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American Sniper: The Chris Kyle Commemorative Edition [2 Discs] [DVD] [2014]

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    American Sniper: The Chris Kyle Commemorative Edition [2 Discs] (DVD)  2014 - Larger Front
    American Sniper: The Chris Kyle Commemorative Edition [2 Discs] (DVD) 2014
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    Overall Customer Rating:
    100% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (4727 out of 4762)

    Synopsis


    American Sniper
    Biopic of Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper), the most-celebrated sniper in American military history. In the aftermath of 9/11, Kyle decides to serve his country by becoming a Navy SEAL. But with each tour of duty, he grows more detached from his wife and children. As the story opens, we meet carefree brothers Chris and Jeff (Keir O'Donnell) as they work the Texas rodeo circuit. They're cowboys through and through, and despite being notably older than the usual enlistee, Chris pays a visit to his local recruitment office and decides to become a Navy SEAL. Later, at the firing range, he draws on his hunting lessons with his stern father to become an expert marksman. A booze-fueled barroom chat with pretty brunette Taya (Sienna Miller) soon leads to wedding bells, and following the terrorist attacks of 9/11, Kyle is deployed to Iraq for his first tour of duty. There, his reputation as a sniper who never misses makes him a legend among his fellow troops, and earns him the moniker "The Devil of Ramadi" from his enemies. With a substantial bounty on his head, Kyle makes it his personal mission to take out a sadistic Iraqi soldier known as "The Butcher," as well as an elusive enemy marksman with a skill to rival his own. The closer he gets to achieving his goals during repeat tours of duty, however, the more fellow soldiers he sees die, and the further he drifts from Taya and their two children back home. It all leads up to a tense rooftop gunfight in a raging sandstorm -- one that convinces the sniper once and for all to make his family his top priority. Unfortunately, all is not well as Kyle struggles to make the transition back to civilian life, but he discovers that helping his fellow veterans is an effective way to do good and make peace with his wartime experiences. ~ Jeremy Wheeler, Rovi

    Cast & Crew


    • Bradley Cooper
      Bradley Cooper - Chris Kyle
    • Luke Grimes
      Luke Grimes - Marc Lee
    • Sienna Miller
      Sienna Miller - Taya
    • Kyle Gallner
      Kyle Gallner - Goat-Winston
    • Ben Reed
      Ben Reed - Wayne Kyle



    Customer rating

    Rating 4.9 out of 5 stars with 4762 reviews

    99%
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    Most relevant reviews

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    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Can a Man Who Kills This Much Still Be Human?

      Posted
      MysteryShopper
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      Chris Kyle is on record as being the most leathal sniper in US Military history, with 160 confirmed kills out of a suspected 255. When word got out that Clint Eastwood would be adapting Kyle's book into a major motion picture, “American Sniper,” there were protests and complaints, as there usually are when such subject matter such as this is turned into a film. Many critics of war have claimed that this man can not possibly be considered a hero. Who can kill so many people, with such ease (and glee, if his logs are to be believed#, be considered anything but evil? Eastwood is old though, and with age usually comes wisdom. He see's clearly how Kyle is a hero. That is why “American Sniper” feels so patriotic in the face of such horrible death that surrounds it. When we first meet Kyle #Bradley Cooper# he is in position, covering his men during his first tour in Iraq. He witnesses a woman hand a boy a grenade and instructs the kid to attact the American soldiers with it. In that moment Kyle is in a situation where no one can truly relate. There is a kid with a weapon, no other soldier can confirm this, and thus the call to kill him is in Kyles hands. At this point who that kid might be, what life he might live, none of it matters. All he sees is someone with a weapon is going to kill his men. So what does he do? He takes the shot. I mean, what else was he going to do? Given the choice between saving a dozen of his fellow soldiers and this kid, he'll easily shoot the kid. This is just one decision though. He has to deal with dozens of situations like this on a daily basis. There are times he's on the ground with the men who covers, and now his life might be in the hands of others as well. This is the life he lives. He is there to save lives. Some of the men he protects #including his own brother# are starting to look at what they are doing, the reasons for them being at war, with distain and doubt. Kyle has no time to think like that. He's got a job to do, and whether these men believe in the war anymore or not, that job is to keep them alive during it. So too, are we now part of the war, as Eastwood pits us tightly in every situation Kyle finds himself in. Most war movies we watch we are witnesses to the grand horror that is on display. Here we are almost always by Kyles side, putting us into the horror itself as if we were there. The film was recently remastered for an IMAX release, which is where I saw it, and the extra size just brought the intimacy of the film that much closer. This is important because the most intense moments do come from the distance, where Kyle is forced to make the kind of decisions we could only imagine making. The movie also takes time to show us his home life with his wife #Sienna Miller), who spends most of the time worried about her husband and begging him to come home. Though many might say the whole point of her character is to be a nagging wife, the reality is that she just can't understand what life is like over in Iraq, and because of that she may be the only dose of reality her husband gets in his life. I'm not sure how much of Kyles story was changed for the movie. Some say he enjoyed killing more than what portrayed in the movie. I don't know what people were expecting him to be portrayed as, but I think Kyles dedication to the war, while certainly motivated in part because of his need to protect his men, shows that there is a huge part of him that does enjoy the killing, and does get a high out of the hunt. At one point he is in a situation where he might need to kill a potentially innocent bystander. In his mind he begs the person to stop what they are doing, but when the person does drop the weapon Kyle breaths a breath of disappointment. We can tell that, deep down, he wanted to kill that person, and was upset because he didn't get to. Yet Eastwood understands that it is the nature of the beast that can cause men to feel this way. So too, does Bradley Cooper, who gives the sort of nuanced performance that can make or break a movie, and thankfully he understands this situation and character in a way that brings the movie so close to home. That Kyle was a natural killer did not make him a bad guy, and both Copper and Eastwood know this. He was a hero, just one who happened to have the most kills on US Military record. Some people might not be able to understand this. I think “American Sniper” is an attempt to bring this reality to the movie going public. Knowing how stubborn people are, I doubt this will take. But if you take away just one thing, take away the final image of Chris Kyle's funeral. Navy Seals have a tradition of honoring men they respect with personal emblems punched onto the caskets. Chris Kyle had more of these emblems on his coffin than any coffin I have ever seen before. If this image doesn't make it clear the difference Chris Kyle made in the lives of the men he was hired to protect, then I can only assume you are as heartless a human being as you claim Chris Kyle is.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Can a Man Who Kills This Much Still Be Human?

