apps just drop like apps on top of each other and it will create a folder. Pixel 6 comes preloaded with many wallpaper and screen saver colors and patterns or you can upload your own photos as a backdrop to your home screen,(see pics). There are several ways you can set up your Pixel to unlock. First a pin is needed but then you can add a finger(s)print to unlock, or smart lock. In smart lock you can set your phone to stay unlocked when it's on you or in a safe place like work or home. The finger print reader is on the front screen so it's a little different if you are used to a reader on the back. But I suggest programming both thumbs into the reader because when holding the phone in your palm your thumbs will be right where the reader is. Now Photos. When I first saw the camera bar on the back I didn't like it. It sticks out so far you would think the phone would wobble when lying flat, but it doesn't. It sits pretty flat unless you push on the top of the phone then the bottom raises up a bit. But after some use I actually like the raised camera bar. My index finger rests against it to feel even more secure when holding the phone. The 50mp camera is awesome though. Maybe because I am coming from a 13mp camera but I never thought I could take pictures and video like this. (see pics) I have tried all the options on the camera and most work great. You can get an awesome 360 degree panorama shot or use Photo Sphere which takes several pictures and stitches them to together to make 1 beautiful panoramic picture. The Night Sight mode adds a lot of light to a dark scene. It actually almost adds to much light making dark pictures almost look like daylight. The one mode I can't get to really work is the motion mode. Supposedly you can take pictures of moving things and kind of get a blur or tracer effect. I tried it on my dog running with no effect. Maybe you need to try it on cars moving fast or birds flying by. That's something I need to experiment a little more with. Video quality comes out great. There is also fun modes to use in video capturing like slow motion and time lapse. Google Lens is another mode that's fun to play around with. Just take a picture of something and Google Lens will search the Google database and tell you what the object is. Try it on trees, birds or insects to find exactly what they are and called. The absolute coolest thing about the photo options is Magic Eraser. Someone photo bombs a picture your taking, just go to Magic Eraser and take the bomber right out of your picture. (see pics) Battery life so far has been so-so. I do delivery gig work and have my companies app and google maps constantly working and the battery drains pretty fast. After 3 hours of work I am usually down to 50% and need to keep it plugged in to not lose any more life while finishing my shift. The Pixel is said to have an adaptive battery to learn your app usage and save power by limiting power to apps you're not using. So far, after a week, I haven't noticed battery power usage slowing down but I will keep trying. Also when I have my car charger plugged in the phone gets very warm. Not to hot to touch but you can definitely feel the warmth when charging. Overall the Pixel 6 is a great improvement if you have an older phone. The Pixel tips on the settings page will walk you through all the neat features of the phone. If you are coming from a higher end Android phone this may be just a lateral move for you.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Price
    Cons mentioned:
    Fingerprint reader

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    A fantastic phone for almost everyone

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    Posted .

