The Big Short [DVD] [2015]

  • SKU: 4921700
  • Release Date: 03/15/2016
  • Rating: R
$5.99
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Overview

Ratings & Reviews


Overall Customer Rating:
95% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (601 out of 636)

Special Features


  • Closed Captioned

Synopsis


The Big Short
This adaptation of Michael Lewis' nonfiction book The Big Short explores the 2008 financial crisis through the lens of four unorthodox moneymen, who foresaw the consequences of the fraudulent mortgage-lending practices of large banks on Wall Street. Christian Bale plays Michael Burry, a former hedge-fund manager who was one of the first to forecast the collapse of the credit bubble due to excessive subprime lending. Steve Carell is Mark Baum (based on the real-life Steve Eisman), a money manager who rose to fame after successfully betting against subprime mortgages. Directed by Adam McKay. Brad Pitt, Ryan Gosling, and Marisa Tomei co-star. ~ Erin Demers, Rovi

Cast & Crew


  • Christian Bale
    Christian Bale - Michael Burry
  • Steve Carell
    Steve Carell - Mark Baum
  • Ryan Gosling
    Ryan Gosling - Jared Vennett
  • Brad Pitt
    Brad Pitt - Ben Rickert
  • Melissa Leo
    Melissa Leo - Georgia Hale



Overall customer rating

4.5
95%
would recommend to a friend
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Better than I thought

    Posted
    DDunnDatBoi
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    Comedy is tragedy + time, right? We're now over 7 years out from the apex of the American financial crisis, which spiraled outward across the world, and yet what has really changed? People are still making millions/billions off the suffering of others, corporate control reigns supreme, fraud is common and remains largely unknown, wealth continues to be ever more concentrated in the grasp of a few, and the remainder of the populace are treated as proverbial rats and made to feel uncouth should they question the system and question not wanting to live their lives playing this sadistic game. Taking 2 pennies and selling them to someone for a hundred dollars remains a legal activity, just call those pennies by a different name and suddenly it's okay to pass them off as fair market. It doesn't sound funny at all, but The Big Short succeeds in turning this demented and corrupt circus into something improbably hilarious and probing. The power of comedy is its ability to let us see something from a different viewpoint, allow us to process it in ways we wouldn't have been able to otherwise. As we might laugh at children for the hilariously unaware things they say and do, so too will humankind in the future hopefully laugh at how completely pathetic and ignorant our present society has been. Martin Scorsese opened the flap up into the circus entrance with "The Wolf of Wall Street" and, while making good points, was perhaps a bit too concerned with his own technique and had a bit too much indulgence reveling in the frivolity of it all. The Big Short completely blows the top of the circus and dissects it in every way, starting with the widespread fraud and greed in business, and then examining how it has seeped into our entire existences. Even the good guys here are ultimately out there to make money, lots of it. Isn't that what society tells us we must to do, in order to be valuable? It's sick. McKay's approach here is "throw everything in, including the kitchen sink" and that creates an energetic, brilliantly matched representation of the subject matter. This does not mean he is lacking control, however. The story being told includes so many facets and characters that it easily could have fallen into disarray, but McKay makes every single character memorable and illuminates every piece of jargon that could be confusing from the outset. It's a huge accomplishment and a far more important one than might seem apparent. The things that were allowed to happen in the realms of business, finance, and banking are absolutely INSANE and unbelievable. It has to be largely comedic because there's no other way of delivering this vast amount of information and complete failure of our entire society and make it all snap into place so continuously, without being ripped apart by the overwhelming darkness of it all. This isn't simply circumstantial and theoretical and mysterious to a degree, as in Oliver Stone's "JFK", but the cold hard truth. It's not enough to even ask for the truth anymore and ask for answers, we need to question the entire system, a whole web of poisonous bonds that have tightly wound themselves so entirely around us. The work of the film itself is allowing us to project our thoughts, our fears, our anger, and our confusions into this convoluted conundrum. All while being told the truth, so that we at least have a place to even start down the correct path of understanding. It's acting as our own investigative journey in a time when actual news and journalism has become a tiny spec of its former self. We now have more information than ever available to us, yet it's often so shrouded and twisted as to become unrecognizable. There are still those who fear education for what it would do to their own position in life, how it would challenge their own reality. We are still held under the thumb of "greed is good", "thinking you're inherently better is good", "vanity is good". The shiny mainstream hallmarks of a typical Hollywoood commercial product - the agreeable lighting and manicured actors and tidy locations - are so perfectly representative in this film of the emptiness within the characters and indeed in our entire society. After all the progress we think we've made towards world peace and human rights and medical advances and the stability of the human race, have we lost sight of what a fulfilling life and a world of justice should really be? Aren't we still captive to the same pointless rituals and superficialities, doesn't a veritable monarch and royal court still control most everything? We are now living our lives working for something that can be wiped out with the stroke of a keyboard. We are told something of monetary worth that is non-existent, for all intents and purposes, is something we should strive for. Making a bet on the outcome of another bet is a whole industry. The non-existent and ridiculous and pointless directly hurts the lives of many. The Big Short is one of the most important films of this era and one of the best. I wanted to laugh and cry at the same time. It is an illumination, a magical pairing of a director's sensibility to exactly the correct form that most fully allows it to blossom and hold water. It is water which the film warns us will be the next basic human necessity to be denied by those few who hold powe

