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Customer reviews

Rating 4.7 out of 5 stars with 159 reviews

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    Rating 4.7 out of 5 stars

  • Quality

    Rating 4.8 out of 5 stars

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    Rating 4.6 out of 5 stars

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93%would recommend to a friend

Rating 4.3 out of 5 stars with 8 reviews

The vast majority of our reviews come from verified purchases. Reviews from customers may include My Best Buy members, employees, and Tech Insider Network members (as tagged). Select reviewers may receive discounted products, promotional considerations or entries into drawings for honest, helpful reviews.
Page 1 Showing 1-20 of 159 reviews
  • Cons mentioned:
    Charging, Overheating

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Versatile for Photo & Video!!

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    Posted . Owned for 3 months when reviewed.
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    I got this camera for photography and vlogging!! I love it so much!! It can overheat when filming 4K for around longer than 20 minutes, but maybe that's especially because I live in south Texas. The onboard mic picks up noise, but it is sufficient for vlogging if you speak clearly. The kit lens is amazing for this low price. I recommend leaving Vibration Reduction from the lens ON, but electronic vibration reduction is turned off on my camera because it looks odd. The camera does not have built in VR, but the lens it comes with does. I have my picture profile settings set to standard and not auto. Picture profile settings are different than your camera's exposure settings. Get a fast SD card. I recommend a 256GB high speed Sandisk. Doesn't have to be the fastest, but get a good one. I charge this camera using the Apple 20W wall charger paired with the Apple USB to USB charging wire. The camera's battery charges inside the camera, which i think is great! However the included USB A to USB C charging wire is insufficient and does not come with a wall adapter. This camera is a 10 out of 10 and for me beats anything at it's price range! Flippy screen is convenient and video quality is excellent. A game changer for me!

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Autofocus, Video quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Great camera for photography, too!

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    Posted . Owned for 2 weeks when reviewed.
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    I'm going to preface this by saying I'm reviewing this camera as one for photography, not videography as almost every review only talks about the video capabilities and not the photo capabilities. I am a beginner photographer, so I don't have much experience but I will give the most accurate review I can. What I like: 1. Autofocus. The autofocus is snappy, accurate, the eye tracking works well, very little focus hunting/breathing and a good depth of field with the kit lens. 2. UI, as someone new to cameras the UI was very intuitive and did not take that much getting used to which I appreciate. 3. Size and weight, this this is seriously small and light and very easy to carry around. Carried it around the city for a few hours using the neck strap and was very comfortable the whole time. 4. Picture quality, obviously its a camera and takes good pictures with very good color accuracy, sharpness, dynamic range, and depth of field. Much better than a smartphone camera in most instances, good in low light, good stabilization allowing slower shutter speeds to be used as well. 5. The screen, since there is no EVF you're gonna be using the screen the whole time. It's a good size, sharp, clear, color accurate, and can get very bright (10 different brightness levels.) Did not have any issues at night or in direct sunlight at the default brightness, thought you can change it to your liking. It's also touchscreen, which works very well and you can use it to autofocus or even take photos which is very convenient. Flips out with a good range of motion, too, for those hard to take shots. 6. Video/mic quality, I took a few test videos and autofocus in auto mode worked very well always keeping me in frame and properly exposed. Built in mic sounds very clear and very crisp. 7. USB-C charging, plug this into any usb-c PD charger and you're good to go. I have a MacBook and use the same charger for both which is especially convenient. Also supports data over USB-C for offloading files, and I believe the cable that comes with it (C-A) will support data transfer, however I use an SD card reader which also works just fine 8. Very nice tactile buttons and scroll wheels, changing aperture and shutter speed have their own wheels and ISO is changed by pressing a button and moving the shutter speed control wheel, which is very nice and convenient for fast shooting. What I don't like 1. No EVF, which as a new photographer I haven't used in the past and I also wear glasses which makes it harder to use however having the option is always nice. I've only missed it twice, where the sun hit the screen at such an angle that the shot was very hard to see. 2. The RAW codec used is not compatible in the native Finder app on my Mac (2020, M1) as of the time of this review (8/21/22) which means you can't preview RAW photos. The only way to view them is using a 3rd party app (Nikon's NX Studio works fine) and viewing them there or exporting them as JPEG from that same app. I think this can be fixed in the future but for now I will be shooting in JPEG. 3. No battery percent? This is a nitpick but not having battery percent and only having the three bars is very imprecise and annoying as I never know exactly how much charge I have. I really hope this is fixed with software but not holding my breath. 4. Another nitpick, but it can be mildly frustrating not being able to take photos without manually extending the lens first. Because it can fold down so small and flush, I don't mind too much but would be nice if it was automatic. And that's about it! For a first camera, I am very happy with it and it performs very well. I have camera samples attached and it takes some great pictures. I bought the Nikon Z 50-250 f4-6.3 lens to use for telephoto and that one works like a dream with this camera, nice and sharp and able to maintain sharpness even when cropping thanks to the 20mp sensor. TL;DR If not having a viewfinder doesn't bother you and you're looking for a good low-middle end camera don't discount this one just because it's more made for video. It takes fantastic photos and is easy, comfortable, and fun to use!

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Video quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    A Stellar performer for a low priced cameras

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    Posted . Owned for 1 month when reviewed.
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    This camera stands out as a versatile, user-friendly camera that doesn't compromise on quality. If you're a beginner or a seasoned photographer, this camera adapts to your needs, delivering stunning results across various photography styles. It's a solid investment for anyone looking to capture the world through a lens of superior quality.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Great Value

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    Posted . Owned for 1 month when reviewed.
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    Great little mirrorless camera. Got it mainly for Vlogging and my AZ4Runner youtube channel, but this little camera does so much more. I was already vested with nikon so the layout and feel is the same as my other D series cameras.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Cons mentioned:
    Battery life

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Camera

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    Posted . Owned for 3 weeks when reviewed.
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    I used this camera for a vacation video and it was awesome! The quality is so nice and I would 100% buy again if I needed to. The battery life isn’t the longest but can last for around 4 hours which was enough for when the exciting things were happening!

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Great buy

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    Posted . Owned for 5 months when reviewed.
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    Great cam. This is my first cam. I used it for fun, street photography and guitar covers.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Like the camera and lenses!

