42 [DVD] [2013]

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    Overview

    Ratings & Reviews


    Overall Customer Rating:
    99% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (816 out of 829)

    Special Features


    • Stepping into history

    Synopsis


    42
    Brian Helgeland's historical sports drama/biopic 42 relates the historic 1947 baseball season in which Brooklyn Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford) decides to sign the first black Major League player, Jackie Robinson (Chadwick Boseman). Although Robinson faces ugly, vicious racism from other clubs, fans, and on occasion his own teammates, Rickey encourages him to not fight back. By following that advice, Robinson allows his remarkable athletic talent to speak for itself, and soon the first-year player becomes one the most popular players on the team, eventually securing the Rookie of the Year award. Christopher Meloni and Hamish Linklater co-star. ~ Perry Seibert, Rovi

    Cast & Crew


    • Chadwick Boseman
      Chadwick Boseman - Jackie Robinson
    • Harrison Ford
      Harrison Ford - Branch Rickey
    • Nicole Beharie
      Nicole Beharie - Rachel Robinson
    • Christopher Meloni
      Christopher Meloni - Leo Durocher
    • Ryan Merriman
      Ryan Merriman - Dixie Walker



    Customer rating

    4.7
    99%
    would recommend to a friend
    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Go Jackie! Go!!!

      Posted
      ramivic
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      When I was a kid Jackie Robinson and Branch Rickey were history, I read about them in books. But my baseball heroes were Billy Williams and Fergie Jenkins, to me they were always just baseball players, their being black wasn't a factor in either my liking or disliking of them, and "42" brings home the truly heroic effort and forces Jackie Robinson had to overcome. "Sports movies" are best when they're a metaphor for other areas of our lives. "Field of Dreams" isn't really about baseball, "Rocky" isn't really about boxing, and "Hoosiers" really isn't about basketball. What those movies speak to are other forces in our lives that hopefully bring out the best in us, and while "42" isn't metaphorical it speaks directly to our views of race and racism. "42" takes place between 1946 and 1948 when Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford) brought Jackie Robinson (Chadwick Boseman) to the Brooklyn Dodgers and integrated baseball. The plot is as simple as that, the story isn't. Robinson was virtually alone, Martin Luther King Jr was still a high school student, Rosa Parks hadn't yet refused to sit at the back of the bus (although Robinson had and was court-martialed for it in the military), those who believed in him were his wife Rachael (Nicole Beharie) and Rickey. Robinson didn't even have the backing of his teammates who started a petition refusing to play with Robinson, slowly Robinson won over their respect. The way Robinson won over their respect, besides being a great ballplayer was to smile while epithets and threats were hurled at him, to get back up after players on opposing teams purposefully injured him. Robinson is a man with a temper but he knows history is watching and whether the integration of baseball happens or not rests on how he acts, and in public he was a tower of strength and "42" is brave enough to show Robinson's private moment of doubt and wanting to strike back at his attackers. The cast and acting of "42" is superb, Chadwick Boseman resembles Robinson so much the only thing better would have been Robinson playing himself. Boseman exudes Robinson's strength smiling in the face of those who don't want him in baseball while showing the pain that lies just under Robinson's surface. Ford's Branch Rickey is a hero apart from the characters of overt action Ford has played in the past and Ford summon's Rickey's unshakeable faith in the integration of baseball because of his sense of what is right and his religious views make Rickey a pillar against which the waves of racism wash against and try to erode but ultimately fail. It may be to early in the year but this may be a Oscar worthy performance for Ford. Nicole Beharie as Rachel Robinson is Jackie's pillar of strength, it's a clichéd role but it is no way clichéd or rote acting, Beharie conveys the tender support Rachel Robinson did for Jackie and as she still does carrying on his legacy. Christopher Meloni is great as Dodgers manager Leo Durocher and he brings the menace and ultimate authority that Durocher had as a manager, it's a shame history took Durocher out of the game so early in Robinson's story Meloni steals the screen in his scenes. As Durocher's replacement Max Gail plays Burt Shooten, the position and character are place holders in history and the movie, but it's kind of cool to see Max Gail in a film. Today all sports and teams are integrated, all races participate in all sports, we don't even think of it as integration any more, it's just the fact that if you rise to a certain level of achievment you can play professional sports no matter your ethnic background or heritage. There are also reminders for us that "42" isn't dead history, throughout the movie we hear the rejoinder of "this isn't the America I know" echoes of which we've heard in our recent past. "42" even offers a choice, when the Dodgers play in Cincinnati we see a father and son in the stands, the father relating seeing his baseball hero Honus Wagner as a kid, a touching moment that has probably been repeated millions of times in the 100 year plus history of professional baseball. That is why "42" is a special movie that reminds of us a time that wasn't so long ago (well within the confines of a life time) and how we got to where we are, it's a history to remember and not let the forces of ignorance and hate take us backwards.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Tale of real life heroism.

