The Ingmar Bergman: A Film Trilogy [Criterion Collection] [4 Discs] [DVD]

Part of the Criterion Collection, A Film Trilogy by Ingmar Bergman is a three-disc set of 1960s chamber dramas from Ingmar Bergman. Shot by cinematographer Sven Nykvist, each film is a personal story of spiritual loss in modern life. Includes Through a Glass Darkly (1961), Winter Light (1962), and The Silence (1963). Each film is presented with a high definition full frame transfer in the original black-and-white. The Dolby Digital Mono soundtracks are offered in Swedish with improved English subtitle translation. Optional English dubbed soundtracks are also available. Special features include poster galleries, original theatrical trailers, essays, and video discussions with Bergman biographer Peter Cowie. Besides being a beautifully packaged collector's edition, this set marks the first time these films have been released on DVD in the U.S. Highly recommended for fans of the director's work.
$58.99
Cardmember Offers

Overview

Ratings & Reviews

Overall Customer Rating:
Rating 4 out of 5 stars.
4.0
100% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (1 out of 1)

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital transfers of the trilogy films, with restored image and sound
  • Ingmar Bergman Makes a Movie - five part documentary
  • Exploring the film
  • Essays by film scholars Peter Matthews, Peter Cowie and Leo Braudy and filmmaker Vilgot Sjöman
  • Poster gallery for the films of the trilogy
  • Original U.S. theatrical trailers
  • Optional English-debbed soundtracks
  • New English subtitle translations

Synopsis

Through a Glass Darkly
Ingmar Bergman won his second Best Foreign Film Oscar for the moody family drama Through a Glass Darkly. It is the first of what came to be called his "chamber dramas," which positioned four characters in one place where they could interact like a string quartet. It has also been referred to as the first of his trilogy of faith, followed by Winter Light and The Silence, dealing with issues of God and love. Shot in black-and-white and running only 90 minutes long, the film opens with a quote from the book of Corinthians. Suffering from severe mental illness, Karin (Harriet Andersson) has just been released from a psychiatric hospital. She vacations for a summer on an island with her family to help speed up her recovery, but they can't offer the support that she needs. Her father, David (Gunnar Björnstrand), is a clinical and detached writer; her husband, Martin (Max Von Sydow), is a doctor unable to assist her illness; and her brother, Minus (Lars Passgård), is sexually coming of age and dealing with his own emotional problems. Karin's condition worsens and she thinks a spider is God. It has been argued that the script for Through a Glass Darkly was influenced by Charlotte Perkins Gilman's short story, The Yellow Wallpaper. ~ Andrea LeVasseur, Rovi

Winter Light
The Winter Light is the second in a trilogy of dramas by acclaimed Swedish director Ingmar Bergman that explores religious faith and doubts in a visceral, visual, and provocative manner. The first, Through a Glass Darkly, was an international success and heralded this new phase in the director's career. This compelling drama is set within a three-hour period on a Sunday afternoon in November, and begins when the local pastor, Tomas Ericsson (Gunnar Bjornstrand), is finishing his sermon. As of late, Pastor Ericsson has watched his congregation dwindle to a minimal level. Among the remaining parishioners is Marta (Ingrid Thulin) a plain-looking schoolteacher who has long been in love with the pastor. Meanwhile, fisherman Jonas (Max von Sydow) is anxiety-ridden over the nuclear power of the Communist Chinese, but Pastor Ericsson cannot help him, saddled with some overwhelming spiritual dilemmas of his own. As Ericsson struggles with his demons and faces Marta's unwanted (and to him, repugnant) romantic attentions, some hints of the qualities of God begin to surface. ~ Eleanor Mannikka, Rovi

The Silence
The third entry in Ingmar Bergman's trilogy about faith and redemption (with Through A Glass Darkly and Winter Light) is a stark and enigmatic allegory fueled by subtle performances from Ingrid Thulin and Gunnel Lindblom. Thulin plays Ester, a translator and intellectual, who is traveling back to Sweden on a train with her younger sister Anna (Linblom) and Anna's son Johan (Jorgen Lindstrom). They stop in the town of Timuku and check into an old hotel in a foreign land where the language cannot be understood by the three travelers. Ester, who suffers from a terminal lung disease, is very protective towards Anna; but Anna resents being tied down by her sickly sister, and she leaves the hotel room, picking up a waiter (Birger Malmsten in a nearby café. Returning to the hotel room, Anna tells Ester about her sexual encounter with the waiter, and Ester becomes sexually aroused. Anna leaves for another room in the hotel to continue making love with the waiter. Johan helps Ester track Anna down Anna, and Anna and the waiter proceed to make love a third time. This provokes a violent and biter argument between the two sisters. ~ Paul Brenner, Rovi

Ingmar Bergman Makes a Movie

Cast & Crew

  • Harriet Andersson
    Harriet Andersson - Karin
  • Gunnar Björnstrand
    Gunnar Björnstrand - David, the Father
  • Max von Sydow
    Max von Sydow - Martin, Karin's husband
  • Image coming soon
    Lars Passgård - Fredrik, David's son, known as Minus

Overall Customer Rating

4 out of 54.0
1 Reviews
100%of customers recommend this product.

Most Helpful ReviewsSee all reviews

    Product images, including color, may differ from actual product appearance.