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    Posted . Owned for 3 weeks when reviewed.
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    Light weight camera! I also got the telescope lense and default lense. Love this camera so far.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Video quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Great lightweight, portable camera

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    Posted . Owned for less than 1 week when reviewed.
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    Bought this camera as a travel camera and backup to my Z6II when I don't want to carry it around. Paired it with the FTZ adapter so I could use my other Nikon DX lenses. The photo and video quality is outstanding. I don't use it for streaming or recording long videos, so I can't speak to the issues others may be having with recording time (though the max record times are clearly stated in the manual). Highly recommend as a lightweight camera to carry around with you when you don't want to carry something heavier, or as a backup to an existing Nikon Z camera setup.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Video quality

    Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    Welcome to the family Z-30

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    Posted . Owned for 1 week when reviewed.
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    Cool camera. Been capturing some quality images and learning what this camera is capable of. It has tons of options on the menu and I'll be learning allot about how digital cameras work. If you want to get macro shots your gonna need a dedicated lense like the Laowa 65mm which mounts great on this Nikon z30. Looking forward to all the experiences this camera will call me on.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Autofocus, Touch screen, Video quality
    Cons mentioned:
    Overheating
    Tech Insider Network Member

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Simple and versatile

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    Tech Insider Network Member
    Posted .
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    Pros Has tally light Lens stores compact Light for feature set Has camera control app Designed to work as a webcam Good grip for secure hold Has photo and video modes Easy to use by just leaving on auto Allows you to learn features on your time Screen flips to show from front Allows saving custom profiles Has both touch and conventional controls Creates shallow depth of field naturally Low light photos are very low in noise Large selection of lenses with adapters Integrated stereo mics with noise reduction Can record video for over 2 hours Cons Short battery life No headphone audio jack Limited number of native lenses No viewfinder for conventional shooting Autofocus noises sometimes recorded video Can only record around 30 minutes of 4K before thermal shutdown Design and Features The Z30 is Nikon’s latest offering targeting vloggers looking to transition to the next step beyond smartphone and webcam video. For starters, there is no viewfinder. This task is handled by the integrated touchscreen. The touchscreen can be viewed from the back of the camera or flipped around and viewed from the front. It can also be flipped to face the camera to store the screen and protect it from damage. With the touchscreen, you have the option to control and configure the camera via touch or conventional buttons. While most buttons are like other cameras there are some notable differences. Since the Z30 was intended to be both a still and video camera it has two separate “shutter” buttons. The main one up front on the top of the grip is set by default to take still photos and them behind that is a smaller button which activates video. Just above the screen is a toggle switch that changes the camera from photo to video mode. This changes the presets for what is displayed on screen and how buttons operate, including the mode dial up top. The mode dial has the standard options such as Auto, Program, Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, and Manual modes but then adds three more options labeled U1, U2, and U3 which store your own custom settings. On top are stereo mics which offer some built in wind cancellation. A windsock is available as an option to further reduce wind noise. External connections include an HMDI port, USB-C port, and Mic port. The mic port can be used to add a shotgun mic for further noise cancellation but unfortunately there is no headphone jack to monitor the audio. The USB-C port is used for charging but also has video capability. The battery bay also houses the SD card slot and has a special access door to install a dummy battery while keeping the main door closed. This is handy if you choose the route of connecting via HDMI and a capture card as you don’t have to have the battery door hanging open. Usage and Performance Nikon seems to have put a fair bit of effort into making the Z30 a bridge device for those who want to upgrade from phone or webcam video to something more but aren’t ready for the complexities of higher end DSLRs. The removal of the viewfinder and addition of the touchscreen allows those more comfortable with touchscreens to feel at home. Auto modes are quite good to get started. You won’t utilize the camera to the fullest, but over time you can learn how to adjust more settings and further dial in the camera to your preferences. To help you learn the functions the Z30 has built in explanations for different features. There is a button to the right of the screen with a question mark. You can press that to get an explanation of what a particular setting changes. If you want to use the Z30 as a streaming camera you have a simple option that doesn’t even require extra hardware like a capture card. You just install Nikon Webcam utility and plug the camera in via USB-C. You just need to change USB-C power delivery option and that’s it. The camera will show us just like any other webcam. If you want more control, you can get a dummy battery and use the HDMI port and connect it to a capture card. The HDMI output is clean so no worries about camera settings overlaying on your video. By default, the focus mode is auto area people. The camera determines the area that it thinks you want in focus and looks for people in that area to focus on. This is helpful but it does mean if you want to show something you must block your face or change the focus mode to something other than people. It would have been nice to see Nikon offer a mode where it focusses on people unless something is in the foreground and then focuses on that. Beyond streaming, the Z30 is a capable shooter with the included kit lens. The lens collapses into a storage position making the overall package smaller and easier to carry. The included lens does best for macro, portraits, and vlogging. If you are vlogging solo and have shorter arms you may find the included lens harder to get that super blurry backgrounds without your face filling the whole frame. In any other situation it’s very easy to get the natural bokeh. If you can’t afford a shotgun mic the integrated stereo mics do a respectable job of picking up speech. There is a software-based wind noise filter which does a decent job until you can afford to upgrade or if you need to stay more low profile. If you want to see your audio levels, you will want to turn off self-portrait mode as the audio levels will go away the moment you flip the screen around with the mode enabled. Autofocus eye tracking comes in handy for both photos and videos. From a distance it will focus on what it recognizes as a person or animal, depending on what you set. As the person or animal gets close enough it will put a box over the eye it has found. You can also choose which eye to track for focus. If you move out of the frame for a second and come back it will find the same eye and lock the focus again. Video resolution maxes out at 4K 30 fps which at first might seem like nothing big but unlike smartphone video which looks good but has contrast and sharpness set very high to hide the limitations the Z30 doesn’t need to do this. The large sensor on Z30 means you get a naturally sharp image and accurate colors that is hard to describe but easy to see next to smartphone photos or videos. Where this really comes in handy is in low light. Pictures and videos stay naturally sharp and clear with very little noise even in low light. Combine this with a blurry background that isn’t generated by software but naturally by the lens and you get video and pictures that look more professional. One small caveat is cameras at this level still can’t handle recording 4K video for long periods without overheating. If you have a way to provide power, the Z30 can record video for over 2 hours at 1080P. Switch that to 4K and the camera will start to thermal shutdown somewhere just past 30 minutes depending on conditions. In most cases 30 minutes should be enough but it is worth noting. If you are using the Z30 as a streaming camera there is no specific time limit. With no recording being done on camera it stays much cooler and should run for hours on a stream assuming you have no other heat issues near it. However, there have been some reports of thermal shutdown when streaming via USB-C so for extended streams it might still need the traditional dummy battery and capture card. If you do longer streams and are concerned it might be good to wait for the community to do more testing. Final Thoughts There is so much more that could be covered about the Z30. Minor quirks notwithstanding, Nikon has created a very capable camera for streamers looking to up the quality of their content without jumping into the high-end equipment. If you are a vlogger, streamer, photographer, or even hobbyist looking for a way to start working their way into DSLR cameras the Nikon Z30 is a solid contender. The combination of features to help you transition to professional equipment and versatility, the Z30 is a compelling bridge camera to start you on your way to better photo and videography.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Video quality

