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HP - 2-in-1 12.3" Touch-Screen Chromebook - Intel Core M - 4GB Memory - 32GB eMMC Flash Memory - White-Front_Standard

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Rating 4.6 out of 5 stars with 218 reviews

93%
would recommend to a friend

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  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    My first Chromebook, changed my perspective.

    Posted
    DavidJr
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
    • Top 100 ContributorTop 100 Contributor

    This little thing is surprisingly poppy. I never really had an interest in Chromebooks as I always thought of them as cheap laptops just for browsing the web and email. However, the X2 has really changed my opinion on them and even convinced a co-worker to get one. The X2 is a essentially a decent sized tablet with an attachable keyboard. The keyboard itself is very responsive and the leather like texture is soft and makes it look like some designer style bag. The touchpad is nicely set in the center making it easy to use with either hand and is as responsive as touching the screen. There are no function keys (F1-12) but a whole row of keys assigned specific functions, such as brightness and volume, making it easy for quick adjustments. As far as treating it as a tablet, it easily detaches from the keyboard and instantly recognizes that it is no longer attached showing the on screen keyboard for applications that require it. The screen itself feels very sturdy, however where the front facing speakers are it feels like a slight weak point and tends to scare me when squeezing those edges. There is a fairly large bezel around the screen, ⅝” all the way around. However, this gives plenty of room for a thumb to be holding the tablet without touching the screen. As far as the screen I am truly surprised at the resolution. This screen is sharp, clear and bright. When I first received it I started playing 4K videos on Youtube and could have sworn it was a 4K screen. However, the specs state it is only 2400 x 1600, which is still impressive considering my 17” laptop still only does 1920x1080. The most common use I have had for my Chromebook has been watching videos, from Youtube and Netflix mostly. With the front facing stereo speakers audio is pretty decent, however I mostly use headphones. When attached to the keyboard the hinge keeps the screen at the desired angle and is surprisingly balanced for how far back it can tilt. An active stylus and AAA battery is also included, as well as a tip tool and 3 additional tips. There are two tips that a more pointed, to give a pen type feel, and two that are more rounded, to give a pencil type feel. The tips are more of a personal feel as far as fine tip and broad tip but do not have much more of a difference to them that I noticed. However, using the stylus to draw on the Chromebook felt really satisfying and really inspired me to want to draw more. As many Android applications are supported through the Google Play store you have plenty of drawing options. As for applications, there is the Chrome Web Store and the Google Play store. The Chrome store had most essentials but having been used to Google Play store from my Android devices I felt like it was missing some common applications. However, for the most part many of the applications through the Play store are supported with a few quirks here and there. For instance, some applications responded weird to the on screen keyboard by capitalizing every word I typed while not providing any auto features when I used the keyboard. As for the surprisingly poppy portion, it is really noticable when opening web pages. I use Chrome on my Windows laptop yet it feels faster while using it on the Chromebook. Pages just seem to load faster in general. The same is true for when you open and close the device and the Wi-Fi connection as it is put to sleep to conserve battery but quickly reconnects to the network when opened up or pressing the power button. As for battery life it gets me through the day if actively using it. As for the past 2 weeks I have only briefly used it to check email and light browsing in the afternoon and have yet to charge it again. So, the standby function is doing really well at conserving the battery. I forgot my charger one day that I let it run dead and used my cell phone USB-C charger instead. Though it recognized it as a slow-charger, it managed to get me through the rest of the day. Upon setting the device up for the first time I noticed it used Google Docs online and I thought for sure that meant I could only use it when online. However, once you have logged into your Google account it retains a cache of documents created through Google Docs and you can later access other items once back online if you have not downloaded them to your device. Having been a primarily Windows PC user the Chrome OS was a bit different, however, having used Android based phones for some time now there are plenty of similarities. Using this Chromebook is very much like a blend between the styles of devices. Also, with this Chromebook having an Intel chipset you can enable developer mode and run Linux if you want to try something a little more technical. Once installed, swapping between the two operating systems is seamless. I’d say my only real complaint about this HP Chromebook X2 is the white surface on the back of the screen is making it look like I abuse the poor thing, collecting every little bit of a scuff mark.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    The future of Chrome OS

    Posted
    DoctorHoo
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network