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    4.0 stars... riveting, and revolting

    Posted
    SLL2004
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    "The Big Short" (2015 release; 130 min.# looks at a small group of people who came to realize that the housing bubble building up in the early and mid-2000 was unsustainable, and that the various financial products issued by Wall Street eventually would collapse. As the movie opens, we ge a short introduction on how banking evolved from a boring people's industry back in the 1980s to the hot shot market it would become in the new century. We then get introduced to Dr. Michael Burry #played by Christian Bale#, a socially awkward fellow who loves heavy metal music and has an uncanny nose for spotting new trends in the financial markets. We also get to know Mark Baum #played by Steve Carell#, an investment manager recovering from his brother's suicide and bent on calling out BS whenever he sees it. At this point we're 15 min. into the movie but to tell you more would spoil your viewing experience, you'll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out. Couple of comments: first, this is the latest movie from pretty much the same production team that brought us "Moneyball" a few years ago, also based on the book by Michael Lewis, with Brad Pitt's "Plan B" production company being the main driver. Pitt, a central player in "Moneyball" here plays a smaller role. Second, "The Big Short" is directed by Adam McKay, best known for the "Anchorman" movies. In fact, there is a certain sense of irony and implausibility that is common to both "Anchorman" and "The Big Short". Not that "the Big Short" is a comedy or funny in any way. On the contrary, "The Big Short" is dead-serious in its assault on all things Wall Street, and rightfully so. You will revolt at the shady, and worse, practices that are going on. "An atomic bomb of stupidity and fraud" is how Steve Carell's character sums it up. Third, the acting performances are top-notch throughout, none more so #in my book anyway# than Christian Bale's tour de force as the socially awkward Dr. Burry. Ryan Gosling is also noteworthy, but the single biggest surprise is of course the cameo appearance by Selena Gomez, who pops in to explain the latest financial instrument #"synthetic CDO"# in lay-man's terms. Yes, we literally get schooled by various celebrities #also appearing is Margot Robbie, among others# on what all the various financial products that the banks concoct mean in language that we can understand #not that it mattered, I still don't understand them#. Lastly, please note that the camera work is quite rough, with endless super close-ups and/or out of focus shorts. It is the only aspect of an otherwise perfect movie that I'd call "an action movie for the brainiac". Also, if you wonder whether Led Zeppelin's "When The Levee Breaks" #which played prominently in the movie's trailer# is featured in the movie, no worries: it plays over the end titles.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Adam McKay Delivers the Goods

    Posted
    VandyPrice
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    In the context of the film it makes perfect sense, but squeezed in among last seasons holiday releases The Big Short unfortunately seemed to be one of the more forgettable titles. It helped marginally that the faces on the poster are four of Hollywood's heaviest hitters with Brad Pitt bringing in the biggest pull (and ironically putting in the least amount of screen time), but even this didn't feel like enough to distract moviegoers from what is always a saturated market only made worse here by a complicated story that has been relayed in sardonic terms by the director of Anchorman. Of course, if you've payed attention to any of Adam McKay's work you'd know the director of Anchorman and other such Will Ferrell comedies including Talladega Nights and The Other Guys is actually the perfect choice for a film that desires to tell of the housing market crash that occurred in America in 2008. It is a story in need of sharp social commentary, of a mind that might give the boring numbers game an insightful twist and McKay is able to deliver on all fronts by crafting a final product that is as funny and stinging as it is heartbreaking and tragic-a detriment, almost, to the American spirit. And yet, throughout the over two hour runtime the film never ceases to be breathlessly entertaining. There is so much going on, so many words being spoken, so many deals being made, and so many new characters being introduced at such rapid rates that we never have time to settle in, but rather stay perched on the edge of our seats. With its hands in so many different pots it would be easy for the The Big Short to go off the rails, but somewhat unexpectedly the film finds a certain groove in its latter half that, while not matching the frenetic speed of the first two acts, brings in the necessary levity that strikes the perfect balance between both the ridiculousness of the situation and the dire real world consequences. McKay, working from his and Charles Randolph's screenplay that is based on the book by Michael Lewis (The Blind Side, Moneyball), is able to remain so laser focused on what makes these characters so interesting in their own right that the fact they exist in this compelling real world situation is only icing on the cake.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    It Takes A Funnyman to Tackle This Serious Issue