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Love love love

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    Posted . Owned for 2 weeks when reviewed.
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    Absolutely love this camera . Highly recommend has super clear pictures

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Video quality

    Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    Nikon z 30

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    Posted . Owned for 1 week when reviewed.
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    The screen quality displaying the image could be crisper but overall the pictures look amazing especially for the price.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Autofocus, Touch screen, Video quality
    Tech Insider Network Member

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Excellent mirrorless camera incompact form factor

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    Tech Insider Network Member
    Posted .
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    I am an amateur photographer who uses photography for work, outdoor activities, and vacation pictures. I have owned a DSLR camera from a different brand since 2018 and still use it to serve my need. However, this Nikon Z 30 mirrorless camera offers advanced features and easy utilization of much-needed features that are considered essential these days. Design: I like how Nikon designed it to be high-quality and lightweight; even when mounted on the tripod stand, it was comfortable to handhold. The 16-50mm lens is interchangeable, so more lenses can be used on this camera. The 3-inch touchscreen display is intuitive and well-designed. It is fully articulated and rotates to take selfies since the screen provides all the functions. It offers all the settings and functions that are handy at my fingertips. Physical buttons are well-placed and accessible with no issues. Except in selfie mode, Personally, I found that the touch screen worked best for taking photos after I enabled the autofocus /shutter, so I simply touched the screen to take a photo. This is well-thought-out. There is no viewfinder, and I think it is in favor of the compact design and affordable mirrorless camera. Recording a video enables a red lamp to light up, indicating the video mode is being operated. No SD card, which I expected considering the price, I purchased a Samsung Pro Plus Full-Size SDXC Card 256GB and inserted it into the camera, which is compatible with the camera specs, and went to setting to format, and the memory card was ready to use. After the battery was fully charged, I strapped the camera around my neck, turned the camera dial to Auto mode and autofocus was on, and started shooting photos. Autofocus can be changed to choose people/animals, people only or animals, etc. The autofocus uses eye tracking to track the face/ object and keeps it in the frame. This feature worked flawlessly, and I was amazed by the quality and excellent details of the photos, although I did not touch the photo and video settings. Later on the touch screen, I made a few changes to the picture settings by enabling fine images instead of normal and changing the video resolution to 4K at 30p, pictures were way better. Slow motion is enabled only when the video resolution is set to HD at 120 fps. The 21MP takes gorgeous pictures with blurred backgrounds. I love how the photos taken can be cropped and edited on board. The video is 4K is impressive, and the video recording continues until the memory card is full. Settings can be accessed through the touchscreen and the menu button on the camera body. The built-in microphones provide outstanding audio quality even without using the external microphone. Because Nikon made and designed this camera mainly for vlogging, the creator kit by Nikon is a good value; it includes a tripod with a good grip for taking selfies that houses the Bluetooth remote control and storage for an SD card in the tripod in addition to microphone and cable. USB-C port for charging as well as transferring data to the computer. The camera can be charged via any power bank for continued use. The camera is Bluetooth and Wi-Fi enabled. I downloaded Nikon SnapBridge and connected my iPhone to the camera via Wi-Fi to quickly transfer the captured media. Also, the app offers basic features like enabling GPS location on the photos and remote photographing. Note SnapBridge app would disconnect if the app runs in the background.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Touch screen, Video quality
    Cons mentioned:
    Battery life
    Tech Insider Network Member

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Great for content creators!!

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    Tech Insider Network Member
    Posted .
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    THE BREAKDOWN: The Nikon Z30 is packed with options for creators and leans toward the vloggers and streamers. It has 4K video a flip out touch screen with great audio all in a light-weight package. The Nikon Z30 has a great feel, the layout is great and feels very well made. When you pick it up you think this is a nice piece of equipment. The ergonomics of the Z30 is great. I feel like I have larger hands, and this felt really good in the hand. The video quality is really amazing at 4k with the frame rate of 30p, they also offer 25p and 24p. Never miss a session again by forgetting to actually start recording, this camera includes a red REC lamp (tally light) to let you know you are recording. This is a great feature. The Z30 has a 20.9-megapixel resolution that really delivers on the detail. The CMOS sensor and the Expeed 6 processing engine combine to produce high resolution low noise photos even at speeds up to 51,200 ISO. Speaking of ISO, on this camera it goes from 100 to 51,200. This camera can shoot up to 11fps which is really great for action shots. The internal mic is actually pretty good in a pinch. I was skeptical at first on how the inherent mic would perform, but like I said it actually performed rather well. I personally like to have a good mic to have really good audio. The Rode video micro is a great high performing mic that comes in the Nikon creators accessory pack along with the handheld grip/tripod and Bluetooth remote. The grip/tripod works great for content creators. It is easy to hold on to and use. When you are creating content, you can just set it on the table and start recording then you can go into vertical mode very easily to shoot for Instagram or Facebook. One note on the remote is that you have to wake it up to sync when you want to use it. Not that big of deal but I wanted to mention it isn’t always connected and ready. The internal system of the camera can seem very complex at first but once you work it for a while it becomes easier to navigate. If you are coming from a smart phone to the Z30 you may be overwhelmed at the menu options at first. One other thing I wish this camera had is in-body stabilization. It isn’t a deal breaker but after you use it for a while you overcome how to hold and use the camera to adjust for it. This camera is created for video, but I do miss the EVF (electronic view finder) when using it to take photos. The Nikon Smart bridge app is really amazing. I love being able to take photos and video’s and they automatically go to my phone so I can share and post them. The camera comes with a Nikkor Z DX 16-50mm f/3.5-6.3 VR which is a good wide-angle zoom lens for both video and photos. The VR portion of the title is for the Vibration Reduction or as you might have heard of image stabilization. The auto focus feature works very well. It is touted to have 209-point autofocus system which works quickly and well. PRO’s: - Tally light - Lightweight setup - Both touch and conventional controls - Great for creating content CON’s: - Battery life - No viewfinder SUMMARY: Overall, this product worked as intended, and I would recommend this to a friend if they were in the market for a device like this.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Compact size, Video quality
    Tech Insider Network Member

    Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    Nikon Quality in Compact Form, with Compromises

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    Tech Insider Network Member
    Posted .
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    Nikon's latest digital camera, the Z 30, is their attempt at offering a creator-focused, video-forward device in what has quickly become a popular, competitive space: mirrorless cameras. To that end, Nikon is aiming the Z 30 squarely at the creator/vlogger/streamer crowd, with their marketing materials leaning heavily into the video capabilities and self photo/video capture abilities of their new camera. The Z 30 also happens to be the most affordable entry point into Nikon's Z lineup of mirrorless cameras, meaning those of us that have been very curious about mirrorless devices but unwilling or unable to fork out thousands of dollars for a mirrorless camera have a new option to consider. I'm approaching the Z 30 as a amateur photographer and decade-long user of a Nikon DSLR who is new to the mirrorless field. I've loved my 2010-era Nikon DSLR for many years, and it's faithfully served me across the world. While my DSLR is still fully functional and capable of high-quality images (a testament to the reliability of Nikon products, for sure), it's sorely lacking many of the technological advances of the past decade. The Z 30 arrived in typical understated Nikon packaging, with the 16-50mm kit lens, charging cable, camera strap and basic user manual and warranty documentation. Upon first inspection it's clear that even with their entry-level model Nikon goes great lengths to produce a quality product, with excellent fit-and-finish and a reassuring heft. Yes, it's an all-plastic model, but don't let that be a turnoff. The Z 30 and its kit lens are absolutely quality products, and plastic has the added benefit of being lightweight. If you've used any Nikon DSLR or mirrorless product you'll be right at home with the Z 30. I've always been a fan of Nikon's logical controls and excellent in-hand feel and the Z 30 is no exception. Despite being substantially smaller and lighter than my Nikon DSLR the Z 30 feels every bit as comfortable in my hand, with the ergonomics I've come to expect from this brand. Buttons may have moved around slightly but everything is instantly familiar and usable. Display tech has come a long way since my 2010 DSLR, and the Z 30's screen is excellent. It smartly swings out from the side and rotates 180 degrees, allowing you to position it exactly where you need to for the perfect shot, and then fold it away for safekeeping when you're done. Resolution is great and touch sensitivity is top-notch -- if you've not had a touchscreen on your camera, it's a fantastic addition, giving you smartphone-like control when you need it but reassuringly backed up with a plethora of physical controls. It's a good thing Nikon includes a great screen, because you'll be using it 100 percent of the time. There's new viewfinder on the Z 30, electronic or not, nor is there a built-in flash. Those are two big differences between the Z 30 and the Z 50, the camera above this one in Nikon's mirrorless system. There are pros and cons, and I think I still prefer a viewfinder in many cases (especially outside in direct sunlight), but having access to the touchscreen and full menus while framing your shot is awesome. My favorite feature is the tap-to-focus option, which lets you lock focus on your subject with a simple tap. Importantly, the Z 30 has enough screen resolution to see whether you hit the right focus target before you upload all your photos to your phone or computer. Connectivity is another strong suit of the Z 30. This camera includes both bluetooth and wifi connection options and full compatibility with Nikon's free SnapBridge mobile app. Connecting your phone or tablet to the Z 30 with SnapBridge is pretty straightforward, and I've had no connection problems since initial setup. Communication is two-way and can be set to happen in the background, which enables awesome features like GPS location on your photos and videos and automatic uploading of your photos to your mobile device for immediate sharing. I encourage you to explore all the settings in SnapBridge and the camera menus, as leaving all the options turned on the background drains your camera and mobile device batteries faster, and uploading every photo can quickly become annoying. SnapBridge also enables remote control of the Z 30, which depending on your use case can be invaluable. I definitely appreciated the ability to connect to the Z 30 via wifi and selectively upload full-resolution JPEGs to my phone on a recent business trip where I found myself without an SD card reader. The Z 30 includes menus upon menus of controls for fine-tuning your photos, videos and camera behaviors, accessible from the camera's display using both touch and physical controls. If you're familiar with Nikon's menu structures you'll once again find yourself right at home, but if you're intimidated by the sheer volume of options, you'll be happy to know the camera can handle everything with alacrity in its automatic mode. Even after a decade of Nikon use I still appreciate the "?" option available on many camera menus, which offers a succinct description of many controls to guide you as you use the camera. It's quicker than a web search and can save you from mucking things up when you're out using your Z 30. So how does this Nikon perform? With photos, my comfort area, I'd say the Z 30 is top-notch. The 20 megapixel crop sensor (DX APC-C size, aka 1.5 times smaller than a full-size sensor) provides more than enough detail, and Nikon's fabulous image processing, auto-focusing and color-handling prowess is on full display here. Photos are generally sharp and balanced, colors are accurate and focus is on-point, every bit as good and better than my DSLR. Nikon's excellent 16-50mm kit lens really is a gem, with a very usable focal range and great image stabilization. If you know Nikon's DX cameras you know they don't come with image stabilization in the camera body, instead relying on the lens, denoted by the "VR" branding in this lens' full name. Image stabilization is high on my priority list for someone that snaps photos almost exclusively handheld. This kit lens produces great results at all focal lengths with appropriate lighting, and Nikon's excellent ISO capabilities mean you can get good results in low light, although you'll want to stay close to that 16mm length for the best results. The Z 30 produces quality images even at high ISOs, but you'll certainly start to notice digital noise as the ISO increases. Regardless, this lens focuses quickly and silently, introduces almost no distortion, can produce great background blur and folds up into itself for storage and transport. The Z 30 with this lens is a compact, lightweight shooter, perfect for popping in your bag and infinitely more transportable than even the smallest DSLRs. Video quality is great, especially with the built-in stereo mics, photo-and-video "selfie" mode (rotate the screen to face the same direction as the lens, turn the camera around and you'll have a selfie powerhouse), and I'm sure video types will appreciate the ability of the Z 30 to record continuously for 125 minutes, much longer than many competitors. However, there are a few things keeping the Z 30 from a perfect score in my mind. Advertised as a video-forward device, the Z 30 lacks a few important options. While it can record beautiful 4K video, it can only do so at 30 frames per second. The going rate these days is 60 fps, which the Z 30 can only do in 1080p. The difference between 30 and 60 fps is noticeable even to untrained eyes. With 4K video quickly becoming the standard I think Nikon's decision to limit the Z 30 to 30 fps in 4K resolution is problematic, especially considering modern smart phones can shoot 4k in 60 or even 120 fps. Add to this the Z 30's lack of a headphone jack -- which means you can't listen to your audio through stereo headphones as it's recorded, leaving you guessing as to the real audio quality until you upload your video to your editing device -- and I'm left scratching my head as to why Nikon left out two key video features you can find in the mobile device you're probably reading this review on. For me personally, the bigger issue is the lack of DX-specific lenses for Nikon's DX-line mirrorless cameras like the Z 30 and Z 50. Nikon has dozens of Z-mount lenses, yes, but only three DX-specific Z-mount lenses. The 16-50mm kit lens is very good, but the lack of options is noticeable even to this amateur hobbyist photographer. DX-line Nikons lack in-body image stabilization, meaning a lens without Nikon's VR designation leaves you with no image stabilization whatsoever, a huge loss when shooting handheld, especially in low-light situations. Hands-down my best low-light photos come from so-called "fast prime" lenses that offer fixed focal lengths and ultra-low minimum apertures. Nikon has no DX-line fast prime Z lenses, instead offering only fast-primes without VR, designed mainly for use on their full-frame models. While you can use these lenses on the Z 30, you'll be doing so without image stabilization, possibly resulting in blurry photos when shooting handheld on the ultra-compact, lightweight Z 30. Overall, I really, really like the Nikon Z 30. It's delightfully compact but reassuringly high-quality, it's easy for anyone to use, and it can produce excellent images. That said, I think Nikon missed the mark when it comes to video, with no 60 fps at 4K resolution and no headphone jack to be found. As a photographer I can forgive these omissions, but I am pretty disappointed in the lack of affordable, DX-focused lenses, especially the infinitely-useful fast-prime type. I am waiting anxiously for Nikon to reveal their planned "24mm DX" Z-mount prime, which -- if it includes VR and a reasonable price tag -- will be a must-have for me and many others.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Compact size
    Cons mentioned:
    Charging
    Tech Insider Network Member