    HP Chromebook X2 12-F014DX The HP Chromebook X2 is the first Chromebook with a detachable keyboard that also runs Android apps enabling it to function both as a Chrome OS laptop and as a high end Android tablet. My initial impression of the hardware was that it felt like a high end device with premium build quality. The tablet itself was made of aluminum and felt solid. The screen was super sharp with rich and vibrant colors. The touchpad was responsive and had a nice click to it. Being new to Chrome OS, I had to learn how it responds to touch gestures using the touchpad. Once I got used to the basics, I was able to use two fingers to scroll around documents, three fingers to move around tabs, and two fingers (instead of one finger) to tap/click the touchpad to bring up the context menu. The touchpad easily and correctly distinguish all my gestures. The keyboard felt good (although the smaller sized layout makes some compromises compared to a full-sized keyboard causing me to type the wrong character more than I would like). The leather-like texture on the keyboard was a nice touch. Setting up was extremely easy. Just connect to my home network and log into my Google account and all my bookmarks and passwords were migrated so my browsing experience was exactly the same as on my Windows desktop. Since Chrome OS boots so much faster than Windows, this makes it the ideal machine to use if you just want to quickly get on the internet to browse around. When I first set it up, it immediately found an update. The update actually took a little longer to finish than what I expected it to take but it was still orders of magnitude faster than updates on a Windows machine. Another update on a later date was even faster. Since I’m new to Chrome OS, I’m still trying to figure things out. I’m using Google Docs to write this review to see if Chrome OS could be viable as a main computer. Instead of Google Docs, we also have the choice of using Microsoft Office 365 as either a Chrome Extension (which is called Office Online) or by using the Android Apps version available on the Google Play Store. It’s a little bit confusing since the HP Chromebook X2 can run both. Which version of a program should we install if there is both a Chromebook and an Android version available? Right now, if there is both a Chromebook and Android version, I will favor installing the Chromebook version. There are two USB-C ports that can be used for data transfer, charging and display (I only tested the charging part) as well as a Micro SD slot that accepted my Sandisk 128 GB card with no problems. I’m not sure how external memory is handled in Chrome OS. Is this memory available for installing more apps? On some of my Android phones, I would run out of memory for installing or updating apps even when I had a large SD memory card installed. Android would not let me install apps on my SD card and would only let me use it to store music or picture files. I don’t know if Chrome OS has the same limitations. With 32GB of internal storage, I probably won’t run out of memory for apps but it would be nice if I knew that external memory is also available for installing applications. The HP Chromebook X2 also comes bundled with HP’s Active Pen that supposedly uses Wacom AES technology. From briefly playing around with the pen, I think it’s good enough for artists who want to use it for drawings or sketching. Android apps start in a smaller window with the option of running in full screen. The Chromebook version of Netflix ran perfectly with great video quality. The Android app version of Amazon Prime Video did not run well and had lots of stuttering. The SiliconDust HDHomerun Android app sometimes had trouble finding my HDHomerun tuner on the network. But when it did find it, it ran great. Sound from the front side speakers was capable of filling the room with clear and crisp sound but felt a little tinny to me. My favorite Android app for the HP Chromebook X2 was Comixology! Comics look absolutely beautiful on that large super sharp screen! With the keyboard detached and running in full tablet mode, the HP Chromebook X2 is a gorgeous comic book reader. It might be a little too large to hold comfortably for long periods but the screen is just gorgeous for reading comic books. Battery life has been excellent. With light use, I was able to get about 5 days of use without needing to charge. The HP Chromebook X2 in laptop mode is perfect for web browsing, email, and other light desktop usage (such as word processing and spreadsheets). It’s also a fantastic media consumption device (Youtube, Netflix and Comixology etc.). With its ability to run Android apps it can also function as a high end Android tablet. I think HP hit a home run with the HP Chromebook X2.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Awesome but late arriving

    Posted
    thebigbadviolist
    • My Best Buy® MemberMember

    I was in the market for a tablet about two years ago and I had never owned an Apple product so I was thinking an android tablet. I was thinking either a Samsung Tab or Asus 3s10 as I needed the tablet to be 3:2 not 16:9 but after reading reviews they both had major problems (mostly not getting updates and/or quality control) that really hurt their value proposition against the iPad. I wouldn't buy a pure android tablet because OEMs (samsung, asus, etc) supply updates, like on phones, to the android software- most companies abandoning the devices after 1-2 years at most. On the X2 (and all chromeOS devices) you get updates directly from google so you have a much better chance of getting updates on this VS a pure android tablet. Anyway, I got a 10.5" 256GB ipad pro open box and on sale for $600; eventually picked up a BT keyboard and pencil for about $100 (used pencil). The x2 wasn't out yet but even at it's $530-600 release price it was not a great deal vs the ipad. Flash forward a little bit and my GF wanted a macbook air replacement so I got her a samsung chromebook pro (Same display as this and Pixelbook) and noticed how awesome that device is- while a little sluggish compared to an iPad (or even the X2) the ability to run full desktop chrome and lack most of the little annoyances of iOS coming from a lifetime of windows and android was intriguing. While the iPad pro is an amazing piece of hardware, iOS is garbage even compared to ChromeOS. My iPad developed a white spot on the screen after a year so I sold it for exactly what I paid for it (Apple products do resell well if you get the timing right) and went in to Bestbuy looking to pick up another ipad on sale when I saw the X2 on sale for $400. At $400 the X2 would have been a no brainer vs the iPad if it had launched at that price with android apps. Any more than that and you have to start asking yourself if you want a device that's slower than most iPads (7th gen core m3 is fast enough, about the same as the A10 in the $250-$330 2018 ipad) with probably more bugs possibly shorter software update lifespan. Chrome: Chrome is pretty awesome and has made some leaps with 72, so much better than iOS; real multitasking instead of pausing programs/tabs when they are not in the foreground like on ipad. This and the pixel slate are the only non-MS tablets that offer a proper desktop environment. I didn't realize how much I missed this until I got the X2. In tablet mode this thing is way better than a MS Surface- you don't go running for the trackpad/keyboard every 30 seconds when you have it in tablet mode, the UI is nice and iPad like. It's very clever how it does "desktop mode" better than an iPad and does "tablet mode" better than a MS Surface- exactly what I wanted really as I don't need this to be a full windows computer but I prefer not to make so many iOS sacrifices. Linux apps can but installed on this device although I have not done so. I paired my phone with Chrome so I get my SMS and instant internet connection on the X2 from my phone when not on wifi, seamless as the apple environment. Android: Running android apps feels like you're in beta program half the time. After recently getting chromeOS 72 some apps can use the SD card; Netflix can, spotify cannot (at least for me- some people say it does, Idk?) My pdf reader works to save/read from SD card. Prime Video app doesn't install on this device at all as of now. On the one hand you can download or stream through the full desktop version of any website in chrome but offline downloads work better in the apps. I expect this to get sorted out but with only 32GB built in this functionality should have been day one or the X2 should have come with 64GB. Build quality: While everything about this device is slightly outdated, it was all premium when it was new and has for the most part held up. If the bezels were a little smaller this thing would look like a 2019 device but it compares more to the years old MS Surface design, the tablet and keyboard feel very similar to the MS Surface minus backlit keys and kickstand. While the tablet does wobble a bit if you poke at it or write on it in laptop mode, it otherwise doesn't feel like a detachable when it's set up like a laptop- which is awesome. the Surface feels weird with the kickstand and same goes for the ipad with keyboard. Even though the keyboard is heavy this is a worthy trade off in my book as it feels right in both tablet and laptop modes. The screen is very sharp and bright. The pen had some lag out of the box but seems to be better- depends on the app. It's not ipad pencil level of accurate but it's more than good enough for writing in my music scores and taking notes if I need to. I barely used the apple pencil when I had it so this wasn't a priority for me. The pen does attach magnetically to the area where the keyboard attaches when you have the tablet separate- some people have complained you can't do this. Placement of buttons a little weird coming from iPad but everything is well thought out and makes sense. Overall an extremely well designed device from a hardware perspective, if not a year or two behind MS and Apple in its release. Performance: Honestly I'm surprised how fast this thing is, doesn't make me miss my iPad at all. It is clearly faster than the Samsung Chromebook pro with the same m3 from the 6th generation (x2 is 7th gen m3) and almost as fast in the chrome browser as my i7-7500u asus laptop although it's definitely choppier than my 10.5" iPad pro was when running other apps or scrolling webpages (mb because 120hz screen on ipad) but usually not worse than the 2018 cheap iPad when comparing the same iOS app vs Android App. Now the X2 is at a big disadvantage as its emulating Android and those apps are optimized for ARM, not the x86 intel m3, so comparable performance to the 2018 cheap ipad is good all things considered. If you have to do all your work in chrome and/or really want to have something other than an iPad this might be it for you. 4GB of ram has been fine in practice even with lots of stuff open. 32GB of internal storage means 17GB free, 64GB should be the min here even on a chromebook as SD hard support is still slow with some apps not to mention add $20 to the cost of the device for an SD card. Google does throw in 100GB cloud storage for 1-2 years depending on the deal running when you get the X2. Battery life is 7-11 hours, great. Overall: Can't go wrong with this is you mainly want a tablet, for a performance chromebook maybe look elsewhere. I do love this thing despite all the little hiccups, it just feels so much less limiting that the iPad and not much slower. I guess the Pixel slate 8th Gen m3 with 8GB ram and more storage would be the sweet spot of performance but you lose the SD card slot and headphone jack and double the price so it makes less sense. Until that one costs around $400-500 I'll stick with the x2 as it's a pleasure to use but there's always those pesky iPads surprisingly offering a good value proposition, who knew apple could do that?