    Let’s get this out of the way: the Google Pixel 6 is a great phone from Google. There’s really not a whole lot to nitpick with and makes a compelling case for anyone looking to switch from Apple’s iPhone over to Android. It seems Google has taken the Apple approach with its latest flagship, as the unboxing process is simple and easy. There’s a USB-C dongle (to help transfer data from other phones, which is fantastic; more on that later), and USB-C cable for charging, a SIM card tool, and the phone itself. The overall design of the Pixel 6 is solid. There’s nothing, to me, that sticks out to “wow” you but that’s perfectly fine with me, at the same time. The screen is large, and the little cut-out for the front-facing camera is really nice compared to the iPhone’s “notch”. The USB-B to USB-C cable is a really nice addition. For me, I was planning to use my Pixel 6 as a true work phone; my wife and I own a business and have been using our Apple iPhones exclusively to do so. So. when it came time to power on and set up the Pixel 6, that cable came in handy. Google has built-in a neat transfer software, and it worked flawlessly taking our data from both iPhones onto the Pixel 6. The only real hiccup is that the Pixel 6 can’t transfer data that’s held in iCloud, but that makes sense since Google can’t access that from the phone specifically. Once set up, you’re pretty much ready to go. One of my favorite Google features is that when you search the Google bar for anything, Google will populate results from the Play Store as well, meaning you can simply search without opening the Play Store and still install apps. Apps installed will automatically pop up in new home screen tabs. Speaking of, swiping left will bring up the Google screen which gathers your data to populate news and articles based on your past interests. It’s similar to Google Chrome’s way of doing it and is a feature I like (more so than Apple News, for what it’s worth). Of course, everything is snappy out of the box, especially new technology, so the true test will be longevity, especially since the phone features Google’s new CPU chip. The chip also promises better battery life, and is very responsive to the phone’s 90hz screen. Unfortunately, this screen rate is locked (unlike the Pixel 6 Pro’s which is variable), but this should also produce standard battery life across the board. In my time with it, I’ve gotten a solid two full days of use out of it. That’s with no specific settings changed to gain better battery life. The 5G connectivity is nice, but that’s not a true surprise to anyone. The camera is also great, as is to be expected with the Pixel line, which has always been a strong suit of Google’s. There are a few neat features that people will like, and nighttime performance is very very good. Another neat, not super advertised feature is the wireless charger that sits on the back panel of the phone. This is great because it will charge specific devices Thus, the Pixel 6 is a wireless charger in a pinch which is fantastic. Speaking of new features, the fingerprint sensor is a welcome sight. We all know that facial recognition is great and fast, but hard to do when on the go in the current state of the world. Thus, the front screen fingerprint sensor really helps when you’re in a hurry and just want to use your phone. There are really only a couple of cons worth noting. First off, if you don’t use a case (which, most likely won’t be the case, but wanted to mention this), the fingerprint smudges can be fairly annoying. Also, the side buttons (volume, and screen lock), on my model seem a little shaky in build. There’s just a little too much give than I’d prefer to see in a $600 device. Lastly, while I really like and prefer the fingerprint sensor built into the front screen itself (especially when out and about), there have been times where its usefulness suffers, not recognizing my fingers in different positions. All this said, I think the Pixel 6 Pro is better suited to my personal tastes, but for most people, the Pixel 6 should be enough phone for most. I think this is a fantastic option, especially with its attractive $599.99 price. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed getting one for yourself.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality
    Cons mentioned:
    Fingerprint reader

    Rated 3 out of 5 stars

    They tried, but really missed on a few places

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    Posted .

