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  • Specifications
    Product Height
    11 13/16 inches
    Product Width
    21 7/32 inches
    Product Depth
    17 7/16 inches
    App Compatible
    No
    Microwave Type
    Countertop
    Sensor Cook
    Yes
depth 17 7/16 inches
Panasonic - 1.3 Cu. Ft. 1100 Watt SD69LS Microwave with Sensor Cooking - Stainless Steel - Front_Standard
height 11 13/16 inches
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Panasonic - 1.3 Cu. Ft. 1100 Watt SD69LS Microwave with Sensor Cooking - Stainless Steel

Model:NN-SD69LS
SKU:6405687
Your price for this item is $159.99
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This Product
 
Product Height
11 13/16 inches
12 1/8 inches
12 inches
11 15/16 inches
Product Width
21 7/32 inches
21 3/8 inches
20 5/16 inches
21 7/8 inches
Product Depth
17 7/16 inches
17 inches
15 5/8 inches
19 7/16 inches

Reviews

Rating 4.4 out of 5 stars with 812 reviews

Rating by feature

  • Rating 4.7 out of 5 stars

  • Rating 4.5 out of 5 stars

  • Rating 4.5 out of 5 stars

89%would recommend to a friend

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The vast majority of our reviews come from verified purchases. Reviews from customers may include My Best Buy members, employees, and Tech Insider Network members (as tagged). Select reviewers may receive discounted products, promotional considerations or entries into drawings for honest, helpful reviews.

  • Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    Very practical and easy to clean

    Microwave is beautiful, easy to clean and control buttons are ergonomically placed , the main start button is great,I can use it to increase time and start it too. Display is easy to read from a distance but a little too bright. Great microwave features and easy to operate. I actually now use this microwave everyday