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Time for a change.

    Posted
    Eighty
    • Verified PurchaserVerified Purchase
    • My Best Buy® MemberMember

    Chromebooks have been in the market for a while now, and it was something I’ve been considering since its first product release back in 2011. During that time I’ve had 3 Windows laptops, each priced around $800. I’ve made several conclusions after my experiences with them: I hate gaming on small screens and soon-to-be outdated hardware, I hate leaving them on overnight because of the tidal waves of Windows updates, and I hate how their brick batteries just give up after several years and won’t even hold a 30 minute charge. It’s time for a change. With the current state of Chrome OS and the release of the HP Chromebook X2, they have finally come across something that I’m ready to transition into. I only care about several things now: a flexible device with a good web browser, a good screen for videos and books, and a good battery life. This Chromebook checks all of my boxes. With the specs that's arguably weaker than a high-end smartphone, I thought it wouldn't make the cut… But it does. Reading the news, reading books, writing in Google Docs, browsing pictures, streaming shows, and watching movies are all pretty smooth. It also passed the Hearthstone test; the test being that it runs Hearthstone well. I had all of these apps open at the same time for fun, and I was pleased with how quick it was to launch and switch between them with only a few minor hiccups. In turn, this allows a focus on other things like the display, and my goodness it’s beautiful. At 2400x1600 in 1080p, watching videos in this bright display is just joy to experience. If you’re looking for a Windows or Apple device with a similar screen resolution, be prepared to throw down over $900. I’m also happy with the battery life, which is true to the words of review sites that measured it at 7-8 hours of standard usage. Personally I had 4-5 hours of constant video streaming on near-full brightness. And then there’s the part where you detach the screen from the laptop and converts into a tablet. Honestly, I felt ridiculous holding a 12 inch tablet in my hands that weighed a little over 1.5 lbs. Then I started streaming shows and reading comics and books from the comfort of my couch, and that feeling went away. In spite of this the Chrome OS tablet interface still has a ways to go before it becomes a truly great experience, though it came pretty far since the OS 70 update. I also use it as a pseudo second monitor where my single monitor desktop is at. My desktop’s video card can play recent games at high settings but some of the other hardware is showing its age, so it’s not the best at multitasking. With a tablet stand, I’m happy to use the detached Chromebook as a secondary device to check social media or play videos and podcasts in the background. Of course, the positives comes with several tradeoffs: The speakers are meh. Having them be front facing is always a good design choice but you won’t find a rich bass or range. The ports are sparse. All you’ll have is 2 USB Type-C ports, 1 Micro-SD card slot, and 1 headphone jack. Chrome OS supports many external devices, but this will require a Type-C hub and will bring you down another $20-$60 depending on what you want. However, the USB Type-C ports are intelligently positioned in the lower corners of the screen so you won’t see your cables and hubs dangling in the air. Speaking of Micro-SD, Chrome OS is still not ready to make them completely read/writeable (As of 2/28/19 with this product). You won’t be able to format the card as internal storage like you can already do for a good number of Android phones. Your favorite Android games will have to stay in the already small 32gb of storage for now. You also won’t be able to access the SD card for a number of Android apps, like VLC and MoonReader. The good(ish) news is that you can still watch your local videos on your card using Chrome OS’ native file explorer, provided that it’s in a format that Chrome OS supports. If you’re going that route, then you better get started with converting those .divx and .wmv files. Also, when I purchased this Chromebook it included 100gb of Google Drive cloud storage for 2 years, with an annual fee of $19.99 afterwards. It’s something to seriously consider if you’re in a constant state of migrating your photos, ebooks, documents, and other small files from computer to external hard drive to USB stick and etc. At its suggested retail price for $600, you’ll have to decide what you really care about in a laptop and see if that matches up with what the HP Chromebook X2 offers, but that remains true today for any Chromebook. I got this when it was on sale for $400, and for me that was a no brainer for what it offers.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Excellent ChromeOS laptop and tablet.