      Posted
      mememe
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      42, written and directed by Brian Helgeland, is based on the real-life story of Jack Roosevelt "Jackie" Robinson, the first African-American baseball player to play in the major leagues. Robinson's story is well known to many, but to anyone who isn't, 42 (Robinson's number when he played for the Brooklyn Dodgers) will serve to acquaint them with the man and his achievements against the backdrop of the times he lived through. The cast is excellent and give outstanding performances, particularly when recreating the feel of the times and the way it felt to watch Robinson play. The story begins in 1945, when Brooklyn Dodgers owner Branch Rickey (a deftly turned performance by Harrison Ford) makes the decision that his team is going to be the first major league baseball team to recruit and field a black player. He takes his time, going over the various prospects with his staff, and finally settles on a short-stop currently playing for a black league team, the Kansas City Monarchs, Jackie Robinson (terrifically played by Chadwick Boseman). The film then follows Robinson's career, starting with his being signed to Rickey's minor-league Montreal Royals for the 1946 season, and then his move up to the big league Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. One of the best things about 42 is that it does show just how racially divided American was in the years following WWII and how openly hostile - and acted upon - the racism was in those days. This is absolutely vital to the film in order to show just how daring - and risky - Rickey's decision was, and how daunting the challenge was for Robinson to was to step up to the plate and face the hostility of not only the crowds but also that of his own teammates as well.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      A baseball flick that masters its genre

      Posted
      CallsignWT
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      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      "42, The Jackie Robinson Story" delivers a solid, moving and ultimately a triumphant performance about one of the most iconic and groundbreaking figures in the history of the sport of baseball. It is a most worthy tribute to not just Jackie Robinson the athlete but to Jackie Robinson, the man. Chadwick Boseman brings Jackie's persona and character to life on the big screen with strength and dignity. Harrison Ford delivers as the risk taking General Manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers Branch Rickey. Alan Tudyk (for all of you Firefly fans) delivers a performance that has to be seen to be believed as the nefarious racist manager of the Philadelphia Phillies, Ben Chapman. "42" is the movie that belongs in the collection of serious movie aficionados regardless of their love, or lack thereof, for the sport.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 1 out of 5 stars

      WRONG FORMAT ADVERTISED

      Posted
      JScott
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      I was EXTREMELY UPSET that the format that was advertised and what was shipped were two different items. The advertised one in print and in image shows the bonus pack of blue ray dvd, dvd, and digital copy. What was mailed to me 2 times was the blue ray dvd only. Customer service was great in assisting me and the Manager at the Tukwila location was great in trying to get to the bottom of it. UNFORTUNATELY I was not able to get this movie in the format I wanted for my husband.

      No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      An important piece of history

      Posted
      Catriona
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      Everyone has heard of Jackie Robinson, but how many know what he really went through to achieve his place as the first African-American professional baseball player in America? Here you will experience it with him. Chadwick Boseman does any amazing job of communicating with the slightest look how Jackie felt about the racism he encountered. One scene where he is badgered by the coach from another team with racial epithets is so painful to watch that you want to turn away but can't--because Jackie didn't. A worthwhile film for anyone interested in baseball, American race relations, and the resilience of the human spirit.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      I was an extra

      Posted
      AuHurricane
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      • My Best Buy® MemberMember

      It was a good movie. I was actually an extra when they shot at on of the oldest baseball stadium in the country still standing. Rockwood Field in Birmingham, Al. I will say you just don't know how long a movie takes until you are in one. That one scene where he is talking about the catcher having a rag arm. That was the scene I was in. I thought hey I am behind home plate and he is stealing home I may get to be in the movie.. Boy was I wrong and the backdrop was blurred out. Over 24 hours logged as an extra and about 10 of those were working on that scene and a few shots leading up to it. All in all it was a good experience and good movie too.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

      Sentimental Biopic TV Movie of the Week

      Posted
      SaulYall
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      Too bad they couldn't just tell the story without fawning over it. Jackie Robinson is as important a baseball story as you'll find. This movie looks upon it with nostalgia and judgement, commenting on scenes instead of just letting the story unfold. Nothing feels authentic. Chadwick Boseman is ok as Robinson. Harrison Ford plays Branch Rickey in broad strokes. Racists get cinematic paybacks, enemies become friends, lessons learned, all in sepia tones with ham handed music to tell us how to feel. If you liked The Natural or The Babe, you might enjoy this sort of approach. I like my baseball movies on the Bull Durham side.

      No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Great movie, and I am not even a baseball fan

      Posted
      WMD3
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      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      My wife bought this movie because it was a great price and she heard it was good. We had it about a month before we even watched it. Then one night after the kids were asleep we started watching it, not expecting to finish it. But, it was so good we just couldn't stop. We tend to watch movies at because our little kids rarely let us focus on a movie and most movies we just don't want to expose them to yet. But other than just a little language from the period, there was nothing that I remember not wanting my boys to witness. I really enjoyed this movie, even if I was tired the next morning. And I would recommend it even if you are not a fan of baseball.

      I would recommend this to a friend



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