Silence [DVD] [2016]

  • SKU: 5715603
  • Release Date: 03/28/2017
  • Rating: R
$9.99
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Overview

Ratings & Reviews


Overall Customer Rating:
96% of customers would recommend this product to a friend (146 out of 153)

Special Features


  • Closed Captioned

Synopsis


Silence
In this passion project from director Martin Scorsese (who spent nearly three decades trying to get it made), a 17th century Portuguese Jesuit priest (Andrew Garfield) receives word that his mentor (Liam Neeson) has renounced his faith while on a mission in Japan. Concerned, he travels to the island nation with another clergyman (Adam Driver) to investigate, only to find that the country's Christian population are being systematically exterminated. Witnessing the inglorious reality of torture and martyrdom committed against Japanese Christians rocks his faith to the core. Based on Shusaku Endo's acclaimed 1966 novel. ~ Violet LeVoit, Rovi

Cast & Crew


  • Liam Neeson
    Liam Neeson - Father Cristóvão Ferreira
  • Andrew Garfield
    Andrew Garfield - Father Sebastião Rodrigues
  • Adam Driver
    Adam Driver - Father Francisco Garrpe
  • Tadanobu Asano
    Tadanobu Asano - Interpreter
  • Ciarán Hinds
    Ciarán Hinds - Father Alessandro Valignano



Overall customer rating

4.6
96%
would recommend to a friend
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    One of Scorsese's mature masterpieces

    Posted
    RobertB
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    For over 25 years, Scorsese has been obsessed with this story which follows two 17th-century Jesuit priests who travel from Portugal to Japan in search of their missing mentor during a time when Christianity was outlawed and their presence forbidden. Scorsese grew up in Manhattan's Little Italy section where both priests and gangsters lived around him, and his early goal was to become a priest before deciding on being a filmmaker. Consequently, both religion and violence would inform his entire body of work, from "Kundun" and "The Last Temptation of Christ" to "Taxi Driver" and "Goodfellas". But "Silence" is far from being a simple religious film about Christian faith; instead it reflects Scorsese's lifetime struggle with doubt, or, more accurately, the 'silence of God' -- a subject that had obsessed Ingmar Bergman as well (particularly in Bergman's early sixties trilogy, most specifically its central film, "Winter Light" -- a story of a small town priest who loses his faith). This is a visually stunning film with performances that are perfect -- especially Andrew Garfield as the protagonist priest Rodrigues, Liam Neeson as his mentor Ferreira, and Japanese actor Yôsuke Kubozuka (who plays the crazed Kichijiro as if he were a descendant of Toshiro Mifune's bandit in "Seven Samurai"). Viewing this film however brings with it a warning: It is not for the unseasoned filmgoer and very difficult for many viewers to enjoy or even to sit through. I found it compelling throughout but it moves inexorably slow as a silk caterpillar crawling along a sheet of glass. Stylistically, too, it is unlike anything Scorsese has given us before, the exact antithesis of his preceding film, "Wolf of Wall Street" which was profane in its crude 'fun' as well as paced like a music video, more exemplary of the rapidly vibrant editing style we've all become used to. I can't say strongly enough that "Silence" is a Serious Film, obviously made by Scorsese for himself alone without giving a single whit about what critics or audiences will think about it. At 74, he has earned that right. Here is an obsessively personal document of a great filmmaker approaching his own winter sleep. Perhaps Scorsese is Icarus flying too close to the sun but I think it likely that in fifty years from now when scholars take in his complete filmography, "Silence" -- no matter how tedious it might seem today -- will stand out as a masterpiece not unlike the Danish master filmmaker Carl Dreyer's late works, "Ordet" and "Gertrude". I certainly felt every single minute of this difficult, very trying film but I took something priceless away with me when I left the theater. I recommend it highly to the most serious and devout filmgoer. All others should best stay away.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    A masterpiece for the serious film viewer