    Posted
    optimummind
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
    • Top 10 ContributorTop 10 Contributor

    ======= Summary ======= The HP Chromebook X2 is my first Chrome OS and Chromebook experience and I really like it~! The hardware is sleek and premium, the display is crisp and bright, the keyboard and touchpad are excellent, the tablet mode is really awesome, and the Chrome OS software and apps work flawlessly and fluidly. And the battery life is simply superb~!! I've only used Windows computers since 1994 and it took me only a day or two to quickly adjust to the new software and how it all works. Great product from HP~! ***Pros: 1. Premium build materials and design. 2. Bright and crispy screen. 3. Excellent keyboard and touchpad. 4. Superb battery life. 5. Useful stylus/pen. 6. Easy to use as both a laptop or a tablet. 7. Fast & performant. 8. Easy to maintain and keep the computer updated. 9. Google Play Store app support (i.e., lots and lots of apps available). 10. Relatively light (~3 lbs) and easy to carry around. Only 1.5 lbs if used as a tablet. 11. Expandable storage via microSD card. ***Cons: 1. Chrome Extensions work a bit differently in ChromeOS than in a Windows 10 environment & Chrome browser. 2. Slight learning curve if new to Chrome OS (e.g., keyboard shortcuts, file management, network sharing). 3. The main rear-camera is slow and not very good (compared to mid- and flagship level smartphones). 4. Only 32GB of onboard storage. 5. Some Android apps have compatibility issues. 6. Custom arrangement of apps and folders inside the "App Drawer" is not saved and resets after a shutdown/restart. 7. Touchpad gestures are lacking compared to Microsoft's Precision Touchpad. 8. Difficult to access Windows shared folders across home network. 9. No unattended remote access option. ======= General Design & Build Quality ======= The HP Chromebook X2 is quite a looker. I love its aluminum ceramic white lid design paired up with a leathery textured dark navy keyboard. The metal sideframe feels premium and solid. The touchpad feels nice and it has just the right amount of "clickiness" and pressure response when clicking on it. The keys on the keyboard feel good as well - definitely made of higher-quality plastic with a slight texture to it that I appreciate. This $600 Chromebook X2 feels more premium than many Windows laptops that cost $1000 or more. Compared to my $1,300 HP Spectre 13 Windows 10 laptop, it looks and feels just as premium and high-quality. Complete win from HP~!! Detaching the screen and using the Chromebook X2 as a tablet is very sleek and nice. It only weighs ~1.5 lbs and it feels light and well-balanced. I experienced no awkward handling issues. ======= Screen ======= The 2400x1600 (240 dpi) 12.3" screen is excellent~! It is protected by Corning Gorilla Glass 4 and it gets bright enough to comfortably use even in outdoors. The screen registers finger taps and gestures instantly and accurately. In addition, everything looks very sharp and crispy. Watching movies and music videos is a very nice experience. Wonderful stuff, no complaints. ======= Keyboard ======= I highly enjoy typing on the Chromebook X2. The keys are responsive, has a nice matte finish and some texture to it, and repels dirt and oil very well. I only wish there were some additional keys that I'm used to having on my Windows laptops (e.g., Pg Up, Pg Dn, Fn, Home, End, Prt Sc, and Caps Lock). ======= Touchpad ======= The touchpad is sized just right for me. It's not too small nor too big. It feels very solid and smooth when running my fingers across it and gestures are detected accurately and consistently. The pressure required to register a click is just right as well. The only thing I miss from the touchpad are customization options. I would love it if ChromeOS offered custom gesture creations similar to Microsoft's Precision Touchpad gestures. ======= Performance ======= My Chromebook X2 is equipped with a 7th-generation (Kaby Lake) Intel Core m3-7Y30 CPU (1.00 to 2.60 GHz, 4MB cache, 2 Cores & 4 Threads), 4GB of LPDDR3-1600 RAM, Intel HD Graphics 615, 32GB eMMC internal storage, and Intel 2x2 802.11ac Wifi and Bluetooth. Paired up with ChromeOS (7.1.1 Nougat), the computer is able to handle everything I throw at it - opening up Chrome with 26 tabs, playing music in the background via YouTube, working on documents via Google Docs and Keep, and more. I was very pleasantly surprised by how well it kept up with my more powerful HP Spectre 13 Windows 10 laptop (Intel Core i7 8550U CPU with 4 Cores & 8 Threads, 8GB DDR3 RAM, and 1TB Samsung 960 Evo NVME SSD). I haven't run into a single instance where I felt that the Chromebook X2 is slow or sluggish. I'm highly satisfied. ======= Audio ======= The audio performed to my expectations and satisfaction. The volume doesn't get very loud and the bass, of course, is lacking in such a slim formfactor but I experienced no distortions and properly enjoyed all the music and videos I watched. I think it will be good enough and satisfactory for most people. ======= Software (ChromeOS) ======= This is my first experience with ChromeOS and I was delighted by its performance, clean interface, ease of use, and low learning curve. Everything about it has been easy to use - the initial setup process, updating ChromeOS, and finding and installing apps from the Chrome Web Store and the Google Play Store. Almost all of the Android apps I installed to the Chromebook worked without a hiccup and were resized correctly to my satisfaction. I only have a few things on my wishlist for ChromeOS: (1) Easy connection to Windows shared folders on the home network, (2) A better and more flexible file management system like on Windows & File Explorer, (3) Unattended remote access functionality, (4) A more customizable "Shelf" and "App drawer," and (5) Ability to add custom touchpad gestures. With Google constantly improving ChromeOS and Chromebooks now having access to the Google Play Store and Linux apps, the future is very bright and promising. I only expect the software side of things to get better and better from here on out. ======= My Verdict ======= I'm very happy with the HP Chromebook X2. It's premium in its design and build, it works very well as both a laptop and a light 12" tablet, app support and variety is dynamic and wide-ranging, performance is great, battery life is superb, and Google is constantly improving ChromeOS. HP has created an excellent machine with high value - not for just being a Chromebook but even when compared to Windows laptops that cost a lot more. It's a Slam Dunk from HP~!!