    The Google Pixel 6 is an interesting phone. On the one hand, you have a phone coming from the de facto standard of Android phones (Google), providing tried and true Google support, the excellent camera we have come to expect, and a price point that is impossible to beat. On the other hand, when using the phone you can tell that there are many things that Google skimped on so as to meet the price point to try to steal market share from Samsung, OnePlus, LG and Motorola, et al. Even with those shortcomings, people seem to be willing to overlook them, which you can see with the backlog of stock; you can’t find this phone anywhere because the demand was through the roof (end of Oct 2021). I’m sure these are all people who have been waiting to upgrade their slowly dying phones have no desire to pay the premium for Samsung et. Al. I personally have just been waiting ever since the Pixel was announced to upgrade to it. I was actually ready to pull the trigger last year with the Pixel 5, but unexpectedly Google decided to discontinue the phone in favor of the 6, which of course benefited me. I think the path that Google decided to go with was offering a phone at the RIGHT price point for hardware specifications that are great but not excellent, while offering the user some amazing proprietary software improvements. While this works in the short term, eventually (and quickly) other manufacturers will match those software improvements making the Pixel’s features not so unique. Of course that will take time, but for now, it is the only player in town offering, for example, built-in photo-bomb protection with the camera allowing you to remove elements from a picture (with varying success). Google’s new Tensor processor is really good, but when you compare it to the likes of Qualcomm, it doesn’t match (in terms of gaming performance, for those who care). The speakers are cheap and can’t compare with the iPhone 13 or heck, even my old OnePlus 6! The 5G modem is older; it is the same that is used in the Samsung Galaxy S20, while the S21 and iPhone 13 have newer models (which are probably more energy efficient). Google Fi is very easy to set up on the phone. I created an account, selected a plan, received the SIM in the mail, put the SIM in and setup my plan using the Fi app. Phone calls sound very clear and work great. I don’t think you necessarily need Google Fi to enjoy everything in this phone, but it exists as an option. I’ve been using Fi now for a few days, it is just another phone carrier in my opinion. Nothing special besides the fact that you can use your Google Opinion money to pay for the service. Yes! What really kills this phone, though, is the requirement to charge by USB C-to-C cable. You cannot charge this phone by a USB A-to-C cable, at all. I left it plugged in all night via USB A-to-C and it didn’t charge. As of this writing, the only USB C port I have is on my laptop. It is quite ridiculous that I have to use my computer to charge. I now have to go out and buy a USB C power brick just to charge the thing. Jeez. “Oh oh, but you need USB C-to-C to do quick charge!”. Why can’t I charge using slow charge? Come on now. Do I recommend this phone? I’m going to have to go with a “no”, sadly. The cons just outweigh the pros, namely the trash fingerprint reader, the underwhelming battery, the lack of a power brick which really stings because of the inability to use your old USB A power bricks, ability to only charge by USB C-to-C cable, the extreme weight compared to the likes of iPhone among others, the older 5G modem, and just the countless efforts to try to make Android OS a clone of iOS. If I wanted an iPhone I would buy an iPhone. Pros: Unbeatable price. Paying $600 for a 5G phone with a stellar camera, top of the line processor and many other premium features is not just crazy, it is absolutely unheard of, and it will be the main reason why people buy this phone. Even the “Pro” version is a very affordable $900. The OnePlus 9 Pro retailed at $1100, Samsung is at $1100-1200, etc. The competition knows this an immediately dropped their prices to match when it was released. Beautiful