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  • Specifications
    Noise Cancelling (Active)
    Yes
    Sound Mode
    Stereo
    Connection Type
    Wireless, Wired
    Wireless Connectivity
    Bluetooth
    True Wireless
    No
    Maximum Wireless Range
    33 feet
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Sennheiser - HD 458BT Wireless Noise Cancelling Headphones (HD 458BT Exclusive) - Black/Red

Model:HD 458BT
SKU:6422051
Your price for this item is $199.98
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Noise Cancelling (Active)
Yes
No
Yes
Sound Mode
Stereo
Data Not Available--
Stereo
Connection Type
Wireless, Wired
Wired
Wireless

Reviews

Rating 4.1 out of 5 stars with 934 reviews

Rating by feature

  • Rating 4.3 out of 5 stars

  • Rating 4.5 out of 5 stars

  • Rating 4.3 out of 5 stars

78%would recommend to a friend

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The vast majority of our reviews come from verified purchases. Reviews from customers may include My Best Buy members, employees, and Tech Insider Network members (as tagged). Select reviewers may receive discounted products, promotional considerations or entries into drawings for honest, helpful reviews.

  • Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    Good sound for that price

    I read many good reviews about the sound quality and decided to try this company for my next headphones. Suddenly, my Beats Studio 3 headphones were broken (due to really bad design quality), so I decided to give these headphones a try and I'm really glad about my choice. I give it 4 stars only because the headphones are smaller than Beats Studio; it's a really good product, but Beats was more comfortable – just that. I can recommend, if you have a chance to try this product in person, try it before buying.

    Posted by Chocobo

  • Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    Got Your Ears On?