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Expectations Exceeded!

    Posted
    nhtechie
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network

    First off, this is my second Chromebook, however first 2-in-one. Technical Issues? Nope, surprisingly! There were a ton of things that I liked … including: Quick WiFi acquisition -- when opening the clamshell, it got a wifi signal very quickly. Printing - worked fine with my HP 5200 series wireless printer The display comes set to a very low resolution, so I bumped it up to 1500x1000; the max resolution made it impossible for me, with great eyesight, to use it. I listen to a ton of music during the day -- let’s say 10hours/day. I found there to be seamless audio casting with Google Play Music to any Google device in the house. Also, it connects to a Bose Soundlink Mini via Bluetooth without issue as well. Another very good feature is that there is NOT a proprietary connector to charge it … it uses a USB-C Charger, but requires so much juice to charge, that normal fast-chargers won’t touch it. At least you can use THAT charger to charge your phone, etc. Oh, and it has 2x USB-C ports, so you can still hook up a flash drive if needed. Let’s not forget about the microSD card slot for additional storage as well, though at 32GB on this unit & everything going to the cloud -- I didn’t find myself struggling for free space. There is a solid feeling keyboard. It’s a good size given the tablet portion and the trackpad is perfectly centered - so it’s easy movement between typing & moving the cursor. The magnets are strong and takes a good tug to disconnect it from the keyboard, which doesn’t have a power source itself, thus doesn’t need to be charged in addition to the tablet. The camera is decent, however I didn’t find myself bringing it outside to use so I can’t compare it to my S8+ in regards to quality (and I didn’t research the specs on this camera either, FWIW). Something that REALLY shocked me was how minima the fingerprints were … not like the iPads of yesteryear. Lastly, a pen is new to me, and until I get a real need for it, is somewhat in the way, so I keep it attached to my old 13in MacBook Pro’s Incase pouch. With the Pros, there are almost always some cons. This device has a lot less than I had expected, so here we go … The front-facing speakers (like the Nexus 9) are good but not great; when I see something purposely marked B&O (Bang & Olufsen), I expect more than some tinny output. The screen is a bit wobbly when taking photos while docked to the keyboard, mainly because the display is a HEAVY ‘tablet’ piece. When I was doing some basic video recording on the rear facing camera I definitely had low-light focusing issues. Can’t [easily] rename the device -- which can be annoying for those with naming conventions Apps: Not all are major Android Apps are ready for ChromeOS - it seems like they want to get away from “Apps” and move to Cloud-driven, so -- GMAIL isn’t an App by default, it directs you to Chrome & the gmail web page. Here are some Apps that I came across that just don’t work: Netflix (but the website works fine) Blink Camera Fing So, to sum it up there is plenty of horsepower for the type of use that I’m giving it and I’m a power user in all aspects of technology.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Excellent Chromebook and "real" tablet in one!