screen. The 6 comes with a 90 hz AMOLED screen while the 6 Pro is 120 hz. It is beautiful and smooth. It has a finger print sensor, which is nice because many phones are dropping this feature. It is nice to have, but more on this in the cons ☹. Excellent camera. I mean we all expect Pixel phones to have an amazing camera, but this one is amazing. And what’s even more amazing is that you aren’t losing much by going with the non-pro version. The only thing lost is the telephoto camera, but I can count on my hands the number of times I actually have zoomed in (digitally) with camera phone pictures. The built-in software is amazing too, letting you wash out photo-bombers and doing an amazing motion blurring effect. Wifi 6E support. It would appear that only two phones currently have Wifi 6E support, the Pixel 6 and the OnePlus 9. Some really nice proprietary software features. The camera features, as mentioned above, audio transcription is improved, gestures, so many things that change the Android experience. Perhaps most people won’t use most of those features, but they are there. Unfortunately, these features won’t be so unique as more flagship phones add them. Cons: Heavy! The phone is much heavier that any other phone I’ve used previously. It is a beast. Much heavier than the iPhone 13. Battery life. The battery is much larger than my previous phone, but the battery life is just not up to par with the iPhone 13 among others. Keep in mind, I do not do gaming or a lot of video, I just do regular phone stuff. My iPhone 13 can go almost 3 days without needing to charge. The Pixel 6 can’t make it past 2. People on the internet are attributing this possibly to the outdated 5G modem that the Pixel 6/6 Pro uses, it is the same one as in the Galaxy S20 (a 2020 model!). Charging by USB C only. This is really stupid. I can’t use any of my older USB A power bricks because they are USB A. I have to buy all new power bricks that offer USB C so that I can charge the darn phone. Everyone on the internet is all “oh well everything is moving to USB C, and you can’t quick charge without USB C.” Who said anything about quick charge? Quick charging makes the battery die faster, and I prefer slow charge. Why can’t I just charge slowly with a USB A power brick. So so so dumb. The finger print sensor is slow and very inaccurate. I find it impossible to get my finger print to register sadly. Slower 5G performance. Thanks to the older 5G modem, 5G performance is not up to par with recent 2021 phones, like my iPhone 13. The camera is a big protrusion from the phone. I definitely suggest a case for the phone. It certainly balances better than the iPhone 12/13, but all these phones getting a huge protrusion is just concerning. Gone are the days of a flat, flush phone. Google is following Apple’s lead and has removed the wall charger from the box. All you get now is the phone, a USB C cable, and a USB C-to-A adapter. No headphones, no wall charger. Why is it that everyone has to follow Apple? Why can’t companies just do their own thing? Sigh. Gotta pay $30 something for that wall charger if you want to be able to use the highly touted quick charge features. Not-so-traditional design. When I use this phone I feel like I’m using an HTC or Sony phone, not a Google Pixel. It is very box-ey feeling. The best I can describe this phone is like using the HTC Vivid from 2011. Heavy, boxey. The volume rocker is on the same side as the power button. It is annoying. No expandable storage. The speakers are pretty trash, honestly. I have compared the audio to an iPhone 13 and my old OnePlus 6 and both of them sound richer and more clear (less mono) than the Google Pixel 6. A lot of annoying gestures on by default. Yeah, Google had some good intentions with the gestures, but…I don’t need them. I also would prefer they would not try to match Apple iOS at every turn, jeez. I would like my default power button options, not a voice control, thank you very much. Google is trying to make Android in to iOS in every way possible. The camera app? Same as iOS. The notification to allow app usage of location? Same as iOS. And on and on and on.