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Just when you thought your Camera Phone was enough

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    Tech Insider Network Member
    Posted .
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    I'll be the first to admin, I never thought I'd own another dedicated camera after buying a Nikon D5600 DSLR a few years ago to take on a cruise. While it was a great camera, it was huge and bulky even for a compact crop sensor camera and getting photos on and off of the camera were more cumbersome just using my phone and sharing to friends, family, social media, or printing services. Around the time I got my DSLR, I had heard of "Mirrorless" Cameras becoming popular for their reduced size and bulk, full size cmos sensors, fewer moving parts/failure issues, and better response and video capabilities. There were some downsides, like overheating, but overall they seemed to be the direction digital photography was headed. So of course I was thrilled to test Nikon's entry-level Z30 4K with Vblogger kit when I had the chance. My initial impressions right away was what a massive difference there was in camera body size and weight. You can see there's no longer the bump for the mirrors in the camera body and the lack of a viewfinder for better or worse (more on this later) also make for a big difference in size. Then you take into account the D5600 has an 18-140mm lens while the Z30 has a 16-50mm lens and it almost feels like the Z30 is a point and shoot or an old school Nikon Coolpix because it is so compact in size. That was actually something that was kind of a negative at first for me, the smaller body and profile on the Z30 made initial impressions seem like it felt less "premium" but after using it for awhile its clear that less can be better and the camera overall felt great in the hand with a pronounced grip bump. The 16-50mm kit lens however definitely does not feel as nice in terms of build quality or feel when focusing it compared to the 18-140mm kit lens that came with the D5600, which is regarded as one of the best kit DX kit lenses that Nikon came out with. I may get the Nikon FTZ II adapter to use my old 35mm and 18-140mm DX lenses but I will get a lot of the bulk back that way, however, the 18-140mm kit lens is pretty much perfect for a single lens and not having to swap for most touristy or sight-seeing usage. Also, if you have any inkling of needing a better telephoto lens, go ahead and spend on the Z30 kit that has both the 16-50mm and 50-250mm kits as that will save you $100 over buying it later. On to connectivity and the Snapbridge app. This is something that REALLY bothered me on my D5600, you couldn't take remote photos using Snapbridge unless connected directly to the Camera using WiFi, which was slow and cludgy and disconnected you from your local WiFi. Not a big deal if you're out shooting in the field, but if you wanted to transfer pictures to the cloud you have to disconnect and reconnect to WiFi internet to start that transfer. Also, you can't connect both the Camera to the App and the Nikon wireless controller via Bluetooth simultaneously, it is one or the other. I really wish the Snapbridge App just let you use it in Bluetooth mode for setting time delay or snapping a picture, but again, it must be in WiFi mode as it transmits an image to your phone as a digital viewfinder. The remote is just via Bluetooth so you can use it like a remote to just take pictures, set delay etc. Also, when using the App to take pictures, you must use A, M, or S mode, you can't just set to Auto and snap pictures, but you can with the remote controller. I was really hoping 5 years of upgrades would make this experience better, but sadly it is still clunky integration with the app. One really nice feature of the App however is that it gives you free lifetime storage of 2MB versions of your pictures with account and registration. Some people may have privacy concerns but that is a great free cloud options through Nikon. As previously mentioned, this camera does not have a viewfinder port, so you will definitely find yourself struggling with that at times and also struggling to get the right distance for closer shots because you can't put the camera to your face but still view what you are shooting with the LCD to frame your shot. That may drive anyone looking for a more traditional camera experience a little bonkers, but for most people its not a big issue since the LCD viewfinder is very similar to using a camera phone. The full swivel LCD is also great of course for self-filming and vlogging. The included Vlogging kit is nothing special, its a 3rd party tripod/grip that really just holds the Nikon OEM remote control and it has a furry wind muffling microphone to help in outdoor conditions. I think most serious vloggers are still going to use some kind of pocket/remote microphone instead. The remote is great however, but setting it up is a little different than in the instructions. You go to the setup area (not Network) on the camera settings and add it there but the instructions are off slightly, you have to choose to pair to remote ML-07 OR smart device Bluetooth, you can't have both connected at once. The video recording capabilities were very good, easy to use and the self-stabilization feature was really excellent. I used the camera to record Happy Birthday for my daughter's party and it came out great as darkness set in. I didn't even have to focus the camera and just held it while recording and both sound and audio came out great. You do have to remember to change the mode slider between camera and video however! I didn't have any issues running into the camera shutting down or overheating, but it was cool and around 60 degrees outside. In the direct sunlight or summer heat, with a black camera body that situation may be different. Make sure to set the video resolution and quality in the settings in advance so you know what you're getting! Finally, in terms of physical connectivity, there's good and there's bad. First with the bad, there is no actual battery charger. Not that Nikon has a great track record of blazing fast battery chargers, but the ability to charge a battery while shooting was a pretty big benefit. You must charge the battery while in the camera, and that charge speed is fully dependent on the type of charger you have connected to the camera. A USB-C from most PCs or laptops will charge VERY slowly, like 7hours at 10W (5V 2A), with faster chargers like 40W or 65W you can charge faster, but they cost additional money. The USB-C port can also be used to transfer photos off of the camera which is nice so when you connect the Camera vs. USB-C it shows up like any other mass storage device as "Z 30" with the individual picture directories. Navigation is super fast, so I'll probably use this method to move photos around instead of removing the SD Card and finding my USB 3.0 adapter for it, or using some cloud medium to move things around. There's also a micro-HDMI port for previewing photos or movies, I have an adapter somewhere but I've never used it before. Maybe for folks editing video in the field this is useful but the option is there. So that's pretty much it, I've used the camera for about 1.5 weeks taking some pictures of the yard and family and its a huge difference in terms of portability and accessibility, two of the main reasons people use their smartphones more and more. People just don't like to lug around extra things when they are trying to stay mobile and active and live in the moment instead of through a lens. With the Nikon Z30, its small enough and light enough that its not really that obtrusive and with the 16-50mm lens, its actually small enough to fit into moderate sized jacket pockets. For those who want a little more full featured camera and a viewfinder, take a look at the Z50. But for those who want to vlog or take pictures on the go with a minimalist camera, the Z30 is an excellent option!