      Posted
      MysteryShopper
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      Chris Kyle is on record as being the most leathal sniper in US Military history, with 160 confirmed kills out of a suspected 255. When word got out that Clint Eastwood would be adapting Kyle's book into a major motion picture, “American Sniper,” there were protests and complaints, as there usually are when such subject matter such as this is turned into a film. Many critics of war have claimed that this man can not possibly be considered a hero. Who can kill so many people, with such ease (and glee, if his logs are to be believed#, be considered anything but evil? Eastwood is old though, and with age usually comes wisdom. He see's clearly how Kyle is a hero. That is why “American Sniper” feels so patriotic in the face of such horrible death that surrounds it. When we first meet Kyle #Bradley Cooper# he is in position, covering his men during his first tour in Iraq. He witnesses a woman hand a boy a grenade and instructs the kid to attact the American soldiers with it. In that moment Kyle is in a situation where no one can truly relate. There is a kid with a weapon, no other soldier can confirm this, and thus the call to kill him is in Kyles hands. At this point who that kid might be, what life he might live, none of it matters. All he sees is someone with a weapon is going to kill his men. So what does he do? He takes the shot. I mean, what else was he going to do? Given the choice between saving a dozen of his fellow soldiers and this kid, he'll easily shoot the kid. This is just one decision though. He has to deal with dozens of situations like this on a daily basis. There are times he's on the ground with the men who covers, and now his life might be in the hands of others as well. This is the life he lives. He is there to save lives. Some of the men he protects #including his own brother# are starting to look at what they are doing, the reasons for them being at war, with distain and doubt. Kyle has no time to think like that. He's got a job to do, and whether these men believe in the war anymore or not, that job is to keep them alive during it. So too, are we now part of the war, as Eastwood pits us tightly in every situation Kyle finds himself in. Most war movies we watch we are witnesses to the grand horror that is on display. Here we are almost always by Kyles side, putting us into the horror itself as if we were there. The film was recently remastered for an IMAX release, which is where I saw it, and the extra size just brought the intimacy of the film that much closer. This is important because the most intense moments do come from the distance, where Kyle is forced to make the kind of decisions we could only imagine making. The movie also takes time to show us his home life with his wife #Sienna Miller), who spends most of the time worried about her husband and begging him to come home. Though many might say the whole point of her character is to be a nagging wife, the reality is that she just can't understand what life is like over in Iraq, and because of that she may be the only dose of reality her husband gets in his life. I'm not sure how much of Kyles story was changed for the movie. Some say he enjoyed killing more than what portrayed in the movie. I don't know what people were expecting him to be portrayed as, but I think Kyles dedication to the war, while certainly motivated in part because of his need to protect his men, shows that there is a huge part of him that does enjoy the killing, and does get a high out of the hunt. At one point he is in a situation where he might need to kill a potentially innocent bystander. In his mind he begs the person to stop what they are doing, but when the person does drop the weapon Kyle breaths a breath of disappointment. We can tell that, deep down, he wanted to kill that person, and was upset because he didn't get to. Yet Eastwood understands that it is the nature of the beast that can cause men to feel this way. So too, does Bradley Cooper, who gives the sort of nuanced performance that can make or break a movie, and thankfully he understands this situation and character in a way that brings the movie so close to home. That Kyle was a natural killer did not make him a bad guy, and both Copper and Eastwood know this. He was a hero, just one who happened to have the most kills on US Military record. Some people might not be able to understand this. I think “American Sniper” is an attempt to bring this reality to the movie going public. Knowing how stubborn people are, I doubt this will take. But if you take away just one thing, take away the final image of Chris Kyle's funeral. Navy Seals have a tradition of honoring men they respect with personal emblems punched onto the caskets. Chris Kyle had more of these emblems on his coffin than any coffin I have ever seen before. If this image doesn't make it clear the difference Chris Kyle made in the lives of the men he was hired to protect, then I can only assume you are as heartless a human being as you claim Chris Kyle is. Kevin T. Rodríguez The Movie Wizard.com