    No, I would not recommend this to a friend
  • Features

    Battery Life
    4 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Camera
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Display Quality
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Pros mentioned:
    Features, Photo quality, Price
    Cons mentioned:
    Fingerprint reader

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Just Good All Around

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    |
    Posted .
    Owned for 3 weeks when reviewed.

    This is phone provides flagship specs with higher security at a lesser price, and advanced features that other popular brands don’t not offer. The Google Spam & Call Screen feature that automatically blocks spam calls and detects robocalls. I used to get at least 3 or more unwanted calls per day and now maybe one or two per week that slips by the spam system, (usually newly created phone numbers) on these calls you can screen the call by selecting that option on the call, then read the transcript via text of the call and decide to take it or mark as spam and block this is such a fantastic system in today age of high levels of fraud calls. This advance feature alone merits a 5-star review from me since I now have peace during the day. Another great feature that is not offered by anybody else is Wait Times, Direct My Call and Hold For Me that can tell you the current hold time for a business’s customer service before you even dial, as well as the projected wait times for later in the day or week. The Direct My Call option is for who has ever forgotten the list of choices by the time an automated message is reading off. It presents the options and their associated numbers right on the screen, so that you don’t have to listen to the entire spiel again just because you were distracted for a moment. Hold For Me shows what the automated call is saying via transcript text, and you can place the call on hold (so you don’t hear any wait music) and it detects when a human comes on the line by notifying you. The problems what I experienced was the highly mentioned fingerprint reader being inaccurate & slow, Bluetooth file transfers being slow also and noticed that cellular on 4G would drop out from time to time, but all issues thankfully have been addressed with the latest SD1A.210817.037 update. The phone general performance has been excellent and battery life is good also with my screen brightness at 77%, I get around 50% battery left when I go to bed. Games like Asphalt 9 & Sky: Children of the Light run perfect. Call quality on calls is noticeably better than my prior Samsung Galaxy phone. Photos are good too; this Pixel phone checks all the boxes I expect from a flagship phone with bells and whistles that I can’t live without from this point on.

    Features

    Battery Life
    4 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Camera
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Display Quality
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    A Pixel beyond all other Pixels.

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    Posted .