    Posted
    BobinVA
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network

    The promise of the new HP X2 Chromebook is great: a single device that is at the same time a really good laptop and a really good tablet. After being curious for a long time, I got my first Chromebook last year, the Acer 15, and really liked it, but was always attracted to Chromebooks with a different form factor, like the 2-in-1s from Asus and Samsung. When I heard about the new X2 Chromebook from HP, I wondered if this could be the one I’ve been waiting for, so I decided to find out. The first thing I noticed when opening the box was that the X2 feels solid. Everything about it shouts quality. Just like other Chromebooks, getting it set up and ready to use is a breeze. Once you’re connected to the internet, all your apps and settings are automatically downloaded. This is one of the great things about Chromebooks! The first thing I wanted to experience was the keyboard and trackpad. These are your interface with the machine, so they can make or break the experience. I’m happy to report that the keyboard is a pleasure to type on, and the trackpad is excellent! There is a good amount of key travel, and even though it’s the same size as the Chromebook Pro, the keys are spaced better and it doesn’t feel as cramped. The surface of the keyboard is covered in a material that’s made to look and feel like leather, and it’s really nice. It feels great and makes typing more comfortable. And no, it's not backlit. Unless you absolutely need this, I don't think it's a deal breaker. Another crucial component is the screen. The X2 uses the same panel as the one in the Google Pixelbook, and it’s beautiful. It’s plenty bright, and you’ll be shocked at the resolution when you crank it all the way up. In fact, it makes things too small to see. This is an excellent screen. Along the edges of the screen, HP has hidden the speakers. This is great because they fire toward you, which makes them sound so much better. I was impressed with the sound level and quality, and I think these are probably better than those I’ve heard on other Chromebooks. HP includes an active stylus with the X2, and the keyboard features a pen loop to hold it. That is a nice touch, since you have to pay extra for the stylus for the Pixelbook or iPad. That also made me think that HP wants to change the way we think about Chromebooks. Obviously, they’re pushing toward more tablet functionality (I’ll get to that in a bit), and part of that is the use of a stylus. The gold standard in that area is the Apple Pencil. This is one of those things that Apple really got right—it just works! I was hoping for something similar here, if not exactly up to the same standard. HP includes a drawing program that shows off the capabilities of the stylus, but I was more interested in handwriting. Here’s where I was disappointed. Most apps, including MS OneNote, suffer from terrible lag, making the stylus almost unusable. Finally, I found Squid, which deftly supports the HP stylus and provides a top-notch handwriting experience. I don’t know if this issue is the fault of the apps, Chrome OS or HP, but it’s pretty disappointing to find support for the active stylus only partway there. Perhaps we’ll see this improve as Chrome OS improves, but right now I see this as a partial miss. Overall, the Samsung S pen works better in the apps that aren’t yet optimized for styli. I hope this will be an area of great improvement in the days ahead. The thing that really sets this Chromebook apart is the fact that it's a detachable. If you just want a regular laptop-style Chromebook, you probably won't like the hinge on this one that protrudes a bit out the back. That hinge is what allows this Chromebook to truly be on your lap if you want, but also allows you to detach the screen and use it as a tablet. The hinge is strong enough to hold the screen at the correct angle. When you're ready to use it as a tablet, just pull it off the keyboard. It's held by a magnet and guided by plastic tabs on each side of the screen. Without the keyboard, the tablet is only 1.6 pounds, which makes it light enough to hold and use for extended periods. HP has thoughtfully put the buttons and ports in the right places so as not to get in your way when using it as a tablet. Should you buy the X2? I think that depends on how you plan to use it. If you like the idea of having a tablet without adding another device, I think you'll love this one. The fast processor, great build quality and excellent keyboard/trackpad all work together to make this one of the best Chromebooks available today. Even if you're not going to use it as a tablet a lot, this configuration gives you a lot of freedom to use it the way you want. We'll see if the stylus support improves as ChromeOS improves. As for the finish on this Chromebook, I think it looks great, but the ceramic white on the back of the screen seems like it's going to show scuffs too easily. This is a premium Chromebook that is a joy to use. If having a detachable tablet appeals to you, you can't really go wrong with this one!

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    It has become my daily driver!

    Posted
    DrWMJ
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network

    I have the feeling this computer was designed for me. I am a fan of the Surface Pro, as my use of a computer consists of writing, research, note-taking, and some photography. I was intrigued by Chrome OS, in that it is “stripped down” to be able to function well with low-end processors. So this review will review my experience with the HP Chromebook x2, but will also be a “smack down” between that device and the Surface Pro. The HP Chromebook x2 sells for $600, including the pen and keyboard. The lowest end Surface Pro similarly equipped would cost $1000. So clearly the HP wins on price. Build quality of both devices is excellent. The HP in particular is a well-made, premium device that feels solid and substantial. That said, at 3 lbs. overall, it is a bit hefty. Tablet alone is only 1 ½ pounds, however- similar weight to the original iPad… Detaching and re-attaching the HP tablet to the keyboard takes some practice. The Surface does a much better job with this. On the other hand, when the tablet is “flipped around”, the “presentation mode” on the x2 allows the keys to stay out of contact with the table top or lap. The HP Keyboard if full sized, and a true pleasure to type on. In fact, I think it is better than the Surface Pro keyboard, and just about as good as my HP Spectre X360 15 inch. There is very comfortable key action. Palm rejection on the touch pad is outstanding; better than I have seen on most laptops! Of course, the HP keyboard is not backlit at this time. Speaking of wobble: I don’t see any wobble while typing, but then again, I don’t bang on the keys the way some people do… Wobble is not an issue (for me)! It is easy to use the HP on the lap. Better than the Surface. I like being able to charge on either side due to dual type C USB’s. Charging is done in a short period of time as well. The charger cord is long enough that an extension is not necessary. There is no fan, so the only sound one hears during normal use is the soft “putt-putt” of the keys on the keyboard. There is no “drum effect” that one gets on the keyboard of the Surface Pro, where finger strokes are amplified through the board. Back of the tablet does get very warm with extensive use. Not uncomfortable to hold, but clearly noticeable. Track pad is good, but not great like the Spectre’s. Still, better than the Surface, and no problems in day to day use. Love the 3:2 aspect ratio, as well as 400 Nits brightness. Clarity and brightness are excellent; this is the same display as the Pixelbook and the Samsung Chromebook Pro. No problem linking to Bluetooth speakers and Microsoft Arc Touch mouse. Speakers are good for a laptop. Webcam and rear cameras are functional, but produce dark, miserable pictures. The cameras on this device are no means a strength. Performance-wise, the HP runs through websites and documents just as fast as the Surface. I see no performance advantage to the Surface Pro during routine activities. Issues about inking and note taking: I was hoping that this device would be the “holy grail” of thin, light device with capacity for note taking during classes and meetings. The primary note taking applications include OneNote Online, OneNote Android/mobile, Squid, and Google Keep. (As far as I can tell, Evernote does not support inking in its mobile version.) - OneNote is my favorite while using a PC, but on the Chromebook X2, there is a very prolonged latency with inking in the OneNote Android App. It is still functional, but I would go crazy if I had to deal with this all day in a classroom - There is less than stellar inking in the Online OneNote application; this application can not serve as a note-taking tool. - Even Squid is a bit wonky: occasionally it will lose part of a word after being written, or will hesitate a second before registering. This app also does not have the organizational strengths of OneNote - Google Keep notes are not a good solution; limited length, no clear organizational system. However, the inking experience with Google Keep is the best- no latency at all, excellent pressure sensitivity, and no loss of notes. - I would hesitate to recommend this device for college notes at this time, unless one has a great deal of tolerance for pen latency. The Surface Pro will do substantially better, and more reliably A few notes about Chrome OS: - This computer will run Android apps from the Play Store, including all of the Office Suite and the Bing mobile app. Firefox will run, but Edge mobile crashes. - Multitasking is easy; there are keys to hide/reveal the Chrome toolbar and Bottom Taskbar. - Using the computer as a tablet reminds me of Windows 10 in tablet form. That is, it is feasible, but takes some patience and practice to become facile Overall, I am having a great deal of fun with my HP Chromebook x2. Typing is unexpectedly pleasant, and I have the feeling I am working with a high quality product.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    The Right Stuff