    Posted
    ANDM
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    Director Adam McKay is best known for his comedies with Will Ferrell ("Anchorman," "Talladega Nights"), so by his own reckoning he probably was the last person expected to tackle adapting Michael Lewis's bestselling book about a handful of misfit investors who noticed the housing bubble in the mid-2000s and "shorted" the market in the years before 2008's crash. However, he proves to be the perfect choice-boiling down complex financial jargon in a way that is easy for a layperson to understand, often through the use of celebrity cameos like Anthony Bourdain or Selena Gomez. The actors playing the investors (led by Christian Bale, Steve Carrell, and Ryan Gosling) are all excellent, and although McKay keeps the pace breezy and injects a lot of humor into the proceedings, this is an angry film, angry at the greed and stupidity of the banks responsible for the collapse, at the weakness of the government regulators to stop it, and the absence of meaningful journalistic scrutiny to let the public know what was happening. And the widespread pain caused by the crash is on full display (the irony that the "heroes" of the film are getting rich at the expense of most Americans is not lost on anyone). The Big Short was nominated for multiple Oscars and is rightly regarded as one of 2015's best films. The Blu-ray delivers excellent picture and sound, and a handful of solid extras (although a commentary would have been nice). Well worth a purchase.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Must see movie

    Posted
    Jimbo
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    After the Wall Street/Big banks meltdown of 2008 that precipitated a worldwide recession, this movie is must see viewing. Steve Karel stars, plus cameo spots by many big stars in the entertainment world. But that's not what makes it a great movie. It is the content that explains derivatives and some other complex Wall Street tricks that makes this an important film. And, with government oversight being cut short at every opportunity, it is possible that this, or something worse, could happen again. And with greed at the core of it all, sadly, it probably will happen again. The only caution--- being a realistic depiction of events at that time--- there is some profanity in the movie. But when viewed overall, the whole meltdown and its causes were profane--- so it fits!

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Great Story! Great Actors! Phenomenal film!

    Posted
    mocmonkey
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    The film shines with a terrific script and subject on hand-- The big dive of the housing market back in 2008, and the people who were smart enough to capitalize on it! The film is audience friendly and really tries to explain most of the banking terms and info we need in order to get what they are talking about. The film also lends great talents such as, Christian Bale, Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Brad Pitt, and more, in portraying these real life characters who saw this coming when no one else would. A film I've watched 10 times already! Amazing pace. Great writing. Great acting. Also, winner of the oscar for best adapted screenplay, by the way.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    A Film Worth Owning

    Posted
    UserL
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    I did not know what to expect from this film, so I read through as many critic reviews as I could before deciding on purchasing the Blu-ray. It's certainly not a new argument - that the U.S. financial sector was largely responsible for the recent collapse of our economy - yet this film manages to add nuance and fresh insights as well as eccentric characters making the film a fresh and enjoyable cinematic experience. The acting, directing, and writing of the film are enough to make this easily worth the price. It was definitely one of the top films of the year, and it's Oscar nomination was well deserved. The checkout in store was quick and very efficient, and the product was as expected - undamaged, and in perfect working condition. I definitely recommend buying this from Best Buy's stores, to all interested parties.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Tragic, infuriating, accessible... I liked it.

    Posted
    NekoNash
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    "The Big Short" came across as more authentic than other recent similarly-themed films, which seemed intended for implausible entertainment rather than information. Not that there's anything wrong with big budget capers starring A-list actors; I happen to love Leonardo DiCaprio (though not so keen on George Clooney lately). This movie portrayed the events, intrigue and chicanery surrounding a major financial catastrophe, explaining subprime mortgage lending and the related market upheaval very well. With so much focus this year on Wall Street regulation, it was good to see these topics described in an accessible way (a fun Margot Robbie cameo), so that the general public can understand why such scrutiny is being requested, and how important it is to pay attention.

    I would recommend this to a friend



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