    The Pixel 6 feels like what Google wanted to create when they first started making their own smartphones. It's a culmination of powerful hardware, a good camera and a nice screen that is tied together by software that is exclusive to the Google Pixel phones. Holding the Pixel 6 is a nice experience it feels well balanced in the hand and the high refresh rate screen was a joy to use as it immediately felt smoother than my older phone. The stereo speakers are nice and loud and with 128GB of storage I wasn't too worried about filling up my phone too fast. The Google Pixel line is known for having good cameras and the Pixel 6 does not disappoint in this regard (as you can see from my picture). There are a plethora of modes and different camera modes to use such as wide angle, 7x zoom, face unblur, magic eraser and motion mode as well as having a Locked Folder setting for your more personal pictures. The video mode is also strong and the audio portion of the videos is a giant leap compared to previous models. In addition to the great camera Google has taken security to another level with their new Titan M2 security coprocessor along with the fingerprint reader and new security settings like SoS mode (that will reach out to your contacts if you're in trouble) all help keep you and your phone secure. One of the software features that I loved was the phone dialer's ability to hold my place in line while I called a customer service 800 number, this feature saved me over 45 minutes of time and frustration especially with these phone lines being overwhelmed during the pandemic I can't say enough good things about this feature! All in all the Pixel 6 is a giant leap for Google and a great step to shakeup the higher end phone market with an affordable feature packed phone.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Features

    Battery Life
    4 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Camera
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Display Quality
    4 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Puts the 'Smart' in 'Smartphone'

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    |
    Posted .

    Went from a Samsung Note 10+ to the Pixel 6 (Kinda Coral) for a few reasons: - Live Translate: it is VASTLY superior to Google Translate. It is not perfect -- but it is able to pick up every word of my in-laws' non-stamdard dialect of Vietnamese. - Smart AI Assistant: Bixby is useless. You can do a lot with this phone's Google Assistant + Tensor Chip (I hope I spelt that correctly). - Camera: The Camera takes sharp pictures and has some neato features. It also has some video editing as well which is useful for myself since social media is my 2nd source of income. - Accurate Speech-To-Text that adapts to your linguistic jargon/way of speaking. I wrote this entire review with this amazing feature that can be used in conjunction with your buds. It isn't a perfect phone -- but it's the perfect Pixel phone and it is the smartest phone I've played with. Doesn't feel like another generic android slap-on UI. It feels like its very own.

    Features

    Battery Life
    4 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Camera
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Display Quality
    4 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Its Magic no its a Pixel

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    Posted .

    I consider myself a tech savvy person. I have a my lights, TVs, cameras, garage, air filters, consoles, laptops, Ipads, tablets etc all connected together. I’ve also had the luxury of owning a lot of different phones (HTC ONE, 10 and u11, Pixel 3, One Plus 7 Pro, Iphone 4,6,8,MAX Xs, Microsoft Surface Duo). Different phones had its pros and cons. I like the openness of the Android OS (HTC/OnePlus) but I felt the camera was always lacking. Iphones have the same layout and easy to use cameras. The Pixel 6 is a phone I was truly exciting to try out. Anyways, Look and feel Personally, I don’t mind the camera bar bump. The two tone color is a nice touch. The back has a glass like feeling that you would get from a $1000 cell phone. I am going to purchase a case for the Pixel ( to protect it when I drop it). So really the look of the case is what your phone would really look like in the end. I am more concern with the performance and usage of the Pixel than the look. One annoying thing is the Google search bar is locked in the bottom of the home screen. YOU CAN NOT REMOVE it. GOOGLE needs to fix this. Setup process Pretty straight forward. Transfer my old data and information from my other device (Android 11). Cable transfer didn’t work for me despite trying 3 times. Just use wireless transfer and worked. The phone needed to download an update to Android 12 took about 30 mins to download and install. Search function I think this is a kind of a cool feature. You have search your phone apps, contacts and settings in the search function. Fingerprint sensor Takes about half a second to a second to recognize my fingerprint and open the phone. Its about the same as my other phones. Nothing special about this. Display smoothness There is a noticeable difference between my old phone and the Pixel 6. I guess the 90hz refresh rate really makes a difference. Its smoother when scrolling and better on the eyes. Assistant voice typing It seems better and smooth when using the voice to text on the Pixel 6. It catches my words better than before. However the Interpreter mode is still lacking. At times, Doesn’t translate the meaning well enough. I think Google needs more help here but it’s a good step forward. Camera System This is what separates the Pixel 6 from all other cell phones (or maybe my expectation bar was set too low). Ive attached pictures I have taken in low light settings. 0.7x, 1x, 2x zoom. I’ve also used the Magic Eraser on a few photo to take a people. You can judge the quality of the magic eraser.. But it think this is one of the best feature of the Pixel 6. I can see how useful this tool will be for me and the family. Even previous picture that are stored in the Google photo can be edit by the Pixel 6. This is a great feature and I can see Google using this technology on their other devices. I have used the Motion / action take pretty nice pictures, Long Exposure, Face Unblur (pretty good, but not perfect), 4x zoom still grainy, Ultrawide selfies (not really ultrawide compared to others ive seen before). Overall I am pretty happy with the Pixel 6. At $599 it’s a great deal for what you get. Battery Life There is a lot of marketing and call out of the Pixel 6 battery life. My experience its not the best or the worst. On average usage of the Pixel I can get by (14 hour) but definitely have to charge it at night or in the morning. Below is the “real” world testing for fast charging. On both test the Pixel 6 got warm in the case but not burning hot. Under 50% full you are looking at 12%-14% battery fill per 10mins of charging. Charging from a 90watt laptop adaptor with USB Type C Pixel started at 15% After 10mins 29% After 20mins 43% After 30mins 57% After 40mins 69% Charging from a 60 watt cell phone quick charge adaptor Pixel started at 5% After 10mins 19% After 20mins 33% After 30mins 47% After 40mins 60% With all the good and the bad of the Pixel the best part is the price. Coming in at $599 I would definitely recommend this to anyone look for a new phone.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Best pixel phone to date!