    Posted by JDMartin

  • Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    POWERFUL MICROWAVE OVEN WITH UNIQUE CONTROLS

    The Panasonic Model NN-SD69LS is a powerful 1100 watt, 1.3 cu ft. capacity, countertop microwave oven. The rotating glass turntable is a large 12.75”. The approximate dimensions are: Exterior: 21.25” wide x 16.5” deep x 12.0” tall – Interior: 13.875” wide x 14.75” deep x 8.375” tall. The NN-SD69LS is a hefty 43 lbs. Features with dedicated control buttons include 3 level Popcorn setting, Sensor Reheat, Sensor Cook, 10 Power Level settings, Auto Defrost and Keep Warm and Add 30 Seconds. The cooking tray rotates whenever the oven is in operation. Tray rotation cannot be switched off to accommodate large square or rectangular platters or casseroles. The audible, end of cycle beeping alert feature also cannot be switched off. The large, white LED display is bright and easy to read from across the room. None of the function labels on the display and none of the switches are illuminated. Most of the labeling lacks contrast and is not particularly easy to read. The Auto Defrost feature requires determining the weight of the frozen food and using a Conversion Chart and Defrosting Chart to estimate the correct “Auto-Defrost” setting. We found it to be more effort than it was worth. Sensor Cooking and Sensor Reheating rely upon the detection of steam in the oven cavity, produced when food is heated. If the door is opened to actually check the temperature / doneness of the food, the steam vents out and the “Sensor Cooking / Reheating” is defeated and cancelled. We found this feature to be of little to no benefit, as well. Every microwave oven that we have owned or used since the 1970’s has had a digital touchpad for setting cooking time, power levels, timer functions, etc. Many also included additional “feature buttons” or other dedicated function buttons, to augment the numerical touchpad and facilitate the ease of use and convenience of the microwave oven. The Panasonic NN-SD69LS, and several other Panasonic microwave oven models, deviates from that standard. Rather than providing a numeric touchpad, this microwave employs electromechanical buttons for feature/function selection, and an electromechanical rotary dial for setting time intervals for cooking, defrosting, timer, etc. Where a digital touchpad permits direct entry of any digits or combination thereof, the rotary dial application of the NN-SD69LS is more restrictive and more limiting. There is no ability to set intervals in 1 second increments, at all. The minimum time interval which can be utilized is 5 seconds. For setting intervals of less than, and up to 1 minute, the rotary dial advances in 5 second increments. From 1 – 5 minutes, the time accumulates in 10 second increments. From 5 – 10 minutes, the time setting adds 30 second increments. From 10 – 30 minutes (which is the maximum cooking time available) and for timer settings between 10 – 90 minutes, the time increment is 1 minute intervals. If you need to heat something for 1 minute – 35 seconds, or 5 minutes – 15 seconds, or any other combination that does not conform to the fixed time intervals provided by the rotary dial, you will need to abandon such precise time settings. It is apparent that those incrementally longer time intervals are by design intended to reduce the number of full rotations of the rotary dial needed in order to arrive at the desired setting. Nevertheless, you are still required to spin the dial quite a bit, and are restricted to accepting a time setting which may only approximate the setting that is actually needed. Through daily use of microwave ovens, we often ascertain relatively precise cooking settings for certain foods. The ability to set cooking times with greater accuracy and precision is valuable, as it enhances the convenience and ease of use of a microwave oven. With the less granular settings available with the rotary dial, it necessitates adding additional cooking time after a cycle has ended, or using the next longer available interval, and standing close watch over the cooking progress in order to manually shut off the microwave before the food burns or liquid boils over. We find the rotary dial, with its limited and imprecise time interval settings to be a nuisance and inconvenience. That is the very antithesis of why we all own microwave ovens; for convenience and conservation of time and effort. Many Panasonic microwave models offer a beneficial technology which enhances microwave cooking and reheating. Panasonic is one of very few manufacturers who have offered Inverter Technology. Most microwave ovens, including the Panasonic NN-SD69LS, use conventional magnetron (the microwave energy producing component) technology. Conventional magnetrons run only at full power level. When using a “reduced power level”, such as when defrosting, the microwave still runs the magnetron at full