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      A Film About Many Things

      Posted
      SLL2004
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      While settling into my theater seat to view "American Sniper", I had about as high of expectations as any movie I'd seen in the past year. Rarely do those type of expectations ever get lived up to these days, it seems. That was emphatically NOT the case with this film, however, as it captivated me from beginning to end. For a basic plot summary #minor spoilers#, "American Sniper" focuses on the life of Chris Kyle #Bradley Cooper#, who serves multiple terms in Iraq during the early 2000s while wife Taya #Sienna Miller# dutifully waits for him on the homefront with each deployment. Over in Iraq, Chris is an expert sniper Navy Seal, tasked with providing air support and protecting "his guys" from any number of unforeseen calamities #a scene where a young Iraqi boy begins to pick up an explosive device is particular telling on what mental torture Chris's job can be at times#. Because, Chris doesn't want to leave until the "job is done", he's a little bit less himself every single time he returns stateside. This puts particular strain on wife Taya and a growing family that Chris does not know how to integrate back into. One could almost say that "American Sniper" is two movies in one... First, it is a taut psychological spectacle of the type of warfare that was being conducted in Iraq. A sniper from the opposition is nearly Kyle's equal, while a notorious "Butcher" commits atrocities that begin to wear on Kyle's mental faculties. To me, this was the "weaker" portion of the film #though to call it "weak" would be a travesty#, but that's likely because I don't have first-hand experience in that type of environment. It was all kind of surreal to me. A number of people in the group I saw the movie with thought these war/sniping scenes were the best part, so it was probably just personal preference. Secondly, and to me this is where the flick can go down in history, are Kyle's struggles with post-traumatic stress disorder. Each time he returns back to Taya and the family, he is a little bit less himself, and even a bit more anxious to be back to the battlefield. I was utterly fascinated #and quite more than a bit proud# by how a man can voluntarily put himself into harm's way in order to finish the war at hand and have the back of his fellow soldier. These are the scenes where director Clint Eastwood really excels. He knows exactly how to prod the emotions and then get out of the way so as not to seem preachy. So, for me, "American Sniper" made my "top films" list because I've never seen a war film tackle the issue of PTSD so brutally. Usually, a military member returning home will say something like "I saw some things over there" and that's all that will be said. Here, however, the PTSD is actually experienced in chilling fashion. If Bradley Cooper doesn't get serious consideration for his outstanding performance as Chris Kyle, it would be a crying shame. The auxiliary cast is good as well, but Cooper is almost literally front and center in every meaningful scene or exchange in the picture. He'd certainly get my vote for "Best Actor" to get a gold Oscar, that is for sure. Overall, "American Sniper" is one of those films that is tough to "like" even though it is truly a gem. The reason being? It is so hard-hitting. The story of Chris Kyle and his family is one that resonates in this day and age, while Eastwood was the perfect choice to get the most out of it. If you want an insight into many aspects of being a soldier that you had likely never thought of before, "American Sniper" is the film to watch.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