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Video quality
    Cons mentioned:
    Charging
    Tech Insider Network Member

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    A real content creator's camera

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    Tech Insider Network Member
    Posted .
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    Video logging is the in thing nowadays when it comes to cameras. And quite obviously cell phones at the front of this new trend. As such camera manufacturers are well aware of this trend and as to remain competitive, these companies have been offering “video logging” cameras in recent years. Nikon some reason has not joined in the fray until now. So here comes the Nikon Z 30 APS-C video logging camera. The Nikon Z 30 can be viewed as the little brother of the existing Nikon Z 50. It has similar specs compared to the Z 50 which includes the sensor, form factor and build quality and even the battery. There are notable differences though which I’ll explain below. First is the absence of an electronic view finder and a built-in flash. Now some people especially those who are more into stills photography who may consider the lack of an electronic view finder is a dealbreaker, the absence of a view finder makes perfect sense. It seems the Z 30 is marketed to beginner or a bit advanced video loggers and videographers coming from cell phones, hence a viewfinder will not be a dealbreaker for them. Also, the removal of the viewfinder and the built-in flash makes the costs lower which also makes sense, since these are beginner users making a lower price point appealing to them. Second, the 30-minute limit in video recording has been increased to roughly two hours which puts the Z 30 in the realm of camcorders. Do note that in certain countries (especially those in Europe) have limits on video recording capabilities. But there are reports that the Z 30 has tendency to overheat or to put it gently warm up after extended use. So far in my limited test on the video capabilities, I have not encountered any warmups. Lastly, since this is now more of a “video camera with stills capabilities” rather than a “stills camera with video capabilities”, Nikon has decided to include a USB-C port that can power (and charge) the camera so that it can fully function not only as a video camera but as a web cam also. Another thing to note is the auto-focusing capabilities of the Z 30. Since video loggers are presumed to wok mostly alone, the tracking capabilities of the Z 30 is top notch. It uses eyes tracking to auto-focus on moving objects and it also has good auto-focusing on subjects such as products or items being displayed for close up. In this regard the Z 30 passes as a “video logging” camera. The primary common thing of the Z 30 as compared to the Z 50 and also the retro-style Zfc is the image quality. This is a no brainer since all three crop sensor cameras share the same sensor. One thing of note that that even though this is an APS-C camera, performance in low light is very good. In addition, the included kit lens (which all three cameras share) has good image quality for a kit lens. In fact, background blur is more pronounced that the included kit lens is entering APS-C baes f2.8 territory (I may be saying too much but the kit lens is actually good.) Unfortunately, Nikon AFAIK only offers three APS-C Z mount lenses while the rest are full frame. And though you can use full frame lenses on the APS-C Z mount cameras, they are quite expensive. But then again Nikon may be presuming that newbies may be satisfied with the kit lens only. Moreover, I understand Nikon has a lens roadmap for the Z series out on the internet. Handling of the Nikon Z 30 is also superb. It is fairly small enough but has a grip which makes it like holing a compact DSLR. The body is light enough and even though the feel is a bit plasticky, holding the Z 30 is perfectly fine. I understand that the body of the Z 30 is weather sealed too. But I cannot determine if the included kit lens is also weather sealed too. And though in my opinion most video loggers will not be needing a weather sealed body and not having a weather sealed lens is self-defeating, having a weather sealed body is always a welcome addition. One thing I don’t like about the Z 30 is the lack of a stand-alone charger. Charging via USB-C takes long at around seven hours. A trick here is to use a power direct charger whether it’s a plug-in or a PD battery pack. A stand-alone charger is also for purchase. But unfortunately, it seems cameras like cell phones no longer include chargers. (I understand that Nikon sells different creators’ accessory kits in the region, but the one described above is the one available in the United States.) Finally, to add to the video logging experience, a dedicated creators’ accessory kit is available to complement the Z 30. This includes the Nikon BT remote, a tripod and remote holder, and a Rode Video Mic with wind screen. A small wind screen which you attached to the hotshot is also available for purchase. But personally, Nikon should have also included it in the box. Overall, the Nikon Z 30 is a video logging camera also which is also good for stills too. It is sold at a reasonable price point aimed as video loggers who are considering upgrading their gear in the near future.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Autofocus, Touch screen
    Tech Insider Network Member

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Great camera for vlogging or photos