power, but cycles the magnetron on and off for varying time intervals. You can see and hear the magnetron cycling in pulses. Resultantly, the food is being exposed to full power microwave radiation during the “on” pulses, and no microwave radiation during the “off” pulses. When set to “50%” power, the conventional magnetron is still producing 100% power through the alternating on and off cycles. The common phenomenon of uneven cooking, burning hot outer edges and cold centers of food, and the need to rearrange or stir the food in order to get a more even cooking result is typical. Inverter microwaves however, modulate the power level of the magnetron. Therefore at the half-power level, the Inverter Magnetron will only emit 50% power, rather than pulsing on and off at 100% power to simulate a lower power level. The application of lower power levels on a continuous basis, results in more evenly cooked food, defrosting without cooked or burned edges, and the ability to keep foods warm until you are ready to serve them. An additional benefit of Inverter technology is that the large and heavy transformer and high-voltage capacitor which power the magnetron are replaced with a more compact and lighter power supply. In fact, while this 1.3 cu ft. NN-SD69LS weighs a substantial 43 lbs., a Panasonic 1.3 cu ft. model with Inverter technology weighs over 15 lbs. less and has slightly reduced external depth. Inverter microwave ovens are typically quieter as well (fan noise, notwithstanding). I can attest from first-hand experience that a Panasonic Inverter Technology microwave oven heats evenly and produces excellent cooking results, particularly at reduced power levels such as those used for reheating and defrosting. The NN-SD69LS does generally perform basic cooking well. Its cooking speed is just as expected from an 1100 watt oven. The Panasonic NN-SD69LS is powerful, at 1100 watts, although in the same price range Panasonic also offers more powerful, 1200 watt and 1250 watt models. The “Easy-Clean” interior of the NN-SD69LS is apparently coated with dark gray epoxy paint. The dark gray color, coupled with an anemic, incandescent interior light makes it a challenge to see the interior well. This is particularly problematic if you are conscientious about keeping the interior clean. Splatters on the interior of the oven cavity (which still occur even with best efforts to always properly cover or wrap food when cooking) are very difficult to see without employing a supplemental light source. While it is true that microwave ovens with white interiors will show every splatter, it is actually much easier to keep the interior clean when you can actually see the dirt. The interior light of the NN-SD69LS is not only lacking in brightness, it is my understanding that the bulb is not user replaceable. Cleaning the interior of fresh splatters requires some scrubbing effort. Cleaning “baked-on” splatters which eluded cleaning due to poor visibility would undoubtedly be a challenge. The 1.3 cu ft. interior is spacious, albeit poorly illuminated and dark. It easily accommodates large dinner plates and most casseroles on the large 12.75” diameter rotating glass tray. The microwave oven is large and relatively heavy. The electromechanical controls, comprised of mechanical buttons and a rotating knob, in lieu of the much more common electronic, touchpad controls may be a “matter of taste”. However, we find the unusual controls to be a nuisance and inconvenient. The inability to select precise cooking/timer settings is limiting, restrictive and inconvenient, at best. Being limited to setting cooking times in 5, 10, 30 and 60 second increments, while spinning a dial for many revolutions, is far less convenient and efficient than using a simple and straightforward numeric touchpad. The lack of Panasonic Inverter Technology on the NN-SD69LS, may also diminish the efficiency, performance level and most importantly, cooking results (even and thorough heating without cold centers, burned edges and the necessity to repeatedly rearrange or stir the food being heated/cooked). Each of the foregoing limitations of the NN-SD69LS when taken by itself, affects the convenience, user-friendliness, efficiency and user-satisfaction associated with this model. Considered together, they suggest considering other models. Other Panasonic models might be better choices. Panasonic offers similarly priced (and even lower priced) microwave oven models with the same 1.3 cu ft. capacity, with the same 1100 watt and even higher powered 1200 and 1250 watt capability, electronic, numeric touchpad controls and Inverter Technology magnetrons. I believe that one of those Panasonic models, particularly with the attributes of touchpad controls and Inverter Technology, might represent a superior choice and value, and will be more satisfactory in terms of convenience, cooking efficiency and results, and user satisfaction.

    Posted by Curmudgeon1

  • Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Dial it In

    It’s hard to get excited over a microwave. Most everyone needs one, and they’re usually bought to replace another one that’s old or broken. The humble appliance has changed little in the last few decades - it’s changed styles, become more compact, and cooked more efficiently, but no matter how a manufacturer cuts it, it’s still a microwave. Panasonic’s latest microwave does little to rock the proven formula besides eschewing the traditional number pad for a rotary dial, angling to add a touch of professional appearance to the old kitchen food-zapper. I’m pleased to report that, yes, it’s a microwave, and a good one at that, so long as you’re willing to take a week or two to keep the manual handy and read the instructions. - Setup & Appearance This is a much larger microwave than I expected - it barely fits on the dedicated shelf in my kitchen and dwarfs the previous 1.1 cubic foot unit I had previously. It sits slightly shorter than other microwaves so most of the the additional heft comes from depth - it’s about 17 inches deep without the cord protector, 18.5 with. Note that the heavy gauge power cord goes straight into the socket rather than at a 90-degree angle, so it will need an additional inch or so to not bend the cord at a damaging angle. The microwave should fit fine on most countertops and small fridges, but use in a dedicated cubby may be tricky as Panasonic recommends a 4 inch clearance minimum on all sides for venting. This Panasonic microwave has a clean, minimalist aesthetic that leans more professional or commercial than residential thanks to the dial as its primary control. It is definitely a step up from other microwaves and the white LED display is easy to read from across the room. The black and stainless front is a match for most modern kitchens, though the sides and top are a silver-grey color that oddly stands out more against off-color countertops or cabinets. - In Use The interior of the microwave has a cooking space approximately 14 inches wide, 14 inches deep, and 8 inches tall. The glass platter is about 12 and a half inches in diameter, making it plenty for medium to large size casserole containers. The interior is clean and lined with what appears to be a nonstick finish on all corners, making splatter cleanup a breeze. At 1100 watts, the Panasonic microwave is on par with similar microwaves in its size class, but I find it cooks slightly quicker and much more evenly than the budget microwave I had previously. During cooking, the heating element and exhaust fan are both noticeably quieter than older microwave models I’ve used. Being a programmable microwave, cooking times and powers can be set at the start of the cooking cycle by setting power, setting cook time, then pressing power again to set the next power that should be used to cook before entering the time, and repeating as needed. I found it somewhat useful for recipes that call for cooking stages, or simply running a defrost cycle for certain foods then transitioning straight into cooking, but these are rare occurrences since most cycle changes involve removing, shifting, or reseating the food before the next stage begins. Further, second and subsequent stages are limited to power level 8, making this mode’s versatility even more limited. Otherwise, this is a microwave through and through. Set your power if you need to, set your time or just hit “+ Quick 30” a couple times, and you’re on your way. You could use it like this for many years, but this model has a few convenience features that aim to take what little guesswork still exists in microwave cooking out of the equation. - Auto Defrost & Sensor Cooking Coming from an older microwave, automatic defrosting takes some time to get used to. The routine will set the microwave for what seems to be an uncomfortably long cooking time, but the defrost program works very well to rapidly, safely thaw meats and leftovers. The microwave beeps when the food should be turned over, rearranged, or broken up, which facilitates even defrosting. I found auto-defrost to be one of the best features of the microwave as I always had trouble getting traditional microwaves to defrost food without inadvertently overcooking it, yet I had little trouble here. Be mindful of the weight measurement you enter as this has a significant impact on effectiveness. Sensor cooking is an interesting feature that I did not have in previous microwaves. Ten different foods can be auto-cooked using this method, ranging from baked potatoes to stews, vegetables, fish, and casseroles. The microwave will go through pre-determined cooking cycles until it detects the appropriate amount of steam coming from your food and then finish on a standard timed cycle. The instruction manual details the preparation steps and any user action needed mid-cooking, again signified by a beep when the time comes. Sensor cooking is an imprecise science as preferences for doneness vary, but this is easily addressed on the microwave with “More” and “Less” buttons, which will add or remove 10% of cooking time up to 20% in either direction. I find the microwave errs on the side of slightly less done, particularly with larger portions, so this is a handy adjustment to have available when cooking begins. - User Interface My issues with the microwave are ones that will go away after overcoming the learning curve of the dial and the various auto-cook functions. The biggest problem I have is that the buttons and dial are simply unresponsive to fast, rapid inputs - I need to consciously slow down as I press the “power” button repeatedly to drop power levels as rapid presses will not register quickly. The same issue plagues the dial - fast spins will reach your target time slower than if you gently rotate the dial. What’s worrisome is that the dial is at the same time very sensitive to register notches, resulting in at least one instance where I accidentally changed sensor cooking recipes as I tried to start. The stepping of the dial to set cook times overall makes sense, stepping in 5-second increments up to 1:00, 10-second increments up to 5:00, 30-second increments up to 10:00, and minute increments thereafter, but I’ve come across a few odd times where a frozen food needs 65 or 75 seconds, requiring a 35 or 45 second setting with a “+30” addition. The only other issue I have is that the microwave’s beeps are a little too quiet, which was originally a welcome change from the loud, wailing noise my last microwave made, but it’s hard to hear the sensor cooking notifications over the sound of the exhaust fan unless you are standing near the microwave when time expires. There’s no volume adjustment available, which would have been a nice touch. - Bottom Line Needless to say I didn’t expect something as ubiquitous as a microwave to have a learning curve, but it doesn’t take terribly long to adjust. I wouldn’t recommend this to someone who isn’t willing to read a manual to learn how to use a microwave’s features, but to all others the small learning curve is worth the few days’ investment for a clean design and smooth, quiet cooking. It is a little pricier than similar models at this size and output power, but design is a premium feature in modern appliances that will either make or break your kitchen ensemble. Above all else it’s a food-zapper, and a solid one at that, so the Panasonic 1.3 Cubic Foot Microwave with Sensor Cooking comes recommended!

    Posted by Turbolence

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