      Over-Rated

      Posted
      Stylez
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      In American Sniper, the 34th film to be directed by Clint Eastwood, Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) rarely has a clear view of the field of battle. As perhaps the most accomplished marksman in US military history, he’s invariably lying on his belly on a dust-blown rooftop, staring down a telescopic sight, methodically picking off one enemy after the next. His experience of war is an endless extreme close-up. Eastwood’s tense and absorbing film was adapted from the memoirs of the real Chris Kyle, a highly decorated American Navy SEAL who served on four tours of duty in Iraq before being honourably discharged in 2009. He was great at what he did, which is to way say he was a skilled and dependable killer. He had 160 confirmed kills to his name – the actual total may have exceeded 250 – and proved so deadly that the Iraqis eventually put a six-figure bounty on his head. But Eastwood doesn’t care about the legend. Instead, he shows us Kyle much as he saw his targets: with that strange combination of extreme intimacy and extreme remove that a long-range sight confers. The film begins by turning its sharpshooting star into a target. During a nerve-wracking confrontation in Fallujah, we watch Kyle take aim at a young boy who’s about to hurl a grenade at his platoon, a neat match-cut whips us back in time to a young Kyle being taught how to hunt by his father in the Texas backwoods. It’s as if the adult is taking aim across time and space at his younger self – abnegating his own life in order to do this job he believes is simultaneously terrible and right. Cooper, who’s bulked up to the size of a largish bottle bank for the role, deftly captures Kyle’s experience of operating in this eerie moral dead zone. (The film’s not interested in the morality of the Iraq War itself, just Kyle’s actions within it.) When he takes a successful shot, often at a near-impossible distance, his colleagues cheer and whoop, but he remains still, silently processing what’s just happened. (His boot-camp instructor encourages him to “find the space between heartbeats” in which take each shot.) The black-and-white simplicity of the mission briefings – move in, clear this, capture that, get out – become trampled into a morass of moral greyness. In that sense, Kyle is a typical Eastwoodian hero: another lone gunman on a wild frontier, trying his best to square his actions with his code. Between tours, Kyle tries to decompress back at home in Texas with his wife Taya, who’s terrifically played by Sienna Miller: with this and her equally subtle, shaded turn in Foxcatcher, she seems to be gearing up for an overdue career renaissance. The couple’s domestic strains aren’t all that interesting or unusual for a film of this type, but Cooper and Miller play them with a clarity and rawness that keep the R&R sequences from feeling like dramatic down-time. Besides, regardless of whether the film has us in a suburban Texan bedroom or a firefight in the shattered Iraqi streets, each scene is built as solidly and methodically as a chest of drawers, with no confusion over where the pieces fit. Panic has never been Eastwood’s style, and even during the climactic shoot-out, where a sandstorm engulfs both sides in a symbolic fog of war, the camera remains perceptive and alert. In the scheme of Eastwood’s career, this comes as something of a relief. After the murky triple-flub of Hereafter, J. Edgar and Jersey Boys, American Sniper brings us back the Eastwood who made Flags of our Fathers and Letters from Iwo Jima, his magnificent paired war films from 2006, and reminds us that the theatre of war – a stark testing ground for manhood – may be the ideal stage for this filmmaker’s late-career concerns. But what’s missing – and what lifted Kathryn Bigelow’s recent, thematically similar war films The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty into the realm of great cinema – is a sense of fatefulness. Kyle’s story, finely textured as it is, doesn’t tell us much about anything other than Kyle himself, whereas the intensely personal stories in Bigelow’s films posed bigger questions, broadening their outlooks even as they narrowed their focus. American Sniper is too direct for that, but it's still a welcome comeback for Eastwood.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      GREAT MOVIE A MUST WATCH

      Posted
      NYCUBAN212
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      Blown away - figuratively speaking, at least! We just watched this, and it was excellent. I saw Chris Kyle's wife cry on the news after watching the trailer, and I have to say, that was probably the most moving and emotional thing I have seen associated with the movie. A few details: As some have pointed out, it did not necessarily follow the book. They had to make a story out of it that everyone would sit and watch, and chose a couple specific scenarios to highlight and romanticize a bit. But this is great storytelling, make no mistake, and Clint Eastwood continues to show why he is one of the most respected directors in the world. There is also more emotional struggle here than in the book, and in my opinion, that makes the main character more relatable. If the performance was quite as cold and had come to terms with his role as the real Chris Kyle, I am not sure we as an audience would have been able to relate. That would be tough to watch. He still has very clear direction and sense of purpose, don't get me wrong. But the reality is truly far beyond what you can display successfully on screen. Bradley Cooper absolutely changes my opinion of him as a lead male actor. I loved things like Hangover, Wedding Crashers, and more serious roles like Limitless and Silver Linings Playbook. But this puts him on a totally different level as an actor. This is grand-scale, emotional story telling, and you will talk about this movie after. You may relate to it politically, you may hold Kyle up as a hero, or perhaps vilify him. But when you look at it from a storytelling aspect, regardless, it is excellent. Just don't expect it to be a documentary. Hint: This film is worth watching in a theater. Not just for the larger than life battle scenes, but for the experience of an entire theater, nearly silent, at the end.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Great movie!