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    Posted .

    I always get excited when Google announces new Pixel phones and this year was no different. When I saw the two new models of the Pixel 6 I knew right away that I wanted the regular Pixel 6 over the pro model. Now that I've been using the Pixel 6 for a few days, below are my thoughts. Size I think the size of the regular Pixel 6 is perfect. I'm a fan of bigger phones so this fits the bill just right. Its just a hair smaller than the Pixel 4xl and a lot bigger than the Pixel 5 which I felt was too small in hand. I've include pics for size comparison of the Pixel 4xl, Pixel 5, and the Pixel 6. Its a chonky phone though. A bit thicker and heavier than I was expecting so you defiantly notice it when its in your pocket. Still not as heavy as the iphone 13 pro max though. Hardware The phone feels very solid and well built. The volume and power buttons are clicky. The frame is a matte black just like the Pixel 4xl was. The back is glass again. I'm not sure when this back glass fad will end but at least Google makes it look good. The color choices this year are great. You get to choose from three. Stormy Black, Sorta Seafoam, and Kinda Coral. Really cant go wrong with any of them. The front of the phones are the same on all three. This is the first phone with Googles Tensor chip. Googles first mobile processor. I have to say the phone is buttery smooth. Navigating around, opening apps, closing apps and just doing day to day stuff. I've had no issues or lag with anything I've done. In my opinion Tensor performs like any other high end mobile processor. Google included all of the latest wireless standards. This years pixels have wifi 6/6e support, bluetooth 5.2, and mobile 5g! I've been using all of these with the exception of wifi 6e, (don't have a 6e router yet), and all work great. I was getting well over gigabit wifi speeds on wifi 6. Around 90mbps download on 5g, and audio streams with no lag or drops on bluetooth 5.2. Display The display is a 1080p+ 6.4" OLED display and gets bright enough for my needs while looking great. Its a bit more square this year but still slightly rounded in the corners. Bezels are minimal enough. Its got a 90Hz display which is on by default. I find that scrolling is really smooth like previous Pixels. I'm not sure why Google decided to go with a curved display on the pro model but I'm glad they didn't on this regular Pixel. I prefer flat displays. Included in the display is an in screen fingerprint reader. Note that its not instant but takes about half a second to recognize and unlock. Everyone has their opinion of where the fingerprint reader should be side, back, or front. I prefer front or side so I can unlock my phone without having to pick it up every time so I appreciate that they move it to the front. Sound I would say audio from the speakers is just average. The dual speakers in the Pixel 6 sound so much better than last years Pixel 5 but not as good as the Pixel 4xl. Not sure why that is though since the phone is thicker you would think they would have done a better job on the speakers. Haptics The haptics motor is actually really good in this phone. The problem I would like to mention is that the haptics motor is placed at the top of the phone for some weird reason. So when typing you don't feel it as much because your hands are at the bottom of the phone. But even with this placement its still better than most phones I've used. Battery From my experience battery life has been pretty good. I've been charging every other day with regular use. I can go two days on a charge before needing to top it off overnight. You should have no problem going one day under heavy use. Oh and there is no power brick in the box so you will have to either use a existing or buy a new one. If you buy a new one make sure it can do 30 watt charging which is the fastest charging it can do. I'm currently using a 18 watt charger so I cant comment on 30 watt charging speeds. Android One great thing about having a Google Pixel is that you get OS updates day one! No need for waiting for manufactures to make their changes and push it months later. Also you get monthly security updates that sometimes even have little added Pixel software features. This phone comes with the latest version of Android, Android 12. I had been using it for a few weeks, even before I got the Pixel 6. Android 12s Material You theming works really well. At first I didn't think I would like it or use it but I was surprised at how well the colors adapted in everything to my background choices. I've decided to leave it on although you can customize it and even turn it off if you choose to. I feel like Android has matured enough now that they are starting to make it fun to use again. Camera The camera has been updated this year and I can tell! It does a great job of taking photos and video with its 50MP camera. I'm a point and click type of person so I use a phone for most of my photos. I am sad they they didn't include a optical zoom in the regular Pixel 6 though. I really prefer having the optical zoom but I guess you can get the pro model if you really need it. I find for the most part my photos look great. What I found is what you see in the screen before you take the shot is not always what you get. After you take the phone it typically looks better. Google does their computational photo adjustments (instantly) and your photos come out looking even better. Also one of my favorite features night shots still look absolutely hands down spectacular. I love the idea of not having to use flash in low light situations. I like that the camera app is simple to use and not cluttered like some others. Google does a good job here. They make it easy to switch modes and edit photos. There is a new camera app feature called Magic Eraser. It works well in some situations but not all. For example I took a picture of my arm with a cut on it and was able to erase the cut just fine like it never existed. Removing any face imperfections works well too. Removing people or objects seems to depend on the background. From my experience it works better when there is less detail in the background so your experience will vary there. Overall its a really cool feature that lets you touch up on your photos if needed. There is also a new Motion mode that allows you to add a motion blur effect to your phones. Its nice when phone manufactures add these little things into the camera app so you don't need to install another photo editing app to do it. I think these features will get better with time too. Summary In the end I love using this phone and I keep coming back to it. I finally have a phone worthy of getting me to move off my Pixel 4xl. Even with a few minor shortcomings this is in my opinion still the best Pixel phone to date! So close to perfection.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Camera, Features, Photo quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Great upgrade without breaking the bank

    |
    Posted .