    Posted
    Excellent
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    Martin Scorsese's "Silence" is one of 2016's most formidable films. For over 25 years, Scorsese has been obsessed with this story which follows two 17th-century Jesuit priests who travel from Portugal to Japan in search of their missing mentor during a time when Christianity was outlawed and their presence forbidden. Scorsese grew up in Manhattan's Little Italy section where both priests and gangsters lived around him, and his early goal was to become a priest before deciding on being a filmmaker. Consequently, both religion and violence would inform his entire body of work, from "Kundun" and "The Last Temptation of Christ" to "Taxi Driver" and "Goodfellas". But "Silence" is far from being a simple religious film about Christian faith; instead it reflects Scorsese's lifetime struggle with doubt, or, more accurately, the 'silence of God' -- a subject that had obsessed Ingmar Bergman as well (particularly in Bergman's early sixties trilogy, most specifically its central film, "Winter Light" -- a story of a small town priest who loses his faith). This is a visually stunning film with performances that are perfect -- especially Andrew Garfield as the protagonist priest Rodrigues, Liam Neeson as his mentor Ferreira, and Japanese actor Yôsuke Kubozuka (who plays the crazed Kichijiro as if he were a descendant of Toshiro Mifune's bandit in "Seven Samurai"). Viewing this film however brings with it a warning: It is not for the unseasoned filmgoer and very difficult for many viewers to enjoy or even to sit through. I found it compelling throughout but it moves inexorably slow as a silk caterpillar crawling along a sheet of glass. Stylistically, too, it is unlike anything Scorsese has given us before, the exact antithesis of his preceding film, "Wolf of Wall Street" which was profane in its crude 'fun' as well as paced like a music video, more exemplary of the rapidly vibrant editing style we've all become used to. I can't say strongly enough that "Silence" is a Serious Film, obviously made by Scorsese for himself alone without giving a single whit about what critics or audiences will think about it. At 74, he has earned that right. Here is an obsessively personal document of a great filmmaker approaching his own winter sleep. Perhaps Scorsese is Icarus flying too close to the sun but I think it likely that in fifty years from now when scholars take in his complete filmography, "Silence" -- no matter how tedious it might seem today -- will stand out as a masterpiece not unlike the Danish master filmmaker Carl Dreyer's late works, "Ordet" and "Gertrude". I certainly felt every single minute of this difficult, very trying film but I took something priceless away with me when I left the theater. I recommend it highly to the most serious and devout filmgoer. All others should best stay away.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Silence

    Posted
    Trickmaster
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    Martin Scorsese as we all know is a legendary director. He has created many of my favorite films which are Goodfellas, Taxi Driver, The Departed, Raging Bull, Mean Streets, The Aviator, Gang of New York, and Bringing Out The Dead. This film Silence is close to a 3 hour film which reminds me a lot of the classic films such as Ben-Hur and The Ten Commandments. It's a beautifully made film, but I can't agree that it is one of the greatest films of Martin Scorsese's career. This film is one of my favorite films and I recommend this film to anyone who has not yet watched a Martin Scorsese film.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Scorsese's Passion Project

    Posted
    RJToca
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    Silence is a beautiful film, both aesthetically and thematically. Despite positive reviews, it seemingly came and went with little fanfare, and only managed a single nomination at the Academy Awards for its gorgeous cinematography. I also enjoyed Hacksaw Ridge, but of the two Andrew Garfield spiritual movies that came out last year, I highly recommend Silence to anyone with the patience to appreciate it. Hopefully it will be given another look in the future. FYI, Best Buy has the incorrect artwork on their website, so if you don't receive the cover pictured on the site, don't worry.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    Martin Scorsese's Great Triumph

    Posted
    ImMaryPoppinsYall
    • My Best Buy® MemberMember

    No matter what you believe, you must believe something. That is the core of being human, and it is the score of Martin Scorsese's masterpiece "Silence," a brutal, haunting film that will leave you in awe and horror simultaneously as its stars, disappearing completely into their roles, are tested for nearly three hours in their faith and endurance in the face of overwhelming persecution. It is raw. It is staggering. And at the end of it all, you will sit in the silence, overwhelmed by the transcendent film you have just witnessed.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    Great moviemaking

    Posted
    Toyklectrr
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    Silence is a monumental film, destined to stand as a stalwart in cinema history as one of the most purposeful and precisely crafted in not only Scorsese's career but in contemporary moviemaking. It's radically different from much of today's mainstream moviemaking and it defines the medium as one capable of offering the sort of intimate, soulful, meaningful experiences the greatest stories demand. The film is beautifully acted, strikingly constructed, and one of the most thoughtfully and spiritually engaging films of its time.

    I would recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

    Long and Drawn Out

    Posted
    lapdofcr
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    I thought the film was very well done. I did not go into it with any great expectations. I was curious about the film as I was familiar with the Shimabara Uprising that occurred during the time period of this film. That being said, it is a serious drama and not an action film. If you expect to see a lot of action -- then this is not the film for you. The film was interesting, but, in my opinion, a little too drawn out. The plot is simple and follows a direct line...to an okay ending. The cinematography was great.

    No, I would not recommend this to a friend

  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

    A master at work

    Posted
    Drespy
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    Scorsese has had an amazing career and this effort fits well on top. He's made several films dealing with religion and his own Catholic background and issues of faith have always been present in those works. It's consolidated here. He also brings his love of Japanese film, with Prieto (Cinematographer), into the framing and capturing of the images of the film. It's wholly new, yet informed by rich history. Highly recommended.

    I would recommend this to a friend



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