    Posted
    vrs99
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
    • Top 500 ContributorTop 500 Contributor

    Have never had interest in Chromebooks, they were limited in functionality in my world. That changed in a big way when I got my hands on the HP Chromebook X2. It packs a punch and offers the functionality that works in my world from silky smooth web browsing to office functions and beyond. When I say silky smooth that is an excellent description of the speed and response time in the Chrome browser. To my surprise it smokes my home built “beast” desktop in web browsing, the desktop beast has tested out faster than 99 percent of the world’s computers. Yikes, the Chromebook has come a long way. First impression when I saw the HP X2 as we took it out of the box was the stunning design. The pearl white lid is brilliant. That goes along way as I plan to set the unit up for my wife, she loves the look. Couple kudos in my back pocket when she realizes the X2 is hers. After working on the laptop, the last two days setting it up must confess a little jealously that I will not be using the computer. It is fast, everything I have thrown at it from office products, browsing difficult web-pages that typically load slowly, to crunching numbers have not fazed this little brute in any way. It smoothly sails threw all the operations I have thrown at it, I am amazed. Setting up the HP X2 is almost effortless. It is well prepared and executed through all the steps. Surprised at how similar the Chrome GUI interface they have delivered is to the Windows GUI, feels right at home immediately. Screen has an excellent picture, solid colors. Movies look superb. Rely heavily on Office 365 for business as well as home tasks, all the apps are available on Google Play Store and hooked up with our Office 365 account effortlessly. Installed OneDrive to complete the hooks into our Microsoft ecosystem, so far works like a charm. If you plan on using your “old” USB stuff, well that has become so yesteryear, you will need to step up to USB 3.0 type C power connectors. Kudos. If you want to use a mouse I would suggest going Bluetooth, which was my first thought as I have never liked the touch pad mouse thingy. Now that I have used this computer I find the touch pad quite nice, highly accurate and with the touch screen and the stylus I could see myself hanging the mouse up, maybe. CPU, Memory and storage are fast, that is always a big plus. Storage is 32GB which appears to leave you with about 20.5GB for storing your stuff. After loading several of the Microsoft Office Apps and other base programs I am now at 17GB of free space. The storage may seem tight and will be for some but is simply resolved by adding MicroSD memory in the speed and size you desire. Battery life is very strong. Topped off the charge yesterday and the machine has been in use and running for many hours the last two days and I am left with a 60% charge. Like that. Wi-Fi is top notch supporting two band connectivity. My wish is that the keyboard was backlighted, for me it is tough as I use my laptop on the coffee table at night watching the tube. The Oxford Blue on the interior of the unit does not help seeing the keys in dim light. On the other hand, my wife who will be using the HP X2 never uses her backlighted keyboard. Bottom-line, I love this little laptop and it delivers a nice blend of performance, quality build and hits all the right notes for a highly productive computing device. Have now become a convert and admire the Chromebook tech.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    HP Chromebook X2. Detachable Keyboard Makes a Diff

    Posted
    MarkusKong
    • Tech Insider NetworkTech Insider Network
    • Top 50 ContributorTop 50 Contributor