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    Tech Insider Network Member
    Posted .
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    I have always used a competitor brand of cameras since that's what my dad always used. In fact, I still use his old film camera that he had when I was born (I'm 41). I had since bought a DSLR from that brand and have enjoyed using it over the years. However, it is meant to just be a still camera. It can do video, but it's focus is still shots. As such, being a larger DSLR, it is heavier and more cumbersome. The Nikon Z30 is basically meant to be a vlogging camera first, and a still camera second. A key factor in that is weight. The Z30, being a mirrorless camera, is lighter by far. This makes a huge difference when vlogging. Watch a YouTube channel that shows a lot of content of the creator with the camera pointing at them. They're holding it at nearly arms length when filming themselves. Holding a lot of weight like that for extended periods is tiresome. The Z30 combats that issue by being less than one pound without a lens. The screen flips around to be viewed from the front and the camera has a recording light on the front so you never have to guess if it's actively recording. The screen is also a touchscreen. This feature can be turned off. I noticed that while walking around, the screen would touch me and the camera would take a shot. If you use this camera for stills and wear it around your neck and end up with a ton of pictures that you don't remember taking, that is what is happening. I received this camera with the Creator's Accessory Kit, which includes the ML-L7 remote, SmallRig tripod/grip, and Rode microphone. Although I didn't keep any recorded video, I carried the camera around for a while just walking around and filming. I can say, that the camera's light weight really showed. It wasn't tiring at all. The Rode microphone worked great at recording audio and really kept wind noise to a minimum. It's great that the remote seats into the grip (using a magnet) and is perfectly positioned to use while vlogging. Both the camera and remote have "Function 1" and "Function 2" buttons which are programmable to do what you want. The grip feels great in the hand. Your index finger sits right under the top pivot point naturally giving you extra stability. Both camera and video capture buttons are perfectly positioned for your thumb. The 4k resolution is great for videos, however, 30fps just doesn't quite seem enough. Even my phone records 4k at 60fps, so it seems that this camera should have that capability too. I will say that videos are perfectly clear and it's not a deal-breaker for me. The auto focus is quick to adapt to changing scenery or if you hold something up to the camera. As far as photos, the Z30 is still great for still shots. The camera's auto focus will track the eyes of the subject (including people, dogs and cats). The screen will show a yellow box around the eye and if the subject moves their eyes, it will track them. I have mainly used this camera in "Auto" mode. It seems to know what I'm trying to do with the shot and adapts instantly. I have included a picture of a little flower. The camera focused on it and left the background perfectly blurry. Another shot of my car is in lower light conditions. It's clear and sunny outside, but both the car (in the shade) and the very bright background are perfectly clear and balanced. You can still see all of the details in the shade. One feature that I wish the camera had was the ability to take a picture while recording video. This would be great for thumbnails for videos. Even if you're not actively recording, if you're in video mode, you can't take a picture. I understand why it doesn't, but it seems like a feature that would be possible to have since my phone can do it. Overall, this is a great camera. Both for photos and vlogging. It's perfect for someone just starting out with vlogging. I would definitely recommend it with the Creator's Accessory Kit.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Autofocus, Compact size
    Tech Insider Network Member

    Rated 5 out of 5 stars

    Need a camera for both video and photo? Buy this!

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    Tech Insider Network Member
    Posted .
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    I’ve been a content creator now for around 10 years, having used various cameras to shoot B-Roll video for various YouTube creators, and for my own personal photography projects. My main camera for a few years was a Nikon DSLR which I’d purchased at Best Buy as part of a bundle kit. It worked well for standard photography projects, but lacked the detail or stabilization for video shoots. So, when I had the opportunity to test drive the new Nikon Z30, I jumped at the chance to take this to a local Pumpkin festival to capture shots with my visiting family. This particular Nikon came with a creator bundle, including the camera body, a 16-50mm lens, a Rode microphone, an attachable handle which can hold the included remote and act as a small tripod, the owners manual, a battery, and a USB charging cable. You will need an SD card, and in my case chose to purchase a larger capacity SanDisk at Best Buy that happened to be on sale. You will need to attach the lens to the body, install the battery, and allow the Nikon to charge. One of the first things you’ll notice about this camera is the lack of a viewfinder. Since this is marketed for content creators, you’ll have a touchscreen LCD display which can be positioned for selfie shots, or swiveled and tucked back in to allow you to view and take photos on the fly. The menu navigation allows for use of the touchscreen, or you can use the directional pad and OK button on the camera to make selections. While this is marketed as a 4K camera, you’ll find various frame sizes and frame rate options; with options for 1080P at up to 120 frames per second. It even includes three slow motion options for 1080 video! This isn’t something I can say another other camera I own has. Given the lighter weight of the camera, you can opt to use the handle with the remote to start and stop video recording without needing to touch the camera directly. I also found that the video taken was stabilized well without a lot of video distortion. While this won’t likely match an action camera, it’s pretty great for capturing video of events knowing your video won’t look shaky. If you’re using this for general photography, you’ll find this Nikon very capable of handling your photo needs. I tend to stay with RAW+Fine JPEG, but if you’re using a smaller capacity SD Card, you can adjust this for just JPEG (fine, normal, and basic) or just RAW. The auto-focus using the included 16-50mm lens is quick, and when capturing moments on the fly makes for great photos with minimal waiting for the lens to focus. You can even set your preference for the “Vignette” or turn it off entirely if you want to avoid the blurring along the edge of your shots. You can also set the image size between small (2784x1856), medium (4176x2784), and large (default - 5568x3712). The larger the image, the larger the file size, with the settings showing a Large image storing about 20 MB per shot. While this isn’t marketed as a still photography model, you’ll find the Nikon Z 30 able to handle all of your photo/video needs. Given the cost of this camera, the ability to swap out the lens for other sizes, a quick auto-focus, and one of the best 4K video cameras I’ve used this an EASY recommendation. The versatility of this camera makes it a great choice for those looking to jump in to content creation or those needing a camera that can handle both video and photography tasks. It also allows you to use this on your PC as a webcam when connected over USB. It was detected by my Windows PC quickly, and was immediately able to use. I also didn’t experience any overheating with over an hour worth of use outdoors; compared to my larger mirrorless camera. I honestly feel Nikon really delivered with this camera, and it has become the camera I take with me to every video shoot.

    I would recommend this to a friend
  • Pros mentioned:
    Easy to use, Touch screen
    Tech Insider Network Member

    Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    The Nikon z30 is a small & sleek with everything

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    Tech Insider Network Member
    Posted .
    This reviewer received promo considerations or sweepstakes entry for writing a review.