    I was lucky to get the Pixel 6 and I could not be happier. I was using a 5 year old Android phone on my Google Fi plan. I didn’t think I needed an upgrade since that old phone was working fine, but I did not realize how much I was missing. Now since I haven't upgraded in the past few years this review is based on what is new to ME and it may not be new to those who have upgraded along the way. I intend to relay my experience with the Pixel 6 from that perspective. I have the stormy black version and it looks sleek. I will not go into the technical details as you can get them elsewhere, but I will point out that one of the specs is that the Pixel 6 is water resistant for 30 minutes to a depth of almost 5 feet. The Pixel 6 came unlocked and my old phone used a SIM card. I come to find out that the Pixel 6 does not require a SIM exchange from the old phone. The transfer of all my data and APPS was easily accomplished by placing the old and new phones close together and have Google Assistant do the rest. It worked flawlessly. The transfer to the new phone was completed in around 15 minutes. I added fingerprint unlock and a few other options that the phone walked me through. Lastly my phone number was transferred to the Pixel 6 and I was all set to go. The phone is running Android 12. The battery came almost fully charged and after all that setup the battery lasted me two additional days before needing to be recharged. This, mind you, is with all the additional use as I explored the phone while using Dark theme which saves battery life and I feel its a much richer look. The phone did not come with a USB wall charger, but what does these days? The screen is clean and crisp and scrolling is super smooth when using the smooth display option which is on by default. There are many display options to choose from. This is the first noticeable improvement over the old phone but more was to be discovered. The “Hey Google” call to the assistant works flawlessly, much better than on my earlier Android phone. The response is loud and clear and it understands my voice a bit better than my old phone. This is not new but I feel it is integrated a bit better. I used the recording function and come to find out there is an automated process whereby the recording can be simultaneously transcribed to text. This is done without having to be online for supported languages. I was able to take the transcript and share it via any shareable method, I chose email. Easy. Imagine what this can do for the hearing impaired and copious note takers. Live translate is a very useful feature. You can point the camera to a sign, lets say at a railway station, and have it immediately translated to English. I have used this to translate a document right off the screen of my PC. This will be helpful translating a menu during foreign travel. There is also an interpreter mode that allows you to translate by just taking turns speaking in your native language and have it translated. It is conversational, both parties just speak. I have done this and it works very well. In my opinion the camera on the Pixel 6 rivals my HD-SLR produced by a well respected company. The most talked about feature is the eraser. This tool will remove a photo-bomber and unwanted items in your photo. In my experience it works great. I will include two pictures in the review to show how it removed people and other artifacts from the beach.This picture was not taken with the Pixel 6 but it was in the camera roll. The eraser automatically suggested removing people from my beach picture and I allowed it to do so automatically. I also manually removed someone on a small water craft and what looked like an anchor rope by just drawing a circle around the element to erase. No longer do I have to use a complicated program to edit my photos. There are many other editing options related to color, filters, cropping and many other tools presented in an easy to use format. I was able to include text on my picture and place it anywhere in the frame. The easy to take panoramic pictures are nice especially for large groups and landscapes. I have also used the BLUR and UN-BLUR features. Remember this is all done easily on the Pixel ! It is all very intuitive. I have also created HDR videos that look outstanding. The phone will create a link you can share with others to view the file, which can become quite large quickly. There are way too many photo options to go into here, but I believe they have included everything you need to up your photo game, as I have done. Video recordings can be in full HD at 1080p or 4K at 30 or 60 FPS. Yes there is a bump on the top rear of the phone that houses the lenses. Its a bit odd but I'm past it now that I have been using the phone for a few days. The Pixel seems to get smarter the more you use it. It suggested features I was not aware of after poking around the various menus. It reminded me to setup Amazon photo backup. Google photo was automatically setup for me earlier. It also suggested a method to allow messaging to also appear on my PC. This links the Pixel to your PC by way of a web page and allows me to receive and send SMS/MMS messages. Now I don’t have to keep reaching for my Pixel while doing PC based work to read incoming messages and reply as needed. This may not be new but its easy implementation makes this an easy to use feature. I use it all the time now. Pixel 6 also suggested that I turn on call screening. There is a video explaining this feature and I have turned it on. I would get a few spam calls a day but so far none have rung through to me since they might be in the Google spam number database. If you are not in my contacts you will be asked to say why you are calling. If there is no answer to that question the call will ring thru but indicate the caller did not speak. If the caller does respond I will see a transcript of what they said. Either way at this point I can then either decline or answer the call.. Sprinkled around the various menus are what seem to be context based help files. I have found them very useful in setting up the various options on the phone, and be aware there are many. I did have to Google one or two help webpages, but just be aware that help is out there and easily found even for such a new product. My experiences have all been positive with the Pixel 6. Maybe it was a good idea not to upgrade for a few years until a game changing product like this became available.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Features

    Battery Life
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Camera
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Display Quality
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Best Android out there

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    |
    Posted .
    Owned for 1 week when reviewed.

    I love it. Great upgrade. I have enjoyed this phone from day one.

    Features

    Battery Life
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Camera
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    Display Quality
    5 out of 5
     
     
     
     
     
    I would recommend this to a friend