    HP 2-in-1 12.3" Touch-Screen Chromebook (X2 12-F014DX) Setup/Testing/Conclusion The HP Chromebook X2 12-F014DX was designed to be an all in one solution for your everyday tasks and needs. With the ability to remove the keyboard completely instead of the traditional fold back design, you are able to use the HP Chromebook X2 as a tablet instead of just a laptop. The HP Chromebook X2 12-F014DX is the first of it’s kind to run Chrome OS. From personal experience, being able to remove the keyboard completely and not just fold it back makes a huge difference in the “feel” of the device itself. I own a Google Pixelbook and although I love the Pixelbook, when you fold back the keyboard to use it as a tablet, the feel is weird as you’ll push keys even though the keys are essentially non functioning. Powered by an Intel Core M3-7Y30 Processor, you’ll be able to enjoy pretty powerful performance for everyday tasks while being power efficient and running minimal heat. The Intel Core M3-7Y30 is a dual core processor with a very low TDP which is 4.5W. The speed of the M3-7Y30 is clocked at 1.0GHz with a turbo frequency of 2.60GHz. The M3-7Y30 also has Hyper-Threading Technology and 4MB of level 3 cache. Some of you may be put off by the “Intel Core M3”. But let me reassure you, you’re getting a pretty powerful chip. This chip was used in the base 2017 Surface Pro. The Core M3 processor is almost identical to the i5 that is in the Pixelbook. The HP Chromebook X2 12-F014DX comes with 4GB of LPDDR3 memory clocked at 1600 along (NOT user accessible) with a very small storage of only 32GB, but it’s expandable to 256GB through the MicroSD card slot. So what this all means is that… You get a fanless, power efficient, and everyday performance tablet/laptop with the HP Chromebook X2 12-F014DX. What attracts me the most with the HP Chromebook X2 is the design (build quality) and the high-resolution display. I love the exterior premium look where it’s a ceramic white finished by aluminum. The keyboard itself feels as good as it looks as it’s a leather like material finished by it’s stunning oxford blue color. Although the display is small with a diagonal size of 12.3”, it’s impressive 2K resolution (2400 x 1600) makes up for it. The glass is also Corning Gorilla Glass 4 so it’s durable and scratch resistant. My only gripes/complaints here is that when I initially looked up the specs of the HP Chromebook X2, the keyboard was advertised as backlit. Unfortunately, the keyboard is not backlit which I feel like it should be standard nowadays. The other is the limited 32GB storage and no other higher spec’d models available for purchase. In conclusion, I personally like the HP Chromebook X2. I can safely say I have officially made it my daily goto for all my personal needs. It covers everything from work to entertainment. The battery lasts me the day and the speakers project some pretty decent “loudness” when watching things on YouTube or Netflix. I really like being able to remove the keyboard and use it as a tablet. All my games that I played worked without any issues. In addition, HP also includes their Active Pen which is really nice. I got to personally mess with it and do some doodling and it was accurate (light/hard pressure). As mentioned above, the only things I wished that were different was the backlit keyboard and bigger storage. I guess the good thing is you can just get a MicroSD card and do that but I wished HP included a bit more storage from the beginning. As for the backlit keyboard, not much you can do there… In addition, if you’re planning to get “wowed” by the camera, I wouldn’t hold your breath. It’s nice that the HP Chromebook X2 comes with a camera, but it isn’t any spectacular. Anyways, go and check out the HP Chromebook X2 at your local BestBuy and see for yourself. Even with my gripe(s), I still would recommend the HP Chromebook X2. Specs Chrome O.S. Intel Core M3-7Y30 Processor (Intel HD Graphics 615) 4GB LPDDR3 - 1600 SDRAM 32GB eMMC 12.3” Diagonal 2K IPS WLED-Backlit Touchscreen (2400 x 1600) B&O PLAY with Dual Speakers Intel 802.11 b/g/n/ac (2x2) Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.2 Combo HP Wide Vision 5MP Camera (Front Facing) 13MP HP Camera (Rear Facing) What's in the box? HP X2 12-F014DX Full-size Island Style Keyboard HP Active Pen 45W AC Adapter User Manuals/Documents

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    1st of upcoming Chromebook tablets

    Posted
    asiriusbee
    • My Best Buy® Elite Plus MemberElite Plus Member

    So if you Google "Chromebook tablets," you'll see that HP is one of the first manufacturers to produce a Chromebook tablet for consumers. (The Acer Chromebook Tab 10 is being targeted towards the education market for now). On to my 5-day review of this tablet! My first impressions are that I love the battery life. Depending on what you are doing, you can get over 10 hrs. The keyboard is okay, but it is NOT backlit which is disappointing. I've always been a big fan of the Logitech, Lenovo, Samsung and Mac keyboards best. This one is good - has enough travel space and doesn't feel "tacky." The screen is bright enough at 2K IPS WLED-backlit. For most of us, this is just fine. Bluetooth sharing is a challenge with my LG 30. Still working on that. 32gb of storage isn't much - by a long shot - but you have the option of loading a micro sd card and that's exactly what I did. It's fanless and I don't feel it overheating or getting too hot. You can feel some "warmth" at the bottom left side. It feels more "lukewarm" than anything - nothing to freak out over. I don't think you should compare this to other Chromebooks; the Google Pixel is more comparable to a laptop, with it's backlit keyboard and glass trackpad. This HP Chromebook x2, is great for those of us who want to use Android apps, check our email, Facebook and Twitter accounts, but also do some LIGHT work on Word, Excel or Powerpoint. The key word is LIGHTLY, but the processor is NOT going to slow you down. Some people see "m3-7Y30" and they freak out! I currently have 10 tabs open in Chrome with no problems. Spend $150 more on a Google Pixelbook if you need to do heavy duty work; you supposedly have the option of downloading and installing an early version of Google Fuchsia, installing Linux, not to mention the fact that Google is working on AltOS. If you need all of that, I suppose a Pixelbook might be your best bet. Bottom line: if you enjoy the "tablet" form factor of ChromeOS, get this one - you won't be disappointed. It comes with an active pen, so you don't have to worry about the extra cost of buying one separately. You can do some sketching and journaling and the tablet portion of this Chromebook is very light. You can always trade-up later on this year if Samsung, ASUS or Lenovo decide to follow HP in creating Chomebook detachable tablets.

    I would recommend this to a friend