    Straight out of the box, the Nikon z30 is a small, sleek, and manageable camera. Lens, buttons, and screen are the perfect size despite the small structure of the overall camera. Alongside the z30 is the Creators Accessory Kit, including a microphone, tripod, and remote control. While also paired with the accessory kit, the z30 is quite the starter kit for new creators. Its primary purpose is aimed towards vlogging, but it can also be used as a more affordable and compact precise camera. With its large grip, the z30 feels comfortable in the hands of many but also feels small enough to be a travel-friendly camera. The flip screen is very clear, and it also comes in handy that it’s a touch screen which makes it easy to change for quick changes. The buttons and tabs feel high quality; nothing feels cheap about the z30 despite the entry-size price. The battery can hold up to 75 minutes of recording, which isn’t the worst but isn’t the best. With Nikon’s 20.9MP APS-C sensor and 4K quality, the z30 is an excellent first choice for camera rookies. First, starting up the z30, the first step tutorial was relatively straightforward. Multiple settings were easy to change and, overall, had a well-put user interface. The z30 also has a Bluetooth connection that was reasonably easy for Nikon’s app SnapBridge. Trying to establish a connection between my phone and camera was straightforward, but it also took a while to connect. Although the Bluetooth connection was handy, I thought that being able to connect to Bluetooth to disconnect the connection with the remote control was a disability to the camera’s potential. The dials and switches were easy to understand, and it was clear what functions were controlled by what buttons scrolls. Unfortunately, the z30 doesn’t have a headphone socket, so there’s no way to monitor the audio that’s being recorded; There are audio level indicators but it’s difficult to determine whether or not you’re picking up any wind or background noises. The additional mic was a helpful addition, but without a headphone socket to check the audio, it’s almost an unnecessary addition. The z30 is a very capable camera. Shooting 4k video up to 30 fps is a fair number, although it doesn’t have an image-stabilized sensor. 1080 is also an option and can shoot up to 120p; but also, there’s no 30-minute limit on videos on the z30. Nikon's 16-50mm collapsible zoom is a decent lens that offers a useful wide angle of view and better quality than some other cameras. The z30 can also use the same Z lens mount as Nikon’s much larger full-frame sensor cameras. Starting at $700, the z30 is the cheapest mirrorless camera that Nikon offers. The majority of the buttons are on the right side of the camera, making one-handed operations easy, but unlike on some cameras, there are no joysticks that you can use to move the focus on around the frame. Nikon states that the z30 will record 125 minutes of 1080 footage if power is provided in the camera’s USB-C port. The ‘i” menu gives you entrance to twelve of the camera’s key settings, and you can customize it if there are other options you need access to. With the z30, its EN-EL25 battery gives a CIPA rating of 330 shots per charge. Not the best, but the z30 can be recharged using its USB-C socket, or it can also be operated from a second external battery. Coming alongside the z30 is the Creators Accessory Kit which holds the RODE VideoMicro microphone, SmallRig Tripod Grip, and Bluetooth Remote Control (ML-L7). The microphone is small but capable. It can pick up most audio and has a sock cover to protect the microphone itself. Unfortunately, there isn’t a headphone socket to monitor the audio, but the external microphone is better than the stock mic included inside the z30. Also paired with the mic, the SmallRig tripod is a comfortable small-size grip that can be held by any size hand. The body of the tripod itself feels a bit too much plastic but still holds durably. Its joints feel very cheap and hard to adjust but when in place is a well-stable tripod. Coming along the tripod is the ML-L7 Bluetooth remote control that connects to the z30. Trying to connect the z30 to the remote was fairly straightforward, it just took a while to connect, and occasionally the remote would shut off when trying to pair with the camera. But when all paired and connected, the remote works well with the tripod. Being able to hold the tripod and also control the z30 by remote makes it easier for users to create vlogs or content. Altogether the z30 is a formidable easy entry camera that’s fairly user-friendly. The quality produced by the

    I would recommend this to a friend

What experts are saying

Powered by alaTest

Rating 4.3 out of 5 stars with 8 reviews

The analysis of all aggregated expert reviews shows that the reviewers are positive about low-light, focus, lens and design. Editors are less positive about stabilizer and sensor and have mixed opinions about durability. Using an algorithm based on product age, reviewers ratings history, popularity, product category expertise and other factors, this product gets an alaTest Expert Rating of 93/100 = Excellent quality.
  • TechRadarRating, 4 out of 5Tim Coleman on August 15, 2022

    Nikon Z30 reviewThe Nikon Z30 is a video-centric mirrorless camera for beginners

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  • GizmodoDecember 13, 2022

    Nikon's Z30 Vlogging Camera Is a Great Mirrorless Starter PickNikon has released a fairly capable, tiny run-and-gun 4K vlogging camera with the Z30. Just don't expect it to handle pro work.

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  • Tom's GuideOctober 12, 2023

    Nikon Z 30 reviewThe Nikon Z 30 cuts size, weight and cost to a minimum, but it cuts a few corners along the way, especially for shooting stills.

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  • T3Rating, 4 out of 5Gavin Stoker on August 16, 2022

    Nikon Z30 reviewNikon chases the burgeoning content creator market with a consumer-level mirrorless camera that aims to put video first

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  • CreativeBloqRating, 4.5 out of 5Rachael Phillips on January 5, 2023

    Nikon Z30 review: compact mirrorless is a dream for vloggersThe Nikon Z30 is perfect for vloggers who want a compact, lightweight option to be able to capture their daily lives

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  • AppleInsiderRating, 4.5 out of 5Andrew O'Hara on August 27, 2022

    Nikon Z 30 review: The social media & video creator's camera | AppleInsiderThe Nikon Z 30 is the camera maker's most affordable mirrorless shooter yet, and it's designed with social media and video creators in mind.

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  • PhotographyBLOGMark Goldstein on July 22, 2022

    Nikon Z30 ReviewThe new Z30 is Nikon's third APS-C cropped-sensor mirrorless camera, following in the footsteps of the Z50 and Z fc models. This time around, though, it's primarily targeted at vloggers and content creators. Find out what it has to offer by

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  • videomaker.comTony Morales on September 29, 2022

    Nikon Z 30 review: Should content creators get the Z 30?The Nikon Z 30 is Nikon's newest mirrorless camera for content creators; lets take a look at the camera and see if it's worth getting.

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