      Posted
      Kingline07
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

      Biopic of Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper), the most-celebrated sniper in American military history. In the aftermath of 9/11, Kyle decides to serve his country by becoming a Navy SEAL. But with each tour of duty, he grows more detached from his wife and children. As the story opens, we meet carefree brothers Chris and Jeff (Keir O'Donnell) as they work the Texas rodeo circuit. They're cowboys through and through, and despite being notably older than the usual enlistee, Chris pays a visit to his local recruitment office and decides to become a Navy SEAL. Later, at the firing range, he draws on his hunting lessons with his stern father to become an expert marksman. A booze-fueled barroom chat with pretty brunette Taya (Sienna Miller) soon leads to wedding bells, and following the terrorist attacks of 9/11, Kyle is deployed to Iraq for his first tour of duty. There, his reputation as a sniper who never misses makes him a legend among his fellow troops, and earns him the moniker "The Devil of Ramadi" from his enemies. With a substantial bounty on his head, Kyle makes it his personal mission to take out a sadistic Iraqi soldier known as "The Butcher," as well as an elusive enemy marksman with a skill to rival his own. The closer he gets to achieving his goals during repeat tours of duty, however, the more fellow soldiers he sees die, and the further he drifts from Taya and their two children back home. It all leads up to a tense rooftop gunfight in a raging sandstorm -- one that convinces the sniper once and for all to make his family his top priority. Unfortunately, all is not well as Kyle struggles to make the transition back to civilian life, but he discovers that helping his fellow veterans is an effective way to do good and make peace with his wartime experiences

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Great character study of an American warrior!

      Posted
      CWLW
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite MemberElite Member

      Story opens with a combined Infantry/Armor rolling attack in Iraq that has a sniper over-watch, then quickly flash-backs to a Texas Deer hunt with Chris and his father and his father’s training of Chris as “the protector.” This biographical film is not just well-written, it is both superbly casted, acted and directed, and it is accompanied by realistic sound effects and a fitting sound track for chosen scenes. Story-line takes you through Kyle’s Texas ranch formative days, his rodeo cowboy era, his Seal Team BUD/S training, his romance and marriage with his wife Taya, and Sniper School. He and his new wife both view in “real time” the 9/11 attack on the NY Twin Towers. Story faithfully tracks his decade of almost constant war experience thru his 4 Tours of combat service and the story will reach out and touch you often – you really get “inside” the story and share it with Chris Kyle. The author really picked-up on the combat vets response to smells, sounds and actions, that even thou effected in a Stateside environment, caused a response by a combat vet suffering from PTSD. If the films ending with “film credits” don’t get-to-you then you are truly made of stone. This film is a fitting tribute to a great American hero – it’s an emotional human story and a story of what war can take from you – and the struggle of the balance of two worlds: that of war and a family caring for one another. The hardships that families face during deployment and the eventual reunion with their warrior is surfaced and treated with the care that it deserves. It’s a rewarding view that you will want to return to.

      I would recommend this to a friend

    • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

      Great

      Posted
      Heygurl40
      • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
      • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

      o Blown away - figuratively speaking, at least! We just watched this, and it was excellent. I saw Chris Kyle's wife cry on the news after watching the trailer, and I have to say, that was probably the most moving and emotional thing I have seen associated with the movie. A few details: As some have pointed out, it did not necessarily follow the book. They had to make a story out of it that everyone would sit and watch, and chose a couple specific scenarios to highlight and romanticize a bit. But this is great storytelling, make no mistake, and Clint Eastwood continues to show why he is one of the most respected directors in the world. There is also more emotional struggle here than in the book, and in my opinion, that makes the main character more relatable. If the performance was quite as cold and had come to terms with his role as the real Chris Kyle, I am not sure we as an audience would have been able to relate. That would be tough to watch. He still has very clear direction and sense of purpose, don't get me wrong. But the reality is truly far beyond what you can display successfully on screen. Bradley Cooper absolutely changes my opinion of him as a lead male actor. I loved things like Hangover, Wedding Crashers, and more serious roles like Limitless and Silver Linings Playbook. But this puts him on a totally different level as an actor. This is grand-scale, emotional story telling, and you will talk about this movie after. You may relate to it politically, you may hold Kyle up as a hero, or perhaps vilify him. But when you look at it from a storytelling aspect, regardless, it is excellent. Just don't expect it to be a documentary.

      I would recommend this to a friend



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