    Sennheiser was the brand that started me down the road to becoming an audiophile. Their HD280PRO headphones were the starting point into a journey that spiraled through countless further headphones, amplifiers, a resurgence of CDs, lossless audio codecs, and more. I still reach for a set of Sennheiser cans when I want to really listen to some music, and now it seems they want me to reach for one of their products when I need a bluetooth headset, too. The HD450BT’s are as well-rounded a set of bluetooth headphones I can fathom, knocking it out of the park where audio quality is concerned, but a few small issues both personal and objective give me pause. A disclaimer - headphones are a tough item to review when comfort and sound are the two major factors that influence the buying decision. Though things like frequency response can be measured, sensations of comfort and sound are extremely subjective. My impressions will be different from someone else’s, and as such I would recommend finding an avenue where you can sample these headphones, such as in-store at Best Buy, before buying them. - Physical Impressions One of the first things I noticed after unboxing the headphones is that the earpads are not sized as expected. Marketed as an “over-the-ear” set of headphones, the diameter of the pads are over an inch shorter than Sennheiser’s wired over-the-ear offerings, and thus fit much more like a set of “on-ear” headphones as a result. This is a very odd design or marketing choice since true over-ear headphones disperse their clamping force around the ear and need less pressure to seal off sound for passive noise canceling, while the HD450BTs press onto the ears. The biggest drawback from an on-ear design is that extended comfort is difficult to achieve, at least in my case. I couldn’t wear these headphones for more than an hour or two before I had to take a break. Even though foam inside the pads is very soft, and the leather padding equally forgiving, I just couldn’t find a position that was comfortable after the first half-hour. Your experience may vary greatly, however - my head and ears are on the larger side with my preferences formed from years of wearing over-ear headphones. Fortunately, the headset is reasonably lightweight without feeling cheap. There’s just the right amount of heft here that makes it feel like a premium device without it weighing your head down, and the clamping force is enough that it won’t slip off your ears while walking or turning your head. - Headset Controls All of the buttons on the HD450BT are on the right earphone and can be thumb-operated. The power button serves multiple functions depending on the length of time it’s held, including noise cancellation toggle and pairing mode. The volume rocker is easy enough to use, with a physical nub on one end to signify volume up, and a “digital assistant” button triggers Google Assistant when connected to Android phones and Siri when connected to iOS ones. The media and call buttons are set on a spring-loaded rocker with a push-click, and I found this the most troublesome to use both in that the center press (play/pause) usually also resulted in a slip where I pushed either direction and the playlist skipped forward or back accordingly. Needless to say there’s a learning curve with the button layout, but because the media buttons double as call controls, I found myself continually pressing play/pause expecting my music player to resume from my phone’s home screen but instead it would act as a call control by default and dial the last person I spoke with. This functionality occurred on PC as well, where pressing play/pause didn’t hook to the media app first, and instead tried to place a call on my default messenger. Not sure if this is the headset’s fault or issues with my own configuration. - Active Noise Canceling (ANC) The selling point for bluetooth headphones in this price range is noise-canceling. Active Noise Canceling, or ANC, uses microphones on both sides of the headset and a small onboard computer to listen to noises in the surrounding environment and play an opposite, offsetting tone inside the headset at the same time, causing a sensation where the listener hears little to none of the noise. The quality of noise cancelation depends greatly on the quality of the microphones and algorithms used in the headset, and Sennheiser’s are among the better I’ve tried. The headphones are able to cancel out a lot of droning background noise (such as HVAC systems, engines of trucks driving by the office) and quiet down abrupt noises (such as typing on a loud keyboard) by about half. It’s a solid performance all around. - Sound Quality Sennheiser’s reputation for high-quality audio makes its mark here - the HD450BT’s sound great all around when ANC is enabled. These sound very close to their HD380 PRO headphones, a highly-regarded set of studio monitors, though perhaps lacking just a tiny bit in power comparatively (as is expected when comparing a wired headphone to a bluetooth one). These get quite loud as you approach max volume, and I didn’t pick up a hint of distortion on the way. The signature trait of Sennheiser headphones is replicated here just about perfectly - bass is incredibly clear and balanced so that they neither “boom” nor “punch.” Competing headphones in the lower price brackets will assuredly have one of those profiles to their sound, but here you get just the bass as you expect it. Midrange and treble are also well balanced to the point where the headphones seem to have a pretty flat response curve overall. Small adjustments to equalizer settings are all you need to dial in your preferred sound balance, since these start so neutral already. Sadly, the bass falls off by a considerable margin when ANC is disabled, resulting in tinny audio that doesn’t sound all too great for most kinds of music. It’s probably better for calls, podcasts, and TV shows at that point. - Microphone & Call Sidetone Speaking of things involving a lot of talking, the HD450BT’s biggest weakness is its microphone or set of microphones it uses for calls. While I expected just passable sound quality since voice microphones are difficult to get right when the microphone is by the ears rather than by the mouth, the audio is still not particularly great, with those I called all noticing my voice sounding hollow, low-frequency, and somewhat distant. But the worst part about making calls on the HD450BT’s is by far the sidetone, or the little bit of vocal feedback that goes from microphone to headset to compensate for the wearer’s ears being covered. Most headsets simulate this just fine, but in the Sennheiser’s case, the sidetone volume is both too loud and has a delay. This results in a voice echo that’s incredibly distracting and irritating, and I found no way to disable or adjust the sidetone. I haven’t experienced this on any of the other headsets I own, wired or wireless, and it frustrates me to the point where I found myself wishing I had the time to turn off bluetooth when I answer a call and just use the handset rather than dealing with the echo. - Range & Battery Life Connection range on the headset is very strong. I left my phone on one end of the house and walked all over searching for where it would drop, but the connection held solid everywhere I went and it wasn’t until I stepped outside and got about 20 feet from the door that I finally lost connection. An impressive performance - I’m sure the bluetooth antenna extends into the headband. Battery life is similarly impressive. Although my time in testing has been limited to only a few hours of use so far, the headset reported 95% battery remaining after several hours of listening with ANC enabled. I have no doubt that the headset will hit Sennheiser’s rated 20-25 hours of battery life estimate, and when it does need to recharge it uses the familiar, ubiquitous USB-C port to get back to full in just 2 hours from a properly-spec’d charger. - Bottom Line Though I’m not a fan of on-ear headphones, Sennheiser’s HD450BT’s deliver great sound, strong noise cancelation, and a bevy of features that earn their spot on the shelf next to the high-end headsets. The weak microphone, sidetone issue, and frustrating controls detract from an otherwise solid headset that’s well-built and has a long battery life. I just wish they were proper over-ear headphones so I could wear them comfortably for a longer period of time, but if on-ears are the style that you prefer for your headphones, then the HD450BT’s come recommended.

    Posted by Turbolence

  • Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Sennheiser HD 458BT wireless noise cancelling

    Sennheiser HD 458BT wireless noise cancelling headphones are extremely good. The noise cancelling headphones do a great job and align with the advertised specifications. Costly but the sound quality is worth the money

    